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Is that a Ruger?
 

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Part of me would want to shoot it. The other part would not want to risk tarnishing such a fine looking revolver. I would suggest taking it to a gunsmith and having it inspected before shooting it. It probably hasn't had a round down the barrel in sometime.
 

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You are the only one who can decide if you should shoot it or not. Might lower the value a hundred or so. If you think you would enjoy shooting it then shoot it.
 

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If it were mine, it would stay in the case and continue to look pristine.
 

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I won't own a gun I won't shoot. I like bling too. I'm one of those, that if I had the money, I'd get the fanciest, prettiest guns ever made, and I'd have to put a few down the pipe. Maybe not every range trip, but you'd better believe it will get shot at least once. In some cases, depending on the gun, ONLY once.

That's the category I would personally put yours in. One full loading. Six shots. Then I'd clean it, gently and with tender loving care before putting it away again.

Now, if that were a .44 mag (I assume its .45 Colt? Never mind, I reread your post) I'd have to shoot that SOB as often as possible just for the "holy sh!t this is cool!" Factor.
 

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The value of commemoratives, such as your, is based on unfired condition. Shoot it, and you have the lesser value of a shooter. If it is unfired, choose wisely.
 

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It sounds like you are (and rightly so) going to keep that in the family.

Would it make a difference to you if you pass along a firearm that was not shot outside the plant, or one that was?

What's a couple of C-notes on a family heirloom?

(If you do decide to shoot, have it checked out first. Also get as much documentation as you can. Write a letter on who gave it to you, the history of the firearm to include the serial no, and have the letter notarized.)
 

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If there is no doubt the gun has never been fired I would not shoot it. If it is obvious the gun has been fired I would have fun with it. Provided you don't handle the gun in a rough manner it won't hurt a thing.

I have a pair of Colt Diamondback I had not shot in years. When I did decide to shoot them I had to take them to the shop before I could shoot them. The barrel was loose on the 22LR and needed the cylinder gap set properly. Everything about the cylinder on the 38 spl was gummed up. The guns appeared to be in new condition. After 15 years in the safe both guns had canabalized for lack of a better term. The repairs cost less than $120 and both guns really looked like new when they came back from the shop.

Many people would have tried to fix these guns on their own. Unless you have all the proper tools to work on a revolver it's best to leave repairs to the pro's. Every screw you disfigure and every mark you put on a gun devalues the gun greatly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Since, I do not plan on selling the gun, I am going to have to share the joy for shooting this thing with my son. Thanks for everyone's input, I plan on bringing it to a gunsmith this week for a general lookover. I'll give you a report after we go shoot.:D
 

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I would take into consideration what news you get from the gunsmith before you make a final decision on shooting the pistol. Unfired the gun might send one of your kids to college. You don't know about gun values in the future. I never thought one of my colts would be worth anything when I got them. After all what could a gun be worth that was only worth $159 at the time of purchase.
 

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Think about what John Deer said. And if you shoot it, give us a video.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I would take into consideration what news you get from the gunsmith before you make a final decision on shooting the pistol. Unfired the gun might send one of your kids to college. You don't know about gun values in the future. I never thought one of my colts would be worth anything when I got them. After all what could a gun be worth that was only worth $159 at the time of purchase.
John_ here is a little bit about the pistol

Manufactured in 1979 in a limited series of 3,000. The top of the barrel is marked with one line address, "NED BUNTLINE COMMEMORATIVE" on the left, and " COLT NEW FRONTIER S.A.A. .45" marked on the right. Left of the frame is marked with the two line, three patent dates followed by the Rampant Colt. Fitted with a raised ramp front sight, adjustable rear sight, and checkered Rampant Colt/Federal Eagle grips. Complete with wooden presentation case lined with maroon velvet, and features a commemorative plaque and six nickel plated dummy cartridges. The issue price was $895 with todays auctions selling the guns for $900-1200.
 

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Aw hell, I'd make it my daily carry.
 

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HELL YES YOU HAVE TO SHOOT MAN! but take it to a professional for a once over first.
 

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Apparently the Ned Buntline didn't get the benefit of Felton Perry using one in a movie. The value of the diamondback was jacked up due to the popularity of the movie Magnum Force.
 
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