Transplanting a small tree.

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by texaswoodworker, Jun 19, 2012.

  1. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    About a year ago, I used a supposedly dead stick that fell off our pecan tree to fix our crappy gate. I think it was maybe a couple feet long at the time, so I just stuck it in the ground. Well, it wasn't dead, and turned into a tree. :confused: It is already about 5 feet tall, and it is growing pretty fast.

    We decided the we want to keep it, and it needs to be moved since it is right next to the gate, our house, and the neighbor's house. What would be the best way to do this, and what time of the year should we do this?

    Thanks
     

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  2. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    Pick a spot with similar lighting conditions to where it is now. Just dig the hole and drop it in with the dirt it is in now, pack it down a bit and water.
     

  3. TimKS

    TimKS Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Wait until the tree looses it's leaves, then move it with as much of a dirt / root ball as you can. Water to settle the dirt and keep it water for the first year or so.
     
  4. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    My wife is a horticulturalist. She has told me that moving trees is often dependent on the type of tree. Some are best to move in the spring. Others are best to move in the fall.

    I suggest you contact the local agriculture extension office.
    http://agrilifeextension.tamu.edu/

    They should be able to tell you everything you need to know.
     
  5. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Timk had the best reply imo with my experience. If that tree is that hardy break another stick off, plant it and water away. Early spring or late fall is best, watering is important.
     
  6. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

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    We love plants and gardening. It is our experience, though, that you must be careful how many trees you have. You didn't really plan on having an extra pecan tree, so are you sure you even want another one?

    Craigslist is good for giving it away if you would rather not just dig it up and toss it out.
     
  7. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    Thanks for the advice guys. I looked into the best time to transplant a pecan tree, and Feb-Mar looks like the best time. I don't think it will grow enough to be a problem by then, so I'll just leave it for now.

    Well, we have two pecan trees in the back, some other kind of tree in the front, and just enough room for one more in the front. I think it would be nice to have one more in the front. It would help keep the house cool, and lower a few bills. Plus, FREE PECANS!!! :D

    Also, is it odd that I am horrible with plants, yet I can stick a stick into the ground and have it turn in to a tree?
     
  8. big_blue79

    big_blue79 New Member

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    Look on the bright side, come harvest time with 3 full grown Pecan trees(later on down the road) you'll have a little money in the pocket for Ammo if you sell the Pecans:)
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2012
  9. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    My dog usually gets to them first. :( He doesn't even eat them. He just chews on them, and spits them out.
     
  10. big_blue79

    big_blue79 New Member

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    Mine eats Hickory nuts.
     
  11. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    What kind of dog? I usually need a hammer to open one of those.
     
  12. big_blue79

    big_blue79 New Member

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    Golden Lab mixed with IDKWTF.
     
  13. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The fruit on the outside of the nut is edible, too. When I was in Jamaica I found a security guard eating the fruit, and we had a short conversation about food.

    Transplanting is successful in the fall, wait until the leaves drop to transplant. Just be sure to water, the tree may be dormant but the roots are in growth mode. My rule of thumb for watering a transplant is every day for two weeks, then 2-3 times a week for awhile after.
     
  14. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    Do it all at one time in Feb-March as you were told. I grow nut and fruit trees, chestnuts from seed, and that is when you do bare-root trees. Dig up as large of a root ball as you can, then dig the hole where you plan on planting it just a bit deeper than the root ball. There should be a basin of sorts about 3 feet in diameter (you can make a berm to achieve this) around the trunk. Then fill the basin with mulch.

    If the soil won't allow you to get a root ball then just make sure that the roots are not packed together and none of the roots are turned upwards (J-rooting). Pack the soil tightly to remove any air pockets.

    The mulch and water basin are critical for the first year. Don't over-water though or the tree will not develop enough deep roots, especially critical in dry climates like Texas.