The trick to removing cosmoline, is???

Discussion in 'Cleaning and Maintenance' started by Vee_Kay, Aug 25, 2012.

  1. Vee_Kay

    Vee_Kay New Member

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    Oooooooooops.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2012
  2. Vee_Kay

    Vee_Kay New Member

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    Sorry, oops!!
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2012

  3. whyme

    whyme New Member

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    Hot water and lots of it. Along with a big box of rags.
     
  4. NM-LEO

    NM-LEO New Member

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    Rags, a toothbrush, and good ol fashioned elbow grease.

    For the lazy, add brake cleaner, marvel mystery oil, WD-40, or ethanol ;)
     
  5. Centurian22

    Centurian22 New Member

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    Disassemble what you can and soak / slosh metal parts in mineral spirits, use old tooth brush to work mineral spirits into larger metal parts. Wipe with lots of rags, wd-40 for further removal, (its a little more 'gentle') and to protect metal that the mineral spirits stripped. Wd-40, some type of gentle citrus cleaner, and / or pledge for wood. Have heard but not tried wrapping in paper towels, putting in black garbage bag and setting out in the sun on a hot day for several hours. Be sure to clean the bore very thoroughly with patches, a cleaner like hoppe's and a brush.
     
  6. sniper762

    sniper762 New Member

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    dissassemble...............local high pressure car wash...................then well oil and reassemble
     
  7. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    There are dozens of methods- heat, oven cleaner, run thru dishwasher, mineral spirits, pressure washer, parts cleaner, brake cleaner etc ad nauseum.

    Dollar store carries an orange gel type hand cleaner called Goop. Disassemble, soft brush, Goop, scrub, rinse with hot water. Advantage is house does not smell like kerosene, quick, cheap, and you don't have to clean cosmoline out of the dishwasher.
     
  8. silverado113

    silverado113 New Member

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    I used soap and water and soaked it, worked well for me.
     
  9. SSGSF

    SSGSF New Member

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    I Use diesel to clean mine, because it cleans and lubricates at the same time.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2012
  10. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    Lather, rinse and repeat...
     
  11. gvw3

    gvw3 New Member

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    Brake clean. My son cleaned one up real fast with that.
     
  12. MarkAD

    MarkAD New Member

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    Mosin.net or 762x54R.net has huge amounts of accurate detailed information oh how to do this.
     
  13. crazyWayne

    crazyWayne New Member

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    Kerosene and/or later fluid works well
     
  14. crazyWayne

    crazyWayne New Member

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    AutoCorrect works well

    Lighter fluid
     
  15. billt

    billt New Member

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    I've found Kerosene to be the best. The main reason is Cosmoline is a petroleum based product. So based on that it will remove better with a petroleum based solvent. Back in the mid 90's I bought a new, unissued Enfield complete with bayonet, still mummy wrapped in the Cosmoline. I removed the bolt and magazine and placed them in a 2 pound coffee can filled with warm, clean Kerosene. It was Summer at the time and I was living in Lake Havasu City, Arizona and the outside temperature in the Sun was close to 120 F.

    While the bolt and magazine were soaking I pushed a cleaning rod through the barrel and Cosomoline came out like toothpaste squeezed from a tube. I then used conventional patches and bronze brushes with the warm Kerosene, washing down the entire gun. Afterward I blasted everything with compressed air, and the gun was spotless. I gave it a good oiling and off to the range I went. The gun performed flawlessly. I did the same with 2 Mausers I bought from Mitchell's a time later. They weren't as bad, but the bolts on both rifles were heavily smeared with Cosmoline. After the warm Kerosene and air blast treatment, they were clean and good to go as well. There was zero need to disassemble them. The warm Kerosene dissolved the Cosmoline and it flowed out of all of the nooks and crannies.

    You can use WD-40 in place of Kerosene, but be sure to really blow it out of the internals of the weapon because it does leave a slightly gummy residue that Kerosene doesn't. It sure smells better however.
     
  16. billt

    billt New Member

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    I should emphasize the importance of warming up the Kerosene if you use this method. Cosmoline can be easily melted in a double boiler into a liquid. This is how it is applied to a lot of small parts. Cosmoline is warmed, and the small parts dipped into it. A small amount will adhere to the metal, and after it cools it forms that thick, tacky, waxy consistency Cosmoline is famous for.

    If you do one of these projects in the Winter, warming the Kerosene makes it work much better. Just don't try to heat it on the kitchen stove or your wife will kill you. It stinks up the house something awful. If you have an electric hot plate, they work well on a low or medium setting. Just place the metal coffee can, or whatever container you're using directly on it.
     
  17. chuckusaret

    chuckusaret Member

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    I remove the stock and take all the metal parts to a local plating company where they run the parts thru three cleaning tanks. All parts come out looking new.
     
  18. ineverFTF

    ineverFTF New Member

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    Where do you do that? How much does it cost?
     
  19. hogrider

    hogrider New Member

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    I haven't tried this but I wonder about WD40. That stuff works on a lot of things.
     
  20. chuckusaret

    chuckusaret Member

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    I have a neighbor that works at shop in North Palm Beach and I have no idea as to what the cost would be, to me it was free. :D