thinking of starting my own business

Discussion in 'NFA/Class 3 & FFL Discussion' started by Ultimate_sig, May 3, 2013.

  1. Ultimate_sig

    Ultimate_sig New Member

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    Im thinking of getting my FFL and my class 3 to start my own business and um curious....

    Is it difficult to operate a small lathe with no experience?

    Im thinking of building or rather creating a new sound suppressor system. I will spend quit a but of time as R&D but eventually I will have a product to sell.

    My second ? Is would a small table top lathe work for what I want, perhaps a grizzly model?
     
  2. hiwall

    hiwall Active Member

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    Yes it is.
     

  3. Olympus

    Olympus New Member

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    You've got several fairly large obstacles to conquer in this scenario.

    1. Simply getting a FFL is no small feat. You may look into the process and realize that you'll never be able to get your license due to zoning restrictions, etc.

    2. You're wanting to produce a product in which you have little to know experience producing or possibly even knowledge of the subtleties of operations. I predict you'll spend a HUGE amount of money in wasted time and materials simply trying to design something from scratch using machinery that you have no experience using.

    3. Unless you're using CNC maching, your production as a one-man shop using one small bench top lathe will be extremely low. The chances of you selling enough finished products to recoup all the money wasted during "R&D" are very slim and would probably take years.

    4. People are machinists by trade. It is definitely not impossible to teach yourself, but you're talking a significant time investment just to learn how to properly operate a lathe and to calculate measurements in fractions you didn't even know existed before.

    5. And provided that you're able to conquer all the above hurdles, you'll still be a small shop with relatively low production, so you'll constantly have to keep marketing your business so you're not forgotten about.

    I don't mean to discourage you, I'm just trying to be realistic with you. I have a HUGE entrepreneurial spirit myself. I have thought of starting my own businesses before I ever graduate high school. I learned the hard way that 99% of them were pipe dreams. But nobody really sat me down and explained all the hurdles. That being said, I currently have a full time career and also operate two different businesses that are relatively profitable. I ended up scratching countless business ideas before I found one that worked for me. My advice is that you keep trying until something fits. The best place to look is in areas of your life that you already have knowledge and/or skill. That will eliminate several hurdles right off the bat.
     
  4. Ultimate_sig

    Ultimate_sig New Member

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    Can you give me some advice, or some friendly cretecing
     
  5. Ultimate_sig

    Ultimate_sig New Member

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    Thank you for that. So I guess before I dive into this I need to get my feet wet. Get a trade and then a part time as an operator. I just want to do something different. I've worked in bars for the past 6 years and it's getting old. I want to do something were I can grow. I can't really move up or do what I want because my tits aren't big enough if you catch my drift.

    You haven't popped my bubble you've just help me create a mental timeline for the next few years. For that I thank you and respect your advice for putting things into aspect.
     
  6. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    Sig, first thing is what about start-up capitol? starting any new business from scratch is going to require a huge influx of capital to get started.

    next, right now with the current economic climate and the political adminstration, now might not be the best time to start this type of venture. even firmly established gun shops are having a hard time.

    where do you plan on doing business? have to consider zoning. if you can't do it at home due to zoning, that means renting or buying a shop that would allow for you to such business. with that, there is going to be rent or mortgage payment, utilities, taxes and ect.....

    then you need the proper equipment to do what you want to do. as mentioned, slow production rate equals low income on products. the Grizzly you mentioned, though a good product, not for mass production though. then trying to start into a market, that already has proven players that have been doing it for many years, well that's going to be a huge obstacle to overcome, if you do.

    nothing wrong with having a desire and a dream, but there are realities that need to be addressed if they are to be realistic.
     
  7. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    Running a lathe isn't particularly difficult, it's just complicated.

    You have to be very careful, until you get very familiar with the

    machine, to be sure to remove very small amounts of metal from the work

    piece.

    You would really want training, or mentoring until you were fully

    aware of proper balancing, mounting, setting speeds, feeds,

    properly fabricating and adjusting bits, etc.

    Then you're back to square one with Olympus's observations.

    Perhaps if you sought to work in a shop which makes the

    items you were thinking of making, it would give you

    some closer insight.
     
  8. Ultimate_sig

    Ultimate_sig New Member

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    I think im going to go to school for it and get a trade then a job as a cnc operator or programmer. I have a little experience with auto cad but it's been so long it might help to take the courses again. Thanks for the advice and starting my own business right now is not the way to go at this time.
     
  9. BillM

    BillM Active Member Supporter

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    Now that's starting to look like a plan:)

    You also might check out the local community colleges and see if
    they offer a basic machine operation course. Grab a small lathe and
    build a couple of suppressors (with the proper paperwork BEFORE
    you start making chips)

    A usable suppressor is well within the capabilities of the fairly
    skilled craftsman. A state of the art suppressor? Different
    critter. Now you get into CNC milling centers, wire and sinker EDM,
    and machining my favorite metal I love to hate-----Titanium.
     
  10. Ultimate_sig

    Ultimate_sig New Member

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    Yea I'd like to do that. Id like to re-invent the suppressor and fix the little problems with them or make them better.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2013
  11. AR10

    AR10 New Member

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    You don't buy a McDonald's in most cases first thing, most people put in time burger flipping a few years and work their way up.

    A no apprenticeship business venture is like sticking your hand into a spinning blender.
     
  12. deadsp0t

    deadsp0t New Member

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    It's best to start as a 'hobby' if you will.
    As a young adult I wanted to get into Motorsports like drag racing.
    My mother, a successful small business owner of almost 30 years explained to me that I needed a job or career that would support my dream. She suggested becoming a mechanic or engine builder to reduce costs by doing stuff in my own or in the shop I worked in, this also allows an opportunity to gain a reputation.

    Not sure where you're at as far as a job/career goes but this maybe something that can help you gain experience, access to tooling/tools and possible future clients.

    Where there is a will there's a way.
    You need a solid step by step plan from start to finish, and a solid business plan once you get to the finish(having your own business). Make your plan, make it solid and stick to it and know there will be hiccups along the way. Most important is staying with it.
    Good luck sir.
     
  13. Ultimate_sig

    Ultimate_sig New Member

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    Yes that's why um going to go to take a course and start a job working cnc, then work my way towards programmer and so on and so forth
     
  14. johnr1943

    johnr1943 New Member

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    Keep your day job. :D
     
  15. WebleyFosbery38

    WebleyFosbery38 New Member

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    No bubble busting, just reality as the others offered- Even Small lathes definitely can make giant gaping flesh wounds and put holes in people and things that are truly undesirable! Also, machine operators arent Metallurgists without advanced training nor do they design the tooling or cutters for the machines they are working unless they are "Toolmakers".

    That said, there is nothing but learning and taxes that will stop you from your dreams, if you take them both by the horns you can be spinning metal into product in your own shop in a relatively short time. I wish you good luck!
     
  16. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    Worlds deadliest jobs............

    As soon as I can relocate the pics I have of a man that was caught up in a lathe, i'll send them to you..........It might change your mind when it comes to running machinery you know nothing about..........
     
  17. WebleyFosbery38

    WebleyFosbery38 New Member

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    Word up...

    That said, watching someone who knows what they are doing making big metal small is a beautiful thing! A good friend of mine is a Sr Toolmaker and he can make the old Bridgeport's sing like a concert! I can sit and watch for hours, just dont touch anything or you will get slapped. A thang of Beauty for sure!
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2013
  18. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    Your last thought...........

    Ya, Beauty and the Beast. I can't say how many times I allmost bought the farm when doing work on manual machines. I've had razor sharp cuttings wrapped around my neck many of times, and my legs. Threading is a nitemare when the shaving is comeing straight for your hands and your at the end of the cut. And old faithfull, forgetting the wrench in the chuck.......Ouch.....And worst of all, having to work for someone that buys junk machinery and expects nothing but the best. So what the lathe doesn't have a stop button or braking system. It wasn't untill my later years that I started to tell my wannabees. If you don't know how to get out of the situation and you can, RUN......And don't come back.................:);)
     
  19. Ultimate_sig

    Ultimate_sig New Member

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    Thanks man
     
  20. gearhead396

    gearhead396 New Member

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    Ultimatesig....I went to trade school after high school and became a auto service tech. I worked for a shop for 2 years and then started my own mobile auto service. As of right now it's going ok but I don't have the capital I need to expand. I am talking to my parents now about investing and they are seriously considering. But why I'm saying this is I wish I would have had the capital lined up first. It would have made everything so much easier so before you do anything get that CASH locked down.