trucks all set for the big tow

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by bobski, Sep 12, 2013.

  1. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    had the 95 2500 checked out.
    come to find out dad had the big deal model. new trucks are called HD, but this one wasnt yet.
    it already has a factory tranny cooler in it, so im set to haul.
    had a new tire put on, ac is fixed, had all new rear axle u bolts put on, new brake lines, new tranny fluid lines, new rear brakes, chain anchor points were welded on, new trailer wires.....im loaded for bear.
    all i gotta figure out is if uhaul provides the drop bar for the hitch. i gotta get that load down level. anyone know if they do?
     
  2. ctshooter

    ctshooter New Member

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    No they do not. Also don't be surprised if you need to buy an adaptor for the trailer wiring when you get the trailer. Uhaul uses several different types of plugs depending on the age of the trailer.
     

  3. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Can you set them up on water skis and tug a little on Kalifornicate?
     
  4. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    where do you get one of those offsets?
     
  5. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    cant use a offset on a ball.

    ok, next question...can a 3/4 ton carrying its max bed load still tow its max tow load?
     
  6. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    I'm all ready to rock and my car's all ready to roll. And it didn't cost me nearly as much to get my car in tip top shape as it did for you to get your truck all fixed up.
     
  7. MOshooter

    MOshooter New Member

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    Bobski good luck on your travels to Missouri.
     
  8. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    is it common to have springs resting on the axle when towing? im maxed out.
     
  9. rockratt

    rockratt Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Don't do it!!!!!!!!
     
  10. alsaqr

    alsaqr Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Very good advice.
     
  11. F4U

    F4U Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The springs always lay on the axle, they are bolted there. On the other hand if the frame is laying on the axle you got problems. :eek:
     
  12. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    well as it is...i got 4" between the rubber and frame with the trailer hooked and loaded. uhaul says the leafs tighten up as they max out so im good. thanks guys.
     
  13. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Pics man! This could be funny.
     
  14. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    whats funny about a guy trying to keep from being killed on the road?
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2013
  15. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Ask Frogger.
    ;)

    I was meaning pictures of your springs maxed out.
     
  16. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    gotcha.........
     
  17. Tell_Sackett

    Tell_Sackett New Member

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    Well how much gap is there unloaded?:rolleyes:
     
  18. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    5 or 6............
     
  19. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    made it! easy day. no problems at all. thanks for everyones help.
     
  20. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    To answer your question Bobski, no. What you need to do is open the owner's manual for your truck, and look up it's GCVWR (gross combined vehicle weight rating). If you do not have the owner's manual, this information is on the sticer on the inside of the door frame that also has you tire size on it. This is the maximum load you can carry, and it is based on the weight of you truck, the weight of the trailer, the weight of the driver and passengers, and the weight of your cargo. Also check the weight ratings listed on all of your tires. If this number is lower than that of your ruck, do not exceed the wieght rating of the tires. You can get their combined weight rating by adding the rating of all 4 tires together. Exceeding this number can lead to broken parts, and will shorten your trucks life span.

    Using my 1992 F-150 as an example, i have a 6,000 pound tow rating, with a 9,350 pound GCVWR, an unladen weight of 4,750 pounds, and a gross vehicle weight rating of 6,000 pounds. My utility trailer weighs 990 pounds with a gross weight rating of 2,990. Trailer tougne weight is also something to keep in mind. tounge weight is 10% of the total trailer weight. i weigh 240, my wife is 170, the dog is 76 pounds, and I carry 275 pounds of cap and tool boxes at all times.

    Step one, Combine all the weights of your load, vehicle, trailer, and passengers. Step two, subtract that number from your GCVWR. This will tell you how man additional pounds you can add to the truck or the trailer. If it is higher than your GCVWR, remove enough of the weight to be under that number.

    Hope this helps.