This primer... No, that one...

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by enfield1, Jan 9, 2014.

  1. enfield1

    enfield1 New Member

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    Yes folks, another newbie question…
    This time, about primers.
    I have been reloading shotshells for a while and have decided to delve into reloading brass.
    Recipes for shotshells are very specific as to what components one must use. For example; I f I use Winchester 209 primer with powder ‘X’, I must use wad ‘Y’. If I change the powder or the wad, I could end up needing Federal 209A primers.
    However, except for using the correct size of primer (Sm. / Lg. Pistol, Sm. /Lg. Rifle and the magnums), I am not seeing that using a specific manufacturer over another with given powders is critical.
    I have the Hornady 9th Edition, and under any given cartridge they list a specific primer with several different powder options. Hodgdon will list several powders but does not call out a specific primer. I am still waiting for my Speer manual.
    So, is using one manufacturer’s primer over another, with a given powder critical, or is only the size of the primer the critical issue?
    Thanks, in advance, for your advice.
     
  2. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Brand doesn't matter in most cases just the type. Some brands aren't building primers quite the same as others. Shotgun loading isn't as interchangeable brand wise as metallic cartridge. But in general common mainstream brands like winchester federal etc will be the same. Long as your sticking to the right type as in 209 or 209a etc.
     

  3. enfield1

    enfield1 New Member

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    JonM, Thanks for the info. In re-reading my post I see I didn't make it clear that I was asking about brass reloading. I was assuming that a Small Pistol Primer from one manuf. is about the same as a Small Pistol Primer from another and I think you confirmed that.

    As I said, I have been reloading shotshells for some but I still don't really know the difference 209 and 209A - but I load some that have to have Win. 209 and others that have to have Fed. 209A.

    I just didn't know if, in brass reloading, the different manufactures were interchangeable but, again, you confirmed that they pretty much are.

    Thanks JonM
     
  4. jebsca

    jebsca New Member

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    Some manuals will tell you that they tested with one brand or another, but the important thing is the size (small or larger), type (pistol or rifle) and magnum or not. As you work up a load, you will need to stay with the same primers. If you change primers (can't get what you like?), you will need to rework up your load. I have read about people finding that changing from the primer they "have been using for years" and helping the accuracy of the round.
     
  5. mseric

    mseric New Member

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    In metallic pistol and rifle loading you will never, never match all the components listed in the Manual exactly.

    Use whatever primer you can find as long as it fits. Use whatever bullet you wish, just use data of Same Weight of Same Construction.

    These variables are the reason why every manual lists a start charge and a max charge. It's up to the handloader to work up his/her loads safely.

    BTW Hodgdon does list the primers used in their tests. Just click on the "print" tab at the top right of the page.
     
  6. Hawg

    Hawg Active Member

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    Different brands have different hardness. CCI's are hardest followed by WInchester, Remington and Federal. If you have a gun with lightened springs you may need Federal. Some people have reported having Federal primers explode in press priming setups.
     
  7. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    i tend to use magnum primers for all my metallic loading. however if a load calls for magnum primers DO NOT use standard primers or you may get partial igniton or even worse a hangfire.

    hangfires are the most dangerous type of malfunction and kill people. gun goes click person wonders WTF?!?!? starts jockeying the gun around and BOOM shoots someone by accident or themselves.

    a hang fire is when there isnt enough ignition and the primer is burning powder but not enough pressure as been created to launch the round but its still chugging along very slowly until enough powder gets ignited to cause it to go off like it would normally some seconds later. hangfires can cook for as long as several minutes.

    hangfires are why i will never use remington ammo or primers again. ive had numerous hangfires with remington factory ammo and with remington primers. remington just makes incredibly shtty ammunition nowadays. they used to be a gold standard ammo but the last 5 or 6 years complete crap.
     
  8. enfield1

    enfield1 New Member

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    Well whadya know!!! Thanks mseric!!
     
  9. KG7IL

    KG7IL Well-Known Member

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    I have several loads* where I use known powder and weight, known bullet, type and weight.
    If I reload these, I seldom worry about the make of the primer as long is it's the same type. For Example: Small Pistol Standard.

    *Since I am running near the starting load - to mid range, I am comfortable with my method. Others may not like my method.

    Certainly if I were loading near maximum, I would reduce the charge as I test a 'new' primer.