Tru Oil question

Discussion in 'Engraving & Refinishing' started by DarinCraft, Jan 14, 2011.

  1. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

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    Question for CA357 or anyone who might know. I recently stripped a walnut stock down completely and my only experience with Tru Oil is is on a stock that was stained.

    Will Tru Oil give any coloring/stain at all or will it only seal and gloss?
    This is what the stock looks like now.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2011
  2. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

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    I have resized these photos I don't know how many times and cannot get them any smaller...sorry mods
     

  3. BillDeShivs

    BillDeShivs Member

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    It will darken the wood, like it's wet.
     
  4. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Yup, it will darken it a bit and it will highlight the grain.

    I apply the first coat with my fingers and make sure it gets well into the pores of the wood. I steel wool (00 grade) it in between coats and find that usually three coats is enough.

    If you want it shiny, apply it a bit heavy, for matte, a touch thinner. After the last coat, I again hit it with steel wool (0000 grade this time) and then buff it with a T shirt. More buffing = glossier finish.

    I'm sending a PM.
     
  5. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    some say cut the first coat 50/50 with paint thiner. Rub it in really well and keep it wet for 30 minutes. then let dry wet sand it then apply 3 more coats and then let dry and wet sand and repeat. Till you get a nice smooth finish with all the pours filled.
     
  6. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

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    Tango, just saw your response. Didn't mean to ignore you bud. My buttpad is supposed to be here tomorrow and I'll grind it later this week. So the oil will go on this weekend. I was looking at the pores and they look pretty deep. Do you thin the oil down so it penetrates better or so it doesn't trap air in the pores?
     
  7. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Warning: some steel will may break and leave pieces imbedded in stock. Any moisture (read storage neglect) will highlight those pieces.
     
  8. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    I haven't done the cut thing myself. I hear is soaks in better so I am assuming that it allows it to fill the pores better.

    Also remember that if this is a laminate stock truoil will darken the wood....
     
  9. 50of4064

    50of4064 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Filling in the pores

    The Tru-Oil will fill in the pores but only after a WHOLE bunch of coats. Don't think that the oil will fill in the pores in just a couple of passes . Some take and sand the Tru-Oil in with 500 gr wet/dry, the idea is the sanding particles mix with the oil and help fill in the pores. ( filling as you go. ) This can be a long and laborious process. But... some feel it a better finish.

    I have used a filler and then sanded, then start to oil and it cuts down on the number of coats to get to a flat surface, then rub in the rest of your coats to desired finish.

    Good luck with it and send some finished photos

    Dennis
     
  10. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

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    Oh I will. I just got the buttpad and I need to grind that, then start oilin'
     
  11. Nozzlehead

    Nozzlehead New Member

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    When wet sanding this way; are you using tru oil on the sand paper for the lubricant? This is what I'm assuming but when I assume...well you know what happens:rolleyes:
     
  12. 50of4064

    50of4064 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    That would be a Rodger That:D
     
  13. Nozzlehead

    Nozzlehead New Member

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  14. 50of4064

    50of4064 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    just a thought

    Before I started in on my 1st walnut stock, I went down to my local woodworking haunt and procured a 2"x2"x 18" or so long piece of walnut that had the open pores , not unlike my stock, and practiced on it first and worked out the bugs on it before I tried it out on the stock.

    Hope this helps.

    50of4064
     
  15. 50of4064

    50of4064 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Well.....how did it turn out?

    Photos please!!!!!:)
     
  16. alpha11

    alpha11 New Member

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    The sapwood of walnut is creamy white, while the heartwood is light brown to dark chocolate brown, occasionally with a purplish cast and darker streaks. The wood develops a rich patina that grows more lustrous with age. The wood is generally straight-grained, but sometimes with wavy or curly grain that produces an attractive and decorative figure. With that being said I'd like to suggest "sapping" the stock with acetone before rubbing the tru-oil on. Acetone opens up the pores and would allow the oil to penetrate better into your stock. I work at a cabinet factory as a stain sprayer/finisher and thought I'd throw my 2 cents in. Hope it helps you out!
     
  17. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    Always great to receive advice from the experts, thanks. I never knew about the acetone trick.
     
  18. BillyHart

    BillyHart New Member

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    Thanks for the info.
     
  19. BillyHart

    BillyHart New Member

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    What do you use to get the high gloss finish with tru oil
     
  20. BillyHart

    BillyHart New Member

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    As far as buffing . Compound flitz.?