Too reload or not to reload... 223

Discussion in 'Mini-14 Forum' started by Tenderribbs, Apr 22, 2012.

  1. Tenderribbs

    Tenderribbs New Member

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    Is it worth A mans time too reload 223 I've saved alot of brass and my second question is how do I know I'f the brass that i have is reloadable?









    So that others may live.
     
  2. Shade

    Shade New Member

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    First question.
    Very much worth your time to reload .223.

    I purchase bulk bullets (Hornady 55 gr. FMJ-BT) for ~10 cents a piece.
    Primers are ~3 cents a piece and powder runs me ~8 cents per round.

    That's 21 cent per reload for components if you own the brass already.

    Generally, factory .223 is ~50 cents per round; bulk deals will can get you
    down to ~40 cents per round.

    Second Question.
    If your brass is really brass, it is reloadable; steel cases are not reloadable.




    Also you can tailor your round to better fit your rifle and application
    v. factory ammo.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2012

  3. Tenderribbs

    Tenderribbs New Member

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    Thanks shade

    I have really been going thru some 223 lately . Ive aquired the black gun disease just purchased a colt AR a mini14 and a M&P AR223 so I'm eating thru some ammo. I guess the main expense is the press? Then u can probably spend as much as u want to accessorizing I presume.




    So that others may live...
     
  4. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    If your JUST starting out, the start up costs may seem insurmountable. But after buying press, dies, scale, measures, case length guides, trimmer, etc etc etc....you will NOT save a damn dime....because you will be shooting more!;)
     
  5. linuxuser3890

    linuxuser3890 New Member

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    Give us a number of how much you shoot per month, it will help to better answer your question. Also a lot of the reloading equipment is used for other calibers. So if you have any others that you shoot a good amount of, that may also help justify the purchase.

    Sent from my Inspire 4G using FirearmsTalk
     
  6. Shade

    Shade New Member

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    If you go to the Ammo & Reloading forum here on FTF alot of material is
    already posted on this subject. I am not going to cover all of that here.

    When you are new to reloading, I strongly urge to start with a single
    stage press. Take the time to learn the process. When you are confortable
    with the process then make the move to a progressive press for your high
    volume ammunition.

    Lee has a good starter kit for just over $100 it has all the common
    equipment for starting. You will need to add to that; dies and a case
    gauge for trimming cases. So for about $150 you can be reloading ammo.
    Case cleaning will be something you can add later.

    Starter Kit.
    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/121744/lee-challenger-breech-lock-single-stage-press-kit

    .223 Dies.
    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/434975/lee-pacesetter-3-die-set-223-remington

    Case Gauge.
    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/10...nd-shellholder-223-remington?cm_vc=S014434975

    As you assumed, you can accessorize all kind of toys to your reloading set up.
    The big jump is getting into progresive presses. I have several progressives.
    But I still spend alot of time on my single stage units, all my big rifle magnums
    are still loaded in a single stage. 12 ga., .357 Magnum and .45 ACP are
    loaded via progressives. I also do a semi progressive operation with my .223;
    all sizing, case prep and priming is done single stage/manually, but I drop
    powder, seat bullets and crimp on my progressive press for speed.

    But reloading your own ammo open a whole world of options that factory
    ammo just cannot give you.

    And you say that like it is a bad thing... LOL :D:p
     
  7. ryguy00

    ryguy00 New Member

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    I'm all set up with the equipment needed to load .223/5.56. I have everything I need EXCEPT brass. That, I'm running dangerously low on at the moment. If you decide not to reload and wanna get rid of some of that extra brass, please let me know!
     
  8. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    LMAO!!

    THAT depends on who you ask....and unfortunetly in my house, since getting yougest and wifey hooked on shooting, I dont get to shoot more....i just get the "joy" :rolleyes: of reloading more, so THEY can shoot more.
     
  9. Tenderribbs

    Tenderribbs New Member

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    Thanks for the feedback if I could get a starter kit for a 100 that Ain't bad and I have been shooting about a couple hundred rounds a month and I dont see me slowing down anytime soon! Thanks shade that was alot of info that will keep me busy for a While. The only caliber that I will be reloading is the 223 with a little 243,




    So that others may live...
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2012
  10. Shade

    Shade New Member

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    I had the same issue, my 2 boys love to shoot, they are 10 and 13,
    guess who is learning how to reload now... I started them on shotshells
    the 13 year old is being worked into metallic now.

    In addition, all of Lee's equipment works, some better than other some not.
    But Lee will get you in the basics for a very good value and you can then
    decide to what to upgrade and when.

    You can add a set of dies and case length gauge and and you are set for .243.
     
  11. tri70

    tri70 New Member

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    Reloading is addictive! You find a great load that your rifle loves and you can't quit shooting! I reload for my mini 14 and found a great load, I love to shoot! I have taken it out to hunt deer, coyotes, prairie dogs, hogs and lots of paper killing! Once you get the brass trimmed, its good for several loadings, just polish and prime, load again. I love to test new bullets and powders, I need to get out today and shoot some new Varmit and Varagedden hp in 55 gr!