Triangular Barrel

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by FCross7, Sep 30, 2009.

  1. FCross7

    FCross7 New Member

    1,015
    0
    0
    To some of you this may be old news as it came out in 2008, but I just saw something about it. It's the Remington 700 VTR, this thing has a triangular barrel. As far as I know(in my limited knowledge of firearms), this is the only one with a triangular barrel, but I could be wrong. I'm not planning on getting one or anything, just curious about it. Anyone know any pros/cons for it? the only advantage I can see is that it has more surface area that a round barrel, so it's gonna cool faster. Anything about it I'm missing?

    -Fred
     
  2. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

    23,972
    1
    0
    It's not new. Check out the picture in my signature. I have had that barrel since 2002 on my .308.

    Has a top, 2 sided muzzle break that keeps the gas from venting down, and into any grass or dirt, and keeps the muzzle on target.

    I don't personally believe the light weight barrel is as accurate as a heavy barrel would be.

    Remington is jumping onboard a platform that has been out for years.

    Why?

    I have no idea.... *shrug*

    JD
     

  3. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

    3,250
    0
    0
    What's next? A triangular bore? Wasn't there something in the 70's that shot electrically discharged triangular bullets called "trounds"or some such nonsense?
     
  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,343
    214
    63
    Trounds were plastic cartridges with a roughly triangular cross section, but a round hole in the center that held the round bullet. Made for the Dardick automatic revolver, I have one .22 Tround and one .38 Tround. They use a standard small pistol primer.

    HOWEVER- going back to 1872- Mr. Otto Schneeloch (no, I did NOT make this up) patented the .307 Schneelock revolver. The cartridge is triangular in cross section, and is fired thru a triangular bore, which turns as you go up the barrel. Imagine cutting an orange in half, and note how the sections fit together- like triangles. Same principle with Otto's revolver.

    My nominee for top 10 weird guns of all time, and #1 weird name.

    Boy, does THIS post give spellcheck a workout!

    PS- for all that are certain that old C3 is pulling their leg again, here is the US patent: http://www.google.com/patents?id=s0...gbs_selected_pages&cad=2#v=onepage&q=&f=false
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2009
  5. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

    19,847
    3
    0
    I don't know if the triangular barrel is really any better, but I like the way it looks. :cool:
     
  6. jeepcreep927

    jeepcreep927 New Member

    1,105
    0
    0
    Remington's triangular barrel is nothing more than a marketing gimmick. A triangular barrel actually reduces the cooling area which in turn does not dissipate heat as well as a round or round fluted barrel, and more importantly, makes the barrel less rigid.

    If it's a cool factor thing than I guess it looks different, but functionally it's a step backwards.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2009
  7. orangello

    orangello New Member

    19,156
    0
    0
    I remember reading about these as a way for the weapon to cycle faster somehow, but it never made 100% sense to me.
    Dardick tround - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia