Too hot to handle, really.

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by Vincine, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    Are just fired handguns too hot to handle? I wouldn't expect a slide to be hot as it's not the barrel. What about the brass? What about a revolver's cylinder and barrel?
    ???
     
  2. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    It is my experience, as limited as it may be, that a few rounds through a pistol or revolver will leave the barrel and chamber pretty darned hot. It's quite an 'explosion' that happens in those casings and after shooting off several in fairly rapid succession, yes, it gets hot.

    And I take it you've never had the experience of a casing from a just fired round flying out and going down your shirt. HOT!!!
     

  3. JohnJak

    JohnJak New Member

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    A very strange question but who am I to say.
     
  4. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Yep and the more, the hotter!

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNAohtjG14c]‪Burning AK47 - 300 Rounds & on Fire‬‏ - YouTube[/ame]
     
  5. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    it depends like a lot of things gunwise. 50 rounds through my ruger 22/45 and its warm but you can hold the barrel in your hand. takes about 60 rounds to heat up the slide of my 1911 so its unpleasent to hold. my python 6 or so really heats it up. casings are almost always unpleasently warm.

    semi-auto pistols heat up slower than revolvers mainly because the hot cases stay in the gun longer and the action stays contained unlike the semi-auto the ejects the spent cartridge quickly and venting the hot gases faster than a revolver.

    the amount of material in the gun also has an effect. a desert eagle will heat up slower than a smaller semi auto due to the sheer mass of the weapon.

    semi auto brass when ejected tends to be way hotter than brass from a revolver as semi auto doesnt spend much time in the gun transfering heat.
     
  6. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71otDYb6Pm4&feature=related]‪hot brass‬‏ - YouTube[/ame]
     
  7. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    Okay. So, no low cut blouses. Got it.
     
  8. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    Actually, I haven't had the experience yet, either. But I've seen it happen to others. And after I shoot a cylinder full of rounds from my revolver, those casings are HOT when I try to take them out of the cylinder. The semi-autos are spitting them out at you.

    As my shooting partner said, his wife had a hot casing go down her top and she burnt her "jigglies". I'm still laughing..........not that she got burned but he called her breasts "jigglies". I also noticed when I went shooting with this guy, he gave me the position in the lane to his right. So his casings were flying at me and he was not in any danger of hot casings. Way to go, Jon!!!!!

    Personally, I wouldn't wear sandals to a range, either. I always wear athletic shoes and socks. t-shirt, long pants.

    But for the men, I recommend them to shoot shirtless so if a hot casing comes at them they don't have a shirt on for it to get stuck in. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2011
  9. Gatekeeper

    Gatekeeper New Member

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    Since this turned into a hot brass discussion, wearing a baseball type cap is also a good idea. The brim will help keep brass from falling and getting caught up between your safety glasses and your eyes.
     
  10. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    Why would you let it catch on fire? seems a little destructive to me.:D

    The caliber that you are firing has a lot to do with how hot the gun gets too. I can fire 100 rounds of .22 lr through a rifle and it get slightly warm where as if I fire 2 or 3 rounds of .30-06 (the high powered stuff) throught my Remington, the barrel gets too hot to touch.

    Here is a little advice for new shooters, never and I mean never try to catch your spent 30-06 brass to show off. It hurts and I know from experience. The only thing I got from this experience other then some teasing is a lesson in how powder+contained explosion within a cartrige=heat:D
     
  11. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    I think George Harrison summed it up..."Happiness is a warm gun." ;)
     
  12. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    A firearm is basically a nitrate burning engine, with a free piston (the bullet) The more gunpowder you burn, and the quicker you burn it, the hotter it gets. I have gotten bad 2nd degree burns from 7.62 NATO brass from an M60 machinegun going down my sleeve. 10 rounds thru a .22 auto pistol- warm. 6 rounds of max load .357 through a revolver, hot. 5 round quick fire thru a light barreled .308, scorch your fingertips.
     
  13. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    Baseball cap, crew neck, long pants, socks & sneakers at the range and don't try to catch the brass. I think I can remember that when my permit comes through.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2011
  14. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    What burns on guns? The paint? I didn't realize they were painted. I thought black was the color of the metal's surface treatment.

    Wouldn't firing that many rounds through a submachine gun at one time warp the barrel or something? Are they designed to dump heat as well as a regular machine gun?

    (I don't really know much about guns, just a few things about design.)
     
  15. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Most important, a baseball hat. Most folks wear shooting glasses, but without a hat a case can drop between your eye and the glasses. I've seen it happen.
     
  16. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    An AK is not a sub gun.
     
  17. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    Some guns are blued, some are parkerized, and some are duracoated (basically paint)

    I watched the video again and I don't think it was the finish on the metal that was on fire. I think it was the synthetic stock.

    As jpattersonnh said, an AK is not an smg, it is an assult rifle. the difference between a smg, machine gun, and assult rifle is that a smg fires pistol rounds, an assult rifle fires rifle rounds from a magazine, and a machine gun fires large (like .50 bmg) rounds that are fed into the reciever with a belt.

    Firing that many rounds through one and allowing it to get that hot can damage the barrel. During WW2, there are numerous accounts of machine gun teams carrying extra barrels because they would get so hot that they would overheat, bend, and warp. This problem was solved by preventing the machine gun from firing at it's max rate of fire so that the barrel was less likely to overheat.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2011
  18. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Most firearms are "air cooled", meaning that the handguard/ forearm has vents for air to move around the barrel, and carry away heat.

    But they are not meant to be used as a firehose. Yes, trying to do so does not do the firearm any good, and will damage barrel. Usually, in videos like the one mentioned, you see the synthetic or wooden handguard that has soaked up oil/grease/cosmoline ignited by the heat of the barrel.

    Weapons that are meant to be fired at extended high rates (such as a belt fed MG) have heavier barrels, or (like the M60) provided with a spare barrel (change time about 1.5 seconds if yer good).

    At one time some MGs were water cooled- there was a jacket around the barrel that held water, which would be turned to steam, keeping barrel temps down. Modern high rate MGs have barrels that use advanced metalurgy, and may have a liner of a special material- such as stellite (steel alloy with cobalt, nickel, etc)
     
  19. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    Just to add to what C3 posted, the earliest machine gun, the Gatling gun, actually had one of the most efficient means of cooling the barrel during sustained fire. By using multiple barrels each one has a chance to cool while the other 5, 6, or 7 are in use. The basic design is still in use today in the MIDI gun and the A-10 Warthog's devastating 30mm Vulcan, aka The Finger of God.