Trap Shooters ?

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by Harleygunner, Jun 4, 2012.

  1. Harleygunner

    Harleygunner New Member

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    A fellow retiree and I recently did some trap shooting, he used to shoot years ago, and I'm just learning. I did shoot a few rds of skeet many yrs ago, but not trap. To make long story shorter, we've both joined a local skeet & trap club, and since my old mod 50 20 ga Winchester wasn't up to the task, I bought a new CZ o/u Canvasback.
    I didn't want to spend a lot of money until I am more into the sport, (in case it don't work out). Anyone familiar with CZ's ?
    I researched what I could find, and it seems these Turkish made guns have good reviews. It seems to be of pretty good quality, good fit and finish. It shoots well too. I got it at Cabela's, $600.
     

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  2. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    It should be a good shotgun. I have a DeHaan which is made in Turkey and the quality is really good. I think there is nothing wrong with Turkish guns.
    cottontop
     

  3. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    My buddy just picked up a dehaan for skeet. Nice gun.
     
  4. unclebear

    unclebear New Member

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    not to be an *** but most of shooting clays is the person behind the gun not always the gun but sometimes it can be. I use to shoot with a winchester single shot full choke and didn't do to well as there was my uncle who had a $800 benelli and he couldn't hit the broad side of a barn if he was kissing it.
     
  5. Gonzilla

    Gonzilla Active Member

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    Yeah, some people have problems w skeet shooting. Picking your head up or failure to keep the barrel moving are very common. Good equipment makes the job easier and great equipment is a joy to use.

    Baretta, Browning etc, are expensive but they hold their value.

    I say, be different and shoot a Rem 1100 28 ga Sporting Edition. Great for skeet, not sure about trap but very easy on the shoulder.
     
  6. Harleygunner

    Harleygunner New Member

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    Yeah, I've shot my buddy's 1100, and it's sooo much easier on my shoulder than my O/U. I guess with a better recoil pad, and time, it will get a little more comfortable.
     
  7. Gonzilla

    Gonzilla Active Member

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    Rem 1100 are classics - I've got a Ducks Unlimited 11-87 in 20 ga and it is easy on my shoulder as well but no where near a 28 gauge. Only problem w 28 ga is the price of ammo.

    O/U still reign supreme - no one likes to have to pick up their shells later. O/U - Easy to clean plus simplicity & reliability go hand n hand. Tube sets allow users to switch gauges at will - Wish I had one ! But when it comes to recoil mgt, autos w good recoil pads are second to none.
     
  8. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    As far as an O/U and recoil goes, just go to a lighter load; via reloading that is. As far as the cost of 28 ga. ammo, once again, reloading solves the problem. About picking up shells, some clubs don't even allow it. If it hits the ground, it is theirs.
    cottontop
     
  9. PrezidentGrant

    PrezidentGrant New Member

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    I would agree that its completely the shooter behind the weapon.
    I'm 16 and just started shooting Clays this year. I had previously been a rifle person and still am but wanted something different.
    I use a 60 year old 870 Wingmaster Magnum with a 30 inch Fixed Full choke, the but pad dried up decades ago and is now hard as a rock but I am now shooting 3 Dram 1 1/8 Oz. Loads all day and am consistently shooting 24's and 25's.

    Suffer Patiently...
    Patiently Suffer.....
     
  10. deg

    deg Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Wow! You DA Man! Stick with it partner!
     
  11. Virginian

    Virginian Active Member

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    The only O/U I have ever shot that I can even say I liked was a little Beretta 28 gauge. I did own a Beretta O/U but I couldn't hit a barn standing inside it with that gun, but the guy I sold it to is still happy many years later. I held a CG 28 gauge and it felt good too. I shoot clay pigeons with an 1100 in any gauge but .410, and have no desire to own one of those, period. As for picking up hulls, I need the exercise. If I am lazy I use a magnetic stick.
    If you are happy with your gun, that's all that matters. For registered trap, most people prefer a dedicated trap model that prints high.
     
  12. yazul42

    yazul42 Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    My wife is a dedicated trap shooter,, I myself will shoot a round every now and then to get my eyeballs ready for bird hunting. Those folks that are serious about the sport really dump some coin into their equipment and it really can make a big difference in scores, getting the guns properly fitted and adjusted, which in itself is pricey, much less the cost of a dedicated trap shotgun but even I can tell the difference in shooting a field gun vs. a trap gun.
    The wife started of with a little field gun to see if she really wanted to continue the sport,, she moved up to Browning BT's and now shoots a Kreighoff and truthfully her scores reflect using a better gun. Basically it's like someone customizing a rifle or pistol for competition or hunting. The better you and your equipment work together, the better you both perform, just depends on how much one wants to put into the sport, be it clays or targets.
     
  13. windjammer69

    windjammer69 Member

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    There is a whole lot of expensive Trap guns out and Browning and Beretta (as far as new guns go) are not them. Krieghoff, Seitz, Blaser, Kolar, and Perazzi those are some "EXPENSIVE" Trap guns.
    But you get what you pay for.
    Look for the features that you want or think you need. You will find that a gun with all those adjustable things on them are harder to shoot if you are not a very good shot already.
    Start with a good tried and true Trap gun. Bare in mind many shoots will be 100 round or more so a lite weight gun with a lot of recoil will began to ware you out. An auto ( Remington 1100,Winchester SuperX2 or a Beretta)will help withstanding all those shots in the beginning. Then when you see that you can shoot well then move up.
    There are several things that newer guns have to help reduce the recoil and they do work, so look for a newer gun. A lot of the "old" guns where built for the old paper shells, and when you shoot new plastic shells they have very harsh recoil.
     
  14. gvw3

    gvw3 New Member

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    The CZ is the only inexpensive turkish gun that comes recommended by experienced clay shooters. They seem to hold up well. After a year or so you will want to move up to a better gun. I recommend the Browning BT-99. This is a dedicated trap gun and it will improve your game. It did mine. They can be had for $1100 used to $1600 new.
     
  15. BaconBuddy

    BaconBuddy New Member

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    Remington 1100 I feel is a great trap gun it don't kick to bad and the new 1100 competition has no recoil I shoot 100 + every weekend and don't feel it. Its not to Expensive ether out the door where I buy it cost 1300 with a life time warranty through the gun shop
     
  16. CourtJester

    CourtJester Well-Known Member

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    Trap for fun is really up to personal choice. I have a $3000 browning Citori. Oddly enough, I can shoot 23-25 with that or my Remington 870. Have to aim a little different with each. But the gun doesn't make the shooter. Being comfortable with it and knowing where it shoots does though.


    Sent from my iPhone using Firearms Talk
     
  17. indy36

    indy36 New Member

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    Along the way I had a CZ Ringneck Target side-by-side in .20 GA and it was a great gun. It had choke tubes, 28-inch barrels, single trigger, case colored receiver, and nice engraving details. It always went 'bang' and was a joy to shoot. I wish I still had it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2014
  18. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    the difference between a good gun and a great gun is how well it works after 50,000 rounds.
    if it needs to last 20 years or 20 days....that determines how much you spend on a gun.

    and too, you must ask yourself whats at risk if your gun stops working. is it a 100,000.00 purse or a car? or just the pride of beating your buddy in his back yard off a 10.00 hand flinger.
     
  19. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

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    and after reading of all the shotgun pros that posted here, i cant believe you guys didnt sign up for the ftf skeet/trap shoot 4-5 oct!
    theres even a sticky about it up top of this forum!
    you are all invited.
    pack your guns and come!
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2014
  20. replacement

    replacement New Member

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    People ask me questions, I shoot a Beretta 471 with a wood butt. It is a true field gun and people are surprised I can shoot with that stick. After all trap shooting was supposed to be practice for bird hunting. The SxS just seems wrong to some of the serious shooters.