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What kind of modifications can be made to the trigger of a firearms and why?
Just wondering if some triggers are better for shooting or if trigger mods are only done for the aesthetics?
 

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I'm sure many others will chime in.

Got a particular rifle in mind, for altering the trigger?


I'm no gunsmith, not even of the "shade tree" variety, so I let a competent gunsmith crack open the thing and do his/her magic.

On pistols I've had a variety of guns where I've had a trigger job done. In a couple of cases, to specifically add weight to the trigger, while smoothing everything up. On several rifles, I've had after-market triggers installed (again, by a gunsmith knowledgeable about the rifle platform).

In all cases, the goals were: to improve safety; to improve reliability; to eliminate scratchiness and grittiness, smoothing everything up; and in the case of target rifles to ease the ability to "cleanly" and repeatably fire the round.

On a rifle, it can make quite a difference in repeatable accuracy, to have a better trigger. In one case, a Remington 700 SPS Varmint, I had a Jewell trigger installed. Eliminated all creep, was amazingly smooth, broke "like glass," and allowed adjustment between 2oz and 16oz (depending on which spring installed). Cut target groups in half, just with the new trigger, as compared to the factory XMark trigger. A bit less effort, a "clean" break, and you can end up with being "surprised" by the trigger break when it does happen, as opposed to having to deliberately "force" the trigger to break. (Better accuracy that way, in my own experience.)

Of course, in older rifles there might well be slop, creep, gritty movement ... things a decent trigger job can help clean up. In many rifles, there are after-market trigger options that can transform your accuracy and improve the safety and reliability. Definitely worth considering, depending on the gun you're speaking of.
 

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I'm with Jerry Miculeck on triggers. I shoot all of my guns with the trigger they came with. If you can do that and hit what you aim at, you're a better gunman. I can hit a tree rat at 60 yards with a Gamo trigger. Try that sometime.
 

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I don't know what kind of aesthetic alterations you would do to a trigger. There are valid reasons for some very accomplished shooters to have triggers fine tuned, most of us mediocre shooters would not benefit from such changes. We need to be working on stance, hold, breathing, grip, front sight/back sight, and trigger pull issues.

However, most trigger work done by someone who is not a well trained gunsmith will end up needing to go to a well trained gunsmith to fit and replace new parts. You can take a file or a Dremel to triggers and sears and make them down right dangerous. The old line from the cowboy movies, "Be careful lady, that gun has a hair trigger" comes to mine.

And, by the way, if it is good enough for Jerry Miculeck, it is good enough for me. Although, on the internet, I taught him everything he knows. ;)
 

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Pretty well covered. A trigger is often defined by how it feels, creep, over travel, weight of pull, smoothness, etc. Target rifles benefit from having a lighter trigger pull. Removing creep and over travel makes the trigger feel better and more manageable. Smoothness is a feely thing too. The issue you have to watch out for is safety. You might be able to adjust the factory trigger (the ones that are adjustable) down to low pull weights, or Bubba Backyard might claim he can polish that factory trigger to make it light and smooth, but they can be dangerous (i.e. closing the bolt quickly or banging the buttstock may release the sear and that's dangerous). That's why the good after market triggers are pricey, they cover all the feel good stuff and manage low pull weights (some down into the ounces) while mataining good lock up of the firing mechanisms and won't fire with a simple jolt of the rifle.

Now, with that said, you don't want your carry pistol to have a hair trigger, because that is dangerous too. Some peeps will tell you a carry pistol shouldn't be any less than about 4lbs on the pull. There are some exceptions, such as a DA/SA (Double action/Single Action) where the firearm is carried with one in the chamber, but the hammer is down (decocked). The first shot requires a full double action pull of the trigger (meaning the hammer gets cocked as part of the trigger pull). DA on an auto pistol is typically fairly heavy, 10 or 12 or more pounds pull. Once fired, the hammer is cocked by the action of the slide and all subsequent shots are single action. In this case, a lighter single action pull might be ok, but I'd still keep it up in the pounds range. Most factory pistol triggers are north of 5 lbs, and some are notorious for a lot of creep, gritty feeling, over travel, etc (primarily auto pistols in these cases). After market triggers for these are like the triggers on the rifles, they eliminate or remove most if not all creep and over travel, they provide a nice smooth feel and a consistent pull weight. One other factor for auto pistols is known as the "reset", when you touch off a round, you don't have to let the trigger travel completely forward, it will reach a point somewhere short of that where it "clicks", this is the reset and the gun is ready to fire again at that point. Peeps that are good at fast shooting learn to control the trigger so that they only let off to the reset. From reset to sear release is a lot less travel of the trigger and trigger finger, so less "jerking" of the gun by hand movement. After market triggers can also clean up the reset to make more consistent as well.

Also too, there a couple types of triggers (rifles), 2-stage and single stage. You have to decide which you like.
 

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I don't know what kind of aesthetic alterations you would do to a trigger. There are valid reasons for some very accomplished shooters to have triggers fine tuned, most of us mediocre shooters would not benefit from such changes. We need to be working on stance, hold, breathing, grip, front sight/back sight, and trigger pull issues.

However, most trigger work done by someone who is not a well trained gunsmith will end up needing to go to a well trained gunsmith to fit and replace new parts. You can take a file or a Dremel to triggers and sears and make them down right dangerous. The old line from the cowboy movies, "Be careful lady, that gun has a hair trigger" comes to mine.

And, by the way, if it is good enough for Jerry Miculeck, it is good enough for me. Although, on the internet, I taught him everything he knows. ;)
Some people like skeleton triggers but I don't see them as having any value in any way.
 

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Some people like skeleton triggers but I don't see them as having any value in any way.
When looking to replace the plastic trigger on a 1911, because I don't like plastic on guns, I read that skeletonizing them made them lighter. Yea, so what? I wonder who in the hell could tell the difference in the weight a few grams would make. I think that their real value is making them look all tacticool. I see that Wilson pokes hexagonal holes in theirs, now that is cool.... I replaced mine with an old fashion, small, all steel trigger and now I am all happy, and as far as I can tell, the gun doesn't know the difference.
 

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Hmmm. I guess I'm not very "tacticool". I just have plain old guns. They work. Really well. I'm not really a fan boy of having "expensive stuff" hanging off of, on, or about my guns. They're just guns. They just shoot and go bang and pretty accurately at that. My spousal unit recently inherited a Browning patented, Belgium made .32 ACP made in the late 1800's. Once I get it taken apart and cleaned up (it's actually in very good shape) and figure out how to take pics of it and post them, I'll post it up here. I'm not very "technicool" either.
 

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Skeletonized triggers allow evil people to attach evil gun parts (shoe laces) to the trigger turning their guns into evil machine guns!
I would have thought that that would have taken a rubber band, shows my lack of mechanical skills.
 
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There is nothing nicer than a competition firearm with modified trigger. I generally don't carry a modified firearm tho. First time I shot competition with my modified comp gun, I had a "safe" ND, as it still hit the target, but surprised me. Discovered I had a habit of pulling through the takeup while shooting. Since the wall was substantially lower force, I had too much pressure on the trigger.
 

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What pistol you shooting for competition? When you say you had a habit of "pulling through the take up", do you mean after a shot you are just letting off enough for the reset, or are you just taking up the creep to vigorously?
 

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What pistol you shooting for competition? When you say you had a habit of "pulling through the take up", do you mean after a shot you are just letting off enough for the reset, or are you just taking up the creep to vigorously?
taking up creep to aggressively. Big difference between assumed 5lb pull and 2lb pull XDm 5.25 9mm. Reset was way back, and after thousands of rounds, had developed a bad habit. I've since taught myself to let off just enough to reset.
 
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