Thinking about becoming an NRA instructor.

Discussion in 'Training & Safety' started by Budasac, Jun 4, 2014.

  1. Budasac

    Budasac New Member

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    I figure I can make a little extra cash doing something I enjoy. A friend already got his certification and wants me to partner up with him. We belong to a private club that has offered us the meeting room and private use of the range for classes in exchange for discounted classes for members and free classes for members children (must be a group though). So, it's a great deal as far as a facility goes.

    I was wondering if anyone else here teaches NRA courses and if you have any comments/advice.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    I did it, and highly recommend it. I have no time to teach classes, but as you said it can wait till I retire. It is a lot of responsibility, and the NRA does not take it lightly. They suspend Instructors and Counselors all the time based on their students' feedback.

    Down the road you will need excellent communication skills, the endurance to do it 8 hours a day, liability insurance (on you), and a ton of A/V and printed materials. If you are successful, it is a moderate but steady income, and the demand right now is overwhelming. There hasn't been a better time to do it.
     

  3. Budasac

    Budasac New Member

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    Thanks for taking the time to respond. I want to do it for my own education and was hoping to just make enough to recoup my training costs at least. I have a friend who recently got certified and he want to pair up together for classes. So that would at least take some pressure off throughout the class and lessen the logistical burden somewhat. It would also allow us to do larger classes since we have the facility available to us.

    I'm just hoping I can get some new shooters safely involved in our sport and have some fun doing it. If I can make a little money then that's just a bonus.
     
  4. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It is worthwhile if only for what you personally learn from it.

    I have had my certification for six years. I go about it differently from your intention, I only teach two students at a time at my home range. I charge quite a bit more for the training than the gunshow classes, but I have never had a student that didn't think that they got their money's worth. It is a lot of fun and it provides me with gun and ammo funds.
     
  5. FernandoTheCommando

    FernandoTheCommando New Member

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    Do you need some type of extra insurance to teach at a home range? I live in the north east so "home ranges" are virtually non existent unless you go to new Hampshire. Is your range just a set up in your back yard or did you need a building permit and extra home owners insurance?
     
  6. FernandoTheCommando

    FernandoTheCommando New Member

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    And, do you need a business license or do you just so it free lance and claim the extra income on your taxes at the end of the year. Only asking because I too have been thinking about getting certified but the few ranges we have already have instructors who are well established at those ranges. Maybe i could teach at home and then use the local range to qualify my students?
     
  7. Budasac

    Budasac New Member

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    Unfortunately there are no backyard ranges here in Jersey and most places here charge $25 per person per hour.

    Since we have a facility, but only limited days that we can shut it down for our purposes we figured larger classes would be the way to go. I would think 6-8 would be the preferred class size to make it worthwhile for us and still keep the student/teacher ratio down around 3/1 for the most part. We have to try to make the most of what our club is offering us. I don't really plan to make much money from classes. I just figured it's another excuse to go to the range and spend time with others who are interested as well.
     
  8. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    And that is a good enough reason.

    If I were tying to do it to make an income, I would be a miserable failure. The gun show classes here charge $50.00 per person and they do four classes per gun-show weekend with probably 100 people per class. The weapons firing is shooting 5 short .22 rounds into a sand filled barrel. All the students get is a piece of paper to qualify them for a ccw. For many folks, that is all they want; cheap and fast.

    I try to give my two students a quality experience and, after the formal part of the class, they shoot a variety of firearms and have time to work on shooting skills. It is damn fun to teach someone who has never fired a pistol, and in some cases are scared to death of them, and leave them shooting paper reasonably well. We shoot until everyone is tuckered out, usually about 2.5 hours.

    Where I am, there is no requirement for licensing the facility; what I do on my rural property is my own damn business. I do carry liability insurance and the students sign a wavier. With only two folks and only one handling a gun at the time, I maintain comfortable control.

    Taxes are not a problem, because I have not shown a profit yet and somehow I suspect I never will. If I buy a $500.00 pistol, for the class of course, it is a business expense, as is all of the ammo I shoot for the class and preparing for the class.......
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2014
  9. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    The recommended instr/student ratio is 1:4, according to the NRA. More than four, consider a sidekick, which means profit sharing. A common fee is about $350 for 16 hours. That means, alone you can make up to $1400 on a weekend, minus overhead, before taxes.

    P.S. It is up to you to teach say a class of five, but that increases the risk. Should anything happen, not even an injury, just a student complains that another student muzzle covered her while you were looking away. You get serious flak.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2014
  10. FernandoTheCommando

    FernandoTheCommando New Member

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    Who do you "get serious flack" from and who do they complain to? The nra? I'm new to this idea so forgive my lack of knowledge. Been thinking about it for a long time though.
     
  11. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    My initial Counselor was fired for unspecified deficiencies in his other class, so my Instructor class nearly cancelled, they brought in someone else on a short notice. (A great team BTW) The NRA actively seeks feedback from students. Because they allow you to put the NRA Logo on your business card, they try to maintain quality control, like you own a franchise.

    To clarify: You get to use their name, but only as "NRA Certified". You can't make it look like you "are" NRA or you work for them.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2014
  12. FernandoTheCommando

    FernandoTheCommando New Member

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    Gotcha. Makes sense and im actually glad they take it that seriously or you'd have the potential for a bunch of hacks giving out certificates.