Uberti Stallion problems

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by gr8oldguy, Jan 24, 2013.

  1. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

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    I just picked up a 38spl uberti stallion from my local gun shop last week. Of course, I took my new gun to the range and shot a few rounds. FIrst shot was a bullseye. I'm going to like this little gun...I thought. Next trip to the range I took some of my favorite 148gr wc handloads. Every other round was a misfire and it appeared to be light hammer strikes. Took it to the gun shop, the gunsmith adjusted the springs and back to the range, and I only had one misfire from a box of 50. Okay, it's getting better...I thought. Last night, I was going to practice trigger control and loaded it up with snap caps and the cylinder seized up like it was welded shut. After a few minutes of gently "massaging" the cylinder, it broke loose and appeared to function normally. It froze up one more time, and I got it to loosen again. I really like the little gun, when it fires, it is very accurate. This is a colt 1873 repoduction. Anyone have any thoughts? thanks for your time
     
  2. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    By seizing up,do you mean the cylinder stop is staying in the up position?
     

  3. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

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    I can tell you the cylinder would not move and the trigger and hammer were virutally inoperable. As I gently worked the cylinder, slowly back and forth, it began to give a bit and then, with more force than I was comfortable with, I was able to cock the gun and dry fire it. I dry fried it with snap caps several more times and it seemed to work ok. I'm sure mechanical issues don't just go away. Any help would be appreciated.
     
  4. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Do you bring the hammer back all the way after loading?

    SA revolvers need the hammer to go full swing. Normal half-cock to load (1-0-1111), bring the hammer back completely, then slowly lower. It should be on an empty chamber.

    Going from half-cock directly to lower is not a good ides.
     
  5. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

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    I keep that in mind. I have 2 other 1873s and they are all mechanically about the same. Actually in this scenario, I had just loaded the snap caps, pulled the hammer to full cock (from half cock) and dry fired. When I went to cock the hammer again...it was seized up.
     
  6. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

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    I see that there have been several viewers of this post. I'd like to say, that after a lot of study and screwing up I have determined what I was doing wrong with this revolver. Here are the issues encountered when taking this particular gun apart. While it's a beautiful weapon, I think it wasn't made right.
    1) the shell extractor rod it too short to allow for the extractions of the cylinder pin so...
    2) it is necessary to push the shell extractor down to pull out the cylinder pin...so
    3) when the shell extrator is push down a very small (but significant) portion of the extractor moves forward pushing against the cylinder, therefore...
    4) even though the cylinder pin is gone, there is enough pressure from the extractor rod on the cylinder to "hold everything in place".

    Once I noticed what was going on, all the problems on seemed to go away. In closing, I want to say, this little gun is an absolute joy to shoot and very accurate. It's just a pain in the rear to take apart and put back together. So if you are in the market for one, make sure the Uberti you are looking at has an extractor rod long enough to allow for the removal of the cylinder pin with no manipulation of the extractor rod.
     
  7. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    gr8oldguy:

    What you have said doesn't sound right to me - the ejector rod spring should keep the ejector forward, toward the muzzle, so that the ejector rod never bears against the face of the cylinder.

    There is a spring in the ejector rod housing?


    Note most Ruger single action revolvers have base pins (cylinder pins) with heads too long to prevent complete removal of the base pins without removing the ejector housing assembly. The base pin can be pulled forward enough to clear the frame for removal of the cylinder. Maybe the Stallion is made this way.

    But from you post, you were dry firing without the cylinder pin in place?

    Bob Wright
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2013
  8. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    In some single action revolvers you must remove the ejector rod housing screw and housing before removeing the cylinder or axis pin. This is how you remove the center pin in a Black Hawk .30 M1 caliber revolver.
    I expect the OP has a badly fouled cylinder pin. The front Boss on the cylinder can allow fouling to blow back around the pin and lock the rotation of the cylinder.:)
     
  9. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Wouldn't he know to push the ejector rod forward if he lost the rod return spring.:confused:
     
  10. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

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    Pictures are worth a thousand words. The first pic is the gun and how it looks fully assembled. The next pic shows that the cylinder pin hits the shell extractor knob. The next pic shows that the cylinder pin is too long to be pulled out with moving the shell extractor knob down, allowing the pin to be removed between the shell extractor knob and the barrel. The last pic (you have to look close) there is the slightest extension of the extractor rod when being pushed down. This was enough to cause the cylinder to jam. Now that I've learned how to take this apart, it's not as traumatic as it was, but it is a pain in the rear. You need at least three hands to do it right, and my wife refuses help.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    That gun has a base pin safety. It has two notches on the base pin. One notch is safe the gun will not function the other notch is fire. This is a "Swiss Safety".:)
     
  12. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

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    It does indeed have two notches. I didn't know it had an official name, thanks for telling me that. I was aware of the function, however, that was not the problem. When the cylinder pin is pushed all the way in, the hammer is physically moved away from the gun. So it is very visual when the safety is on and the gun doesn't go bang.
     
  13. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    gr8oldguy
    So you are saying that the ejector rod is always protruding like in your last pic?
    It should not. Something is not letting it return all the way. Weak spring, or a burr in ejector channel or something.
     
  14. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    O.K. When you push the ejector rod head "down" the cam slot forces it rearward slightly, so the protrusion.

    With the ejector rod head in its full forward position, the base pin should be held captive, that is, still retained in the gun's frame, but forward enough to clear the window opening in the frame and allow cylinder removal.

    Is this not the casde?

    Bob Wright
     
  15. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

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    The problem is with the design of the gun. The cylinder pin can't be removed unless you move the shell extractor rod knob down and out of the way of the cylinder pin. This is the move that requires an extra hand, because you have to pull the extract rod knob down while making sure you have a cylinder chamber to accept the slight intrusion of the extractor rod, while depressing the cylinder pin release knob. The instruction do not cover any of this. I think the gun was built wrong from the factory.
     
  16. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    Well, seems to me the obvious thing to do is remove the ejector assembly when removing the cylinder. Just one screw needs to be removed to do that. Then cylinder removal would be easy. You could probably find a base pin without the Swiss Safe feature to cure that problem. Or have your gunsmith shorten the base pin.

    Built wrong? No. Poor design, maybe.

    Bob Wright
     
  17. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

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    You're right. Poor design. I do love the revolver. I was just learning process figuring out that best way to break it down. To shorten the base pin enough to give it enough room to come out without moving the shell extractor rod, would cause the pin to be too short. I can live with it now that I have learned my hard lesson.
     
  18. towboater

    towboater Well-Known Member

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    It shouldn't be too short. Push it all the way in. measure or mark the part that sticks out. Cut it, and sand its edge.
     
  19. Long_Henry

    Long_Henry New Member

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    Howdy!
    Thought I might throw some info at this topic, even though it is a bit of an old post.
    My Wife and I are both cowboy action shooters, and she has three of these little guns--two Lightnings with 3 1/2" barrels and one Stallion with the longer barrel.
    We purchased these guns a long time ago, and Uberti has made some manufacturing changes over the years, particularly in the firing pin bushing and the firing pins.
    One of the two Lightnings we originally purchased had such a poorly fitted firing pin bushing the entire gun had to be replaced by Uberti. After that we did install lightened mainsprings in both and they shot perfectly. We picked up the Stallion used from a cowboy shooting Pard, and it too always fired flawlessly.
    Jumping forward about fourteen years and suddenly one of the Lightnings developed an intermittent light primer strike problem.
    In an attempt to fix the problem I installed a brand new Uberti factory mainspring--no joy, same issue. Next I miked the firing pin to see if it was on the short side--it wasn't (note: there are multiple firing pins available for about three different revisions of these little guns).
    So, I decided to shorten the inertia firing pin return spring, and cut about 1 1/2 coils from that stiff little spring in 1/2 coil increments hoping that the firing pin would travel farther yet still retract. This seemed to improve the light primer strike problem but the gun still wasn't 100 percent.
    In another attempt to determine what the problem was, I once again removed the one-piece grip and noticed that it was very hard to pull the backstrap and grip free. Upon further inspection I discovered that the Uberti standard mainspring was wider than the light mainspring we had been using all those years, and that the mainspring was in fact DRAGGING inside the one piece grip. A couple of minutes with the Dremel tool inside the wooden grip made all the difference.
    In summary, a way-too-old lightened mainspring put the little gun in trouble, and the "fix" was a new, standard factory spring, but that led to interference with the grip and the mainspring.
    Any way, all is good and the guns are running at 100 percent again.