traing thought...

Discussion in 'Training & Safety' started by jjfuller1, Jul 7, 2014.

  1. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    training thought...

    so this crossed my mind today. and i thought id see what you thought.

    for defensive or tactical training often instructors will say to add dummy rounds randomly in a magazine. this is supposed to help you train in the event you have a misfire or some sort of malfunction. i do think this is something that would be good to know. now my thought also came to this. lots of people reload there ammo due to how much they train, or shoot. so the situation i had in my mind is...

    your at a defensive training event going through drills with malfunctions. you are using reloaded ammo. well we all make mistakes and instead of a dummy round you actually encounter a problem.. a squib...what do you do? and how should we prepare for this?

    often we preach if any malfunctions happen to check the barrel before continuing. but with that in mind we are also training to clear malfunctions and resume firing.

    so again i say.. what would happen in this scenerio?

    i myself couldnt think up a good answer. other than im probly buying a new gun that day...
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2014
  2. Mercator

    Mercator New Member

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    There is no need to use reloads for defensive purposes. They are for targets and plinking.
     

  3. MisterMcCool

    MisterMcCool Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Back up


    No offense and none taken
     
  4. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    life is on the line click no bang, rack the slide try again.

    if your just training click no bang check the bore before loading a fesh round.


    guns that i rely on for self defense get complete spring overhauls at the first sign of wear or rough cycling. or every couple thousand rounds.

    depends on the malfunction, if it recurs after re-building with fresh springs i sell it and get a new one.

    i do a LOT of handling but i use factory ammo for self defense. its not that i cannot assemble ammo that works perfectly, its the fact that the primers i use have been on the shelf for a while or sitting in transit or in a warehouse under unknown conditions. this means its possible to have them corrupted by humidity. factory ammo doesnt tend to have this issue since the time between assembly and primer creation is much shorter.

    last weekend i went to the range with the scar17 and ran into about 30 rounds that had corrupted primers. how they became that way i dont know. but it happens with handloads.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2014
  5. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    your missing the point. this is a training situation. you are shooting at targets..

    if a gun explodes in my hand i doubt i'll reach for a backup.. but good input.

    you have a decent grasp at what im asking... its training... training to prepare yourself for the real thing. so how would you handle it?

    training is to help you with many things. muscle memory, awareness, speed and accuracy and the list goes on.

    for the training to be effective you need to move at your most proffiicent speed. stopping during training would defeat the purpose of training for malfunctions.

    i know its a what if type of question, but i found it to be pretty interesting to think over.
     
  6. Mercator

    Mercator New Member

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    Sorry, I meant defensive training as well. I do not want to risk a squib or a kaboom while practicing for self-defense. By shooting targets I meant traditional scoring, in this context.
     
  7. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    well if you want to train for failure drill just load up some dummy rounds no powder no primer mix them in with the regular ammo.

    however, i think its better to train with safety in mind as the occurance of a squib is exponentially higher than a failure during a self defense situation...

    if you train army style S(lap)P(ull)O(bserve)R(elease)T(ap)S(hoot) at some point you ARE going to get a squib and hard coding that into muscle memory and you end up doing this...

    this clown was employing SPORTS and he kaboomed himself on a squib.

    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oh1lyMyejpI[/ame]

    i think your better off training stoppages and examining the bore before proceeding. once you get familiar with a firearm and you have a sd situation and you have a stoppage your not going to disassemble the firearm or range rod it. thats a little obvious.

    if you want to train catastrophic fail put an empty in the mag.

    personally i do not go out of my way to train fail drills. its taken me years to get SPORTS to stop being muscle memmory.
     
  8. 7point62

    7point62 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I'd never bet my life on reloaded ammo. That's just me. In SD I want performance-tested high-quality factory loads. If you get a squib in a firefight and you don't have a secondary, there's nothing you can do. A misfeed, a stovepipe, a jam you can clear pretty fast but catastrophic fail isn't something you can immediately correct. While I understand the importance of training to clear a malfunction, why would catastrophic fail even enter into a "tactical" training scenario? You see what I mean? The weapon is dead. Your training is supposed to prepare you for the real deal. When the SHTF your options are severly limited. McCool is right...blown off fingers from a squib you still better have a backup. That's why God gave you two hands.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2014
  9. kott

    kott New Member

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    Rely on hand to hand at that point. After all, you still have a beat down stick (or hammer) :)

    But in all reality, cycling the weapon and firing again IF its a no sit life or death situation is probably the best idea. I mean, yes you will destroy your weapon, but I would think one of the projectiles will still leave the barrel, even if at a much lower velocity. That should still be enough to injure somebody...