The Ruger 10/22 at 50!!

Discussion in '.22 Rifle/Rimfire Discussion' started by DrFootball, Aug 12, 2014.

  1. DrFootball

    DrFootball disappointed & disgusted, But DETERMINED... Lifetime Supporter

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    This year marks the 50th Annv. Of the 10/22. Ruger celebrates and commemorates the 10/22 with a 50th Annv. Model, available until 2/28/15, and all models produced until then with have the "50 years" roll mark... Thoughts?


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  2. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Are the anniversary Blackhawks with the XR3 frame worth any more than a regular blackhawk? Most of the anniversary blachhawks have been modified with a birdshead stock. The same thing will happen to the anniversary 10/22's. Only a few with special serial numbers will be worth big money. The rest will be shot to death or made tacti-cool.
     

  3. DrFootball

    DrFootball disappointed & disgusted, But DETERMINED... Lifetime Supporter

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    Not sure which one I will get before the end of the year. I like the interchangeable stocks from the Am. Rimfire, that went on the Contest winner model, but I'd rather get the takedown model. I already have a 20 y.o. 10/22 with a Tapco stock.....


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  4. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I like the Henry AR7 take down. I would truly use the Henry as a take down. The Henry is priced right at around $225. The Ruger is compact when broke down. The Henry breaks down to be stowed in the waterproof stock. The Henry only weighs 2.5 lb.

    I have a stainless steel 10/22 that is my favorite gun. The 10/22 needs very little maintenance. The only gun I own that can compare is my G19. I can tell you right now the Glock will not keep up the 10/22 when it comes to trouble free rounds fired without cleaning. The Glock doesn't need a lot of care. It does need to have the trash brushed off the feed ramp every couple hundred rounds to be trouble free. I could fix this issue by polishing the feed ramp but polishing would take the rust resistant coating off the feed ramp. I can easily shoot 1,000 rounds through the 10/22 without any care. More than once my niece has shot well over 1,000 rounds through the 10/22 in a week without cleaning the rifle. I just give the rifle a light coating of Safariland CLP when I clean it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2014
  5. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    it depends. on how many of them they make with the "50th" rollmark. usually to have some future value, there needs to be only a certain amount made. then if that particular gun were left in it's box and left unfired for a good number of years, it's possible it could have collectors value in the future.

    but if all of them are getting the same rollmark up until a certain date, IMO, no so much future value. it will be a little more special than the year before and after, but i doubt it will increase it's future value over them by much.
     
  6. DrFootball

    DrFootball disappointed & disgusted, But DETERMINED... Lifetime Supporter

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    Well,..the entire line gets the "50 years" roll mark from 2/1/14 to 2/28/15, but only one model is the "contest winner" edition. It's also the most expensive 10/22 outside of a custom job. Mine has a heavy .920 bull barrel from JARD, but I "tacticooled" it out with the Tapco stock long before that was common. The Mz. Loves it, but like every woman she wants "her own", and she'd really rather have a bolt gun( like the American Rimfire compact) or the Henry lever action. I also like the NRA/Davidsons take down version. Either way, the next one gets the "full treatment" including a good optic. I've also decided to get the byods stock Axxe,...and a traditional scope for the Mossberg,. So now I have two TruGlo 2x42 Prismatics. One is going on my 20 Ga. Mossberg semi-auto. But they aren't strong enough at only 2X fixed to put on any rifle except a 22.....


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  7. JCS53

    JCS53 That looks like it hurt Lifetime Supporter

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    I have a USA Shooting team Model...Most fun in a gun you can buy!!! BUY IT!!!..I paid 40 bucks more for mine that they Contributed to the Team. Money well spent.My 3 and 7 year old Granddaughters wear out 3-4 hundred rounds threw it every time they go with me and then they LET me shoot it...:eek:

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  8. limbkiller

    limbkiller New Member

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    What the hell did anything you just say have to do with what the OP said. Again I ask what planet do you live on?
     
  9. DrFootball

    DrFootball disappointed & disgusted, But DETERMINED... Lifetime Supporter

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    John, I had a older AR7 years ago. The Henry's work much better, but don't accept extended mags. I had a friend in my reserve unit that was a metal worker in civilian life. He had made two 8 rounders into 12 rounders for me with a new base plate/ lower housing and replaced springs. KFox tells me the 15's and 20's don't work in the new guns from Henry. Limbkiller: I think John Deer was describing the Henry over the 10/22 take down for it's size,...which is a viable comment. Then again, if I needed a real "Take down" gun for emergencies, the TNW Areo with 2 calibers( 9MM & .22LR) would fit in the same size bag ( just about) as the 10/22 takedown,,,and comes with a bag and a ballistic plate....


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  10. Hookeye

    Hookeye Active Member

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    I have a 47 yr old model.........

    [​IMG]
     
  11. DrFootball

    DrFootball disappointed & disgusted, But DETERMINED... Lifetime Supporter

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    SWEET!! I was 4 when it first came out. I shot my first one( my Cousin's) in 1968,...so his was from around the same time as yours...
     
  12. trigger643

    trigger643 New Member

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    To what the OP queried:

    In my experience limited editions, special editions, anniversary additions have a place in the collector market, albeit a very small niche with limited appeal. Only time will tell if there will be any additional value to a 50th anniversary edition -- and my guess it will be another 50 years before anyone notices.

    To this point we can look at many examples of limited edition and anniversary edition models that have come before and the negligible premium they have retained. For examples: The rash of Winchester 94's from the 1960's, both anniversary and limited edition. Once, fired, once the box and paper work are lost they are just another 30-30 on the rack. Unfired, in their original box with shipping sleeve and all paperwork intact they fetch hardly more of a premium than what they brought new when compared to standard production of the same vintage and condition. Likewise the 50 year anniversary of WWI Colt 1911's, the commemorative WWII Colts, the Franklin Mint Peace Makers. The 25th Anniversary Corvettes and the 100th Anniversary Harley Davidsons (and 50th Anniversary edition Harley's as well), have all fared poorly as investments on any measurable scale.

    From a Time Value of Money standpoint and as a general rule; these types of collectability points are terrible investments and from a historical perspective the only ones that profit on these items are the original issuers.

    That's okay, though. Buy what you like for the mere fact you like it.

    My ex mother in law knows for certain the Beany Babies Crash of 1999 was an anomaly and long term her investment is reliable and will be worth millions to my ex wife. Good for her.

    And best of luck to anyone that will be socking away 20 or 30 of the 50th anniversary 10/22s. I can honestly say this is a wiser purchase than playing the Lotto.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2014
  13. CrazedJava

    CrazedJava New Member

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    I don't buy guns to speculate, I buy guns to shoot 'em. I take good care of my guns so that maybe they will be 50 years old and I hope someone is still shooting them then.

    I think a 50th Anniversary Edition is a neat idea. The thought of some people buying those and stuffing them in a safe makes me cringe. The 10/22 is still the best semiauto .22 rifle I've ever fired. Maybe if someone stuffed a competition rifle in my hands I'd change my opinion, but you'd also just be handing me a tool I don't have the expertise to get the most out of it.

    If you're a big 10/22 fan and have the extra cash, go buy a 50th Anniversary Edition and then let people ogle it at the range. I'm not that big a fan myself, but if I had the extra funds I'd be tempted to do just that. Then I'd keep that rifle for myself and pass down my current 10/22 to one of my sons when they move out of the house.
     
  14. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    It's pretty plain and simple as with all commemorative firearms the ones that will be worth money will be snatched up at the distributor level. The chances of any of us walking into a gun shop and buying a truly collectable gun are somewhere between slim and none. Ruger will sell a bunch of 10/22 rifles with the 50th anniversary roll mark. I am not going to even guess how many rifles Ruger will sell.
     
  15. Hookeye

    Hookeye Active Member

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    I have seen collectible guns at steal prices several times.
    Usually it's an odd variant that nobody knows about, or is misidentified.

    Also seen "know it all" types think they are making a super score and it turns out to be an as priced non collectible.

    And of course, I've seen crooked mofos at gunshows try to pass off regular stuff as collectible.

    As always, buyer beware.
     
  16. Hookeye

    Hookeye Active Member

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    Too many think "commemorative" means "collectible".
    Usually it's the opposite.
    Odd versions and or those of very limited manufacture are what to look for.
    Pimped rigs tend to keep purist wallets closed.
     
  17. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    with the rare exception, i agree. if they produce a million rifles with the same "commemorative" rollmark, it really doesn't make it any more valuable or collectable.
     
  18. DrFootball

    DrFootball disappointed & disgusted, But DETERMINED... Lifetime Supporter

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    Axxe and Hook: this is true except for a few Very Rare Guns. I made a fair coin on the 75th Annv. Colt 1911( boxed limited edition in 1986) . I also am in the process of selling a 100th Annv. Colt SAA(1973). Both these guns were numbered lots. I think they were both either 500 or one was a 1,000 run. Many of them were obtained by employees at those times,..


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  19. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    when it comes to "commemoratives" there are going to be exceptions to the rule for sure. but usually it's going to be about the actual number of them manufactered for sale that will many times decide their value in the future.
     
  20. chloeshooter

    chloeshooter New Member

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    I don't think 10/22 and 'collectors edition' belong in the same sentence. Plinker and squirrel killer, yes.......