This just in to my shop

Discussion in 'Blackpowder & Musket' started by Tim Nalley, Jul 26, 2020.

  1. Tim Nalley

    Tim Nalley New Member

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    While I am a gunsmith am not a firearms historian. Does anyone know what these proof marks mean on the stock of this musket?
     

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  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Hi Tim- welcome! Glad you found us. Right oof the top of my head- not a clue. Do you have pictures of the complete gun?

    Just a note- those of not proof marks. Proper term is cartouche- and there were stamps used by different inspectors where the gun was made- and can be much more varied than a govt proof stamp.
     

  3. Tim Nalley

    Tim Nalley New Member

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  4. Tim Nalley

    Tim Nalley New Member

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    Thanks for the help. The barrel is approx .438” dia. and 39.25” long. I don’t see any marks on the metal just on the stock.
     
  5. Tim Nalley

    Tim Nalley New Member

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    One more shot
     

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  6. towboater

    towboater Well-Known Member

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    Nice looking rifle. Hope someone can help ya
     
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  7. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Tim- you've got me. Is the bore smooth or rifled? I ask because that has the lines of a fowling piece (shotgun) more than a musket- and the barrel walls are very thin- but the measurements you posted would be a very small bore gun. If you pull the barrel and the lock, there may be markings concealed from view, protected from wear.
     
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  8. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The symbols are very similar to ones that appear with crop circles. This might be what advanced civilizations used for weapons several thousand years ago.
     
  9. Tim Nalley

    Tim Nalley New Member

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    Yes Bore is smooth. I agree it does look more like a shotgun (fowling piece) than a musket. I pulled the lock and barrel but didn’t see any marks.
     
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  10. Tim Nalley

    Tim Nalley New Member

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    I do believe you may be on to something.
     
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  11. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    The 'lettering/cartouches' looks like Siamese, but I could be wrong, of course

    Have you checked to see it it is unloaded by running a suitable length of dowel down the barrel and checking it against the outside length to the nipplehole?

    You might be unpleasantly surprised.

    BTW, proof marks are applied to the barrels and breeching of any gun submitted to proof, not the woodwork. The idea of proofing is to ensure the safety of the pressure-containing parts of a gun, not the decorative add-ons.

    EDIT - An expert off gunboards tells me that it's Siamese.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2020
  12. Tim Nalley

    Tim Nalley New Member

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    Yes I did check and it is not loaded. The longer story of this is, this was donated to the American Legion by a woman who’s husband made great claims of its value and he has since passed away. The American Legion is trying to determine it origin and worth. That’s where I came in (as you can tell I am not qualified but figured someone out there would have some clue.) Any idea of its value?
     
  13. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    I live in UK most of the time, so I'm not one to advise on US prices, but here in UK such an item would rarely make more than around $250 as a wall-hanging curio.

    More information for you to stow away and and use sometime - a 'musket' of any kind is a military long arm.
     
  14. Tim Nalley

    Tim Nalley New Member

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    Any chance your expert friend could give me a ballpark guess as to when this thing was built?
     
  15. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    I don't need an 'expert friend' to tell me that it was built between ca. 1860 and whenever it was acquired by the original American owner. However, most people going to Siam/Thailand/Burma/Mynamar don't go there looking for things like this to bring back. Is it possible that the late veteran served in Vietnam of Laos? Still, even then most people were happy to get back to the US intact, let alone encumbered with a five-foot long BP shotgun.
     
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  16. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    The last 'symbol' is the Thai for number '5'........
     
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  17. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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  18. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Im just mentioning the lock and hammer style are not that common.
    Just mentioning a couple types exist in North America that had the same style.
    Just odd as this took place in the golden age of caplocks.
     
  19. Tim Nalley

    Tim Nalley New Member

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    So the Thai stamp on the stock took place in 1969 when Thailand allowed its citizens to bring in their illegal firearms and have them serialized. While the firearm as obviously in Thailand and registered there it doesn’t necessarily mean it’s origins were there. I have disassembled the firearm and found no stamps or marks on the barrel or inside the lock. Looks like this will remain a mystery.