Thoughts on the Chiappa Firearms 1911-22

Discussion in '1911 Forum' started by theferg2000, Nov 27, 2010.

  1. theferg2000

    theferg2000 New Member

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    I was at the gun show today, and needing a big 22 for plinking and to help train my brother in law and his fiance (that is afraid of guns, but wanting to learn and get her CCDW). So i came across a new Chiappa Firearms 1911-22 for a little over $200.

    I picked it up,and took them to the range this afternoon. It did great, was accurate, and served it's purpose well. It had problems chambering the cheap .22s, but not a single issue with the high velocity stuff. ANyone know of a good cheap high velocity .22 that would work well in this gun, or just any general info at all? I will get some pics up of it.
     
  2. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    unfortunately with 22lr even the exact same model only 1 digit different will sometimes like one brand better than another. best way to figure it out is buy several liekly brands in 50 round boxes and try it. its just the nature of shooting 22lr. for training i like to use 22 lr ammo that has trouble and mixed in with the good stuff so i never really know when a failure happens. really helps on the clearing drill.
     

  3. theferg2000

    theferg2000 New Member

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    Thanks for the tip. With the cheap stuff, it did not chamber even once (was a cheap box of 500 that did fine when i used my Walther p22), so it will likely guarantee a failure for drills.
     
  4. kenhesr

    kenhesr New Member

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  5. theferg2000

    theferg2000 New Member

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  6. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    As a retired toolmaker, the GSG is hands-down, the best workmanship of what's currently offered. The barrel is pinned, and screwed to the frame, but is easily removable for cleaning There's a good review of the gun here.... Review: GSG 1911 - INGunOwners You can see on the pic of the right side, the barrel pin, the slide stop pin (in the middle) and the barrel retaining screw. The gun has very close to the same weight, feel, and balance of a full sized 1911, and the controls are in exactly the same place. I ran 550 rounds thru it without cleaning it, with two failures to fire, and those were good firing pin strikes, but the rounds did not fire. (bulk pak ammo) Accuracy was good, 2" groups at 30 feet off of sandbags. The pistol handled high velocity (Fed bulk pak) as well as standard velocity (Wolf Match Target) with no issues.

    Take down tools and chamber brushes are provided. For those who are so inclined, the barrel is threaded for a suppressor, and comes with a thread protector.

    80% of the parts interchange...

    Barrel Bushing
    Front & Rear Site
    Hammer
    Trigger
    Grip Safety
    the Whole Main Spring Housing
    Thumb Safety
    Sear
    Disconnector
    Sear Spring
    Grip Panels (but not the screws because they're in metric)
    Mag Release
    Sear Pin
    Hammer Pin
    Plunger Tube
    Plunger Spring

    I have NOT tried to interchange all these parts... just sayin'.... this is hearsay from a stocking dealer.
     
  7. 007BondJamesBond007

    007BondJamesBond007 New Member

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    I had good luck with the Wally World Federal 550 bulk pack. It said high velocity on the box. We shot the stuff from a Ruger target pistol and it put a 1' grouping from a Ransom rest. I do have a Marlin 795 that didn't like the stuff when new but after putting 500-1,000 rounds through it it loosened up. I was surprised it did better than the Ealy target loads.
     
  8. PTsouthpaw

    PTsouthpaw New Member

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    +1 on the Federal Bulk pack. I have one gun that prefers this ammunition, even to more expensive options like Mini-Mags. Like others have said, try a variety, see what your gun likes.
     
  9. theferg2000

    theferg2000 New Member

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    JamesBond007 and PTsouthpaw - thanks for the info on the ammo. I will try it and let you know.

    Jay thanks for such a great review, and great info. Man why couldn't you have called and warned me before. I mean to i need to start running all my thoughts by the forum BEFORE i do something? Where's the initiative :D ???

    Almost forgot my pic. Not the best - used my phone.
     

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    Last edited: Nov 28, 2010
  10. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    its always good to get opinions. long as you dont base your decisions solely on what someone else says. i ask for opinions from time to time and what i look for is things i didnt think to look at. if what i see in a product jives with other people's opinions then i got an answer.
     
  11. theferg2000

    theferg2000 New Member

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    Just thought that i would add a little info i found for anyone in the future that may have problems with their Chiappa 1911-22 not ejecting and not feeding. The gun should not be dry fired. One guy had similar issues that i am having and he said that he sent the gun away, and the company said the gun had been dry fired at the shop (before he bought it - as he did not dry fire it). I have not dry fired mine, but did not know the signs to look for. He said to look at the barrel, and there should be an indention if there is dry fire damage. I have to say it does not look to me like mine has it, so hopefully just putting about 500 through it will loosen it up. Hope to know tomorrow.
     
  12. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    I have a PPK/s in .22lr. Had to run high velocity through it until it was broken in. Now it runs any .22lr. Break it in and keep it clean.
     
  13. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    As a good rule of thumb, NO rimfire gun should be dry fired as the firing pin will hit the steel chamber rim and cause damage...
     
  14. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    In the spirit of providing information.....

    Head space on a .22 cal rimfire is on the order of .040"-.042". If the firing pin in a rimfire is a few thousandths too long, it may impact the breech face, and peen it.... resulting in metal being moved into the chamber mouth. If this impact occurs enough times, failure to feed, or extract may result. A decent gunsmith can remedy this problem very quickly, with special tooling.

    Some rimfires are designed to be dry fired. The Ruger MkII for example, requires dry firing as part of the re-assembly/function check process. Owners manuals sometimes indicate if dry firing is harmful, but not all address it. If you're not sure, either don't dry fire, or call the manufacturer to make sure.

    This image is of a .22 cal barrel viewed from the breech end. The damage caused by the firing pin is visible at 12 o'clock on the chamber mouth. This particular barrel still functioned properly, but different barrels may, or may not function with the same degree of damage....... In an attempt to stay on topic, My GSG firing pin does NOT impact the breech face, but that may not hold true for all GSG 1911's.
     

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    Last edited: Nov 29, 2010