The Geneva convention, what is it?

Discussion in 'History' started by beastmode986, Oct 25, 2012.

  1. beastmode986

    beastmode986 New Member

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    Can someone please tell me what the Geneva convention is? I have heard people refer to it before but I don't quite understand it. Thanks!
     

  2. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    Basically, it defined how wars should be fought.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2012
  3. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    fixed it.

    Some conflicts do not fall under the Convention guidelines.
     
  4. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    I thought this was a joke or something, then I realized the OP is still a youngin'

    Don't they teach this stuff in school anymore? :confused:

    It's only one of the worst treaties for the modern era. That sh*t (the initial 3 articles) needed to be nullified after the end of hostilities in WWII, not made more prim and proper and adapted. :mad:

    How many rulers in the conquering days had "rules" for war?

    I just don't remember having the chance to read Alexander the Great's "On Battle Etiquette" or Genghis Khan's "On Prisoner Treatment". :rolleyes:

    How many of our troops would have come home if we weren't trying to fight "clean"??

    JD
     
  5. beastmode986

    beastmode986 New Member

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    Thanks guys, in the past though I heard there were rules though like you can't use any privately owned/civilian owned firearms, you cant shoot someone with a hollow point, you can't use civilian scopes etc???
     
  6. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    You are talking about the specific rules of engagement/combat, is that what you want to see? The list of what is, and what is not?
     
  7. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Yeah, that is what I thought and had to go double check myself, because I was honestly unclear of the timing.

    Okay Genenva mostly deals with how you treat other soldiers during combat (not shooting medics for example), how they are treated when captured, how you treat civilians when you take over their town, what is allowed to do to get information, what is not allowed to do to get information, etc.

    You are talking about the St. Petersburg Declaration of 1868, which later became absorbed into the Hague Convention of 1899 and later 1907

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Petersburg_Declaration_of_1868

    This is where you can read about use of hollow point bullets and the use of large caliber 12.7mm / .50 cal in use against anti-material targets (humans) and things like poison gas and horrible things people came up with to kill each other.

    They are thought to have been rolled into the Geneva Convention, but that is not the case, though I believe the same world court that would hear a case about one, would hear a case about the other. Though I am admittedly no expert on the matter.

    JD
     
  8. beastmode986

    beastmode986 New Member

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    Read through it but can't find anything on hollow points or 50's. Clicked s few link and didn't see it ?
     
  9. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    You're killing me smalls. :rolleyes: You had better get an "A" on this paper I am helping you with.

    You have read it as it was written:

    That means the use of exploding, hollow point, Black Talon like ammunition in small arms.

    Heavy weapons are no longer "small arms" and thus the introduction of Anti-Material rifles, which coincides with the metric equivalent of a .50 caliber round (12.7mm)
     
  10. beastmode986

    beastmode986 New Member

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    Ok thanks a lot, but what about using civilian weapons and scopes? Where does it talk about those or what does?
     
  11. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    It doesn't. At least not to my knowledge. This was written at a time when warfare pretty much involved anything you could get your hands on, so there was no "civilian" market as opposed to "a military market" when it came to hardware.

    There was a ratification of Geneva in like 2005, but I haven't read it. Maybe it was added there, but I highly doubt it.

    Basically wars were being fought and some scientists got together and came up with really ugly ways to kill each other. The great powers, Russia, Most of the countries in Europe, Italy, Spain, etc. wanted to head off a huge arms race at the time, so they all got together and said "we need to find a humane way to kill each other" and everybody signed on the dotted line.
     
  12. Sonic82

    Sonic82 New Member

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    In time of war, you can use Daisy Cutters but no Hollow Points.
     
  13. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    AFAIK, none of the amunuition restrictions apply to insurgents. The "Rules of War" apply to uniformed combatants.
     
  14. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    You Sir, *said with heavy respect*, are 100% correct.

    The Rules of War are only actually applicable when nations that signed the Treaty/Agreement go to war.

    It does not apply to pretty much anyone in the middle east.
     
  15. beastmode986

    beastmode986 New Member

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    Wait so someone in the military can use a civilian weapon instead of there issued one? And put any scope on there service issued weapon???
     
  16. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Now you are blurring lines.

    What soldiers can use for their gear is dictated by the military/command under which they serve.

    That has nothing to do with either the Geneva Convention or St. Petersburg Declaration.
     
  17. dog2000tj

    dog2000tj New Member

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    Useless :cool: ... and puts our fighting men and women in harms way :mad: