Tumbling and Separating Dust

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Anch368, Sep 6, 2012.

  1. Anch368

    Anch368 New Member

    71
    0
    0
    So if you checked out my other post about gun room floor I will be tumbling and media separating indoors. I think it'd be a pain to run up and down stairs with everything to tumble and separate outside. The problem is that using my Lyman tumbler and the drum and bucket media separator it generates a lot of lead dust that I do not want to breathe in let alone coat the inside of my room with. I have tried the dryer sheets and that doesn't really help at all. The tumbler doesn't really create too much dust it's when I separate the media and brass that there's a huge amount of dust. I think I have thought of just about everything to remedy this. I looked into Ultra Sonic Cleaners but I don't want to complicate and lengthen how long it takes to clean brass especially because I don't care how shiny it is I just want it clean. I also looked at Stainless media which I think would also complicate the issue. I thought about building my own venting chamber to put everything in and tumble using an stove hood as the vent out the window but there has to be a simpler way. I am using walnut and corncob. Any ideas? Thanks again guys!
     
  2. MarkAD

    MarkAD New Member

    53
    0
    0

  3. beaglesam

    beaglesam Active Member

    1,936
    0
    36
    I tumble inside as well dust is so little I have never worried about it.
     
  4. Anch368

    Anch368 New Member

    71
    0
    0
    Thank you Mark AD this is definitely what I am looking for.. thanks!
     
  5. GaMatt72

    GaMatt72 New Member

    456
    0
    0
    I tumble and separate inside as well. I don't hardle have any dust to worry about.
     
  6. oldpapps

    oldpapps New Member

    173
    0
    0
    Toss a 'dryer sheet' in from time to time and lots of the dust will be removed when you take it out.
     
  7. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

    5,360
    3
    38
    How does tumbling brass create lead dust???
     
  8. GaMatt72

    GaMatt72 New Member

    456
    0
    0
    I guess there is a trace amount of lead from the powder and primer in and on them.
     
  9. oldpapps

    oldpapps New Member

    173
    0
    0
    That is a good question.
    Lets see.... carbon from the burning of powder - yes, crap from what ever the primer spits out - yes, dust from the brass proper - very, very little if any, dirt and other gunk picked up along the way, yep, lead or jacket materials - I don't think so.
     
  10. JD1969

    JD1969 New Member

    748
    0
    0
    This is what I do as well and it seems to work really well. As a bonus your brass comes out smelling like a spring day :) Actually I use old dryer sheets.
     
  11. 1hole

    1hole New Member

    293
    0
    0
    "...the drum and bucket media separator it generates a lot of lead dust ..."

    No, it doesn't. There is no "lead" at all in powder or cases, virtually no lead residue even from lead bullets or primers. Any dust you see is coming from the ground up corn cob or walnut shell media itself. If there was even a valid hint of risk from it our benevolent gobbermint/EPA masters would be attemping to control it and would have 2'x3' warning signs permanently affixed to tumblers.
     
  12. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

    11,488
    0
    0
    Of course there is lead dust. Don't be rediculous. You should wear a mask when tumbling cases.
    Besides, do you think breathing in brass dust, powdered corn cobb or walnut and powder residue is healthy?
    You think the EPA gives a sh!t if gun owners poison themselves?
     
  13. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

    5,360
    3
    38
    You have found a home w/ Obama. Scare tactics. That is a bunch of BS!! I stacked hay in barns for years, even stack mesquite charcoal. You are full of something that comes from the south end of a northbound mule.
     
  14. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

    11,488
    0
    0
    Ok. Well tumble away on a diaily basis without a mask and when you start getting headaches that aspirin won't get rid of you check back in.
    Never underestimate the power of airborne particulate.
     
  15. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

    5,360
    3
    38
    Started reloading in 1990. No head aches except from BS. Treat your media, you will be amazed how little dust there is. Definately no lead. I reload cast lead in 4 different calibers.
     
  16. 1hole

    1hole New Member

    293
    0
    0
    "Of course there is lead dust. Don't be rediculous. You should wear a mask when tumbling cases."

    "Brass dust"? Amusing joke or deep wisdom from Chicken Little?

    Please note I didn't say "lead dust" doesn't exist, only that it's so minute in anything reloaders do as to be irrelivant if we observe just a tiny bit of common sense - like don't lick your fingers clean after tumbling or bullet casting ... or picking your nose or scratching your fanny, etc. I was a professional industrial safety officer about 8 years so, yeah, I know very well that OSHA/EPA will go anywhere they can extend their gobbermint power hungry hands. But you do whatever it takes for you to be you feel comfortable. :)

    What kind of "mask" do you suggest for safety when tumbling cases? A 'mask' that would sctually help would require particulate cartridge filters and a decent one like that costs from $40 to $60, depending on how frightened you are. But it wouldn't matter at all unless you did tumble all day, every day, while holding your face a foot above an open top tumbler the whole time; few of us would actually do any of that, even you. I've been doing this stuff, including casting, for almost 50 years WITHOUT MASKS of any kind; my blood lead level is quite low. I may briefly have a mild headache about once every two years but I rarely take an aspirin for it. Even so, you may be right and it might all catch up with me someday... but not yet.

    Stay safe.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2012
  17. JonM

    JonM Moderator

    20,110
    12
    38
    get rid of the walnut totally and use straight corncob and your dust issues will vanish.

    i used to do that similar routine and had massive dust issues.

    ps. you guys play nice!! any further bsing at each other will earn some vacation time
     
  18. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    WRONG!!!!

    Almost all primers have lead. Trace amounts, sure. To say there is no lead at all is pure BS. Lead is a hazardous heavy metal. Regularly polishing cases inside CAN be a hazard to small children. Handling spent cases, exposed lead on bullets and shooting in confined spaces (indoor ranges) can be a hazard.

    Lead gets into our systems in three ways
    1. injestion. You eat it or eat after handling lead
    2. inhalation. You breathe it in.
    3. Absorption. in can leach through your skin. This is the least likely way to get exposed

    If you practice proper precautions you will be fine. Wash your hands thoroughly after handling ammo, cases or shooting.

    +100 on the dryer sheets. I tear one in quarters and run it with a batch of brass to all but eliminate the dust.
     
  19. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

    11,488
    0
    0
    I just want to put in a quick final word on this while avoiding to continue the fight or get on either side of it. Dust or no dust, lead or no lead. Science has yet to advance to the point of lung transplants. You only have the two you were born with. Better to err on the side of caution.
    (unsubscribing now)
     
  20. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    Lung transplants are being done. The problem with lead is your body mistakes it for calcium and deposits it in the bones. Bone becomes more brittle and the lead can continue to damage organs for long periods of time. Once it is there, it is difficult to remove.

    Exercise proper precautions and lead will not be an issue for you. I shoot, reload and cast bullets. I have my lead levels checked at my annual physical exam. I actually got mine DOWN over the last few years. I believe Metamucil aided in the reduction.