The Cold War stuff.

Discussion in 'History' started by Rex in OTZ, Dec 12, 2016.

  1. W.T. Sherman

    W.T. Sherman Well-Known Member

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    silos are always manned by Armed airmen, maintenance men wouldn't be armed.

    there was serious accident that happen in Arkansas 40 years ago, when a maintenance man dropped a socket from near the top of a TITAN II, went through the grate, hit the floor and bounced up and put a hole in the side of the missile, which caused thousand of pounds of rocket fuel to leak out, the result...………...BOOM!!!!!

    luckily the warhead didn't explore, otherwise that part of Arkansas would be vaporized with thousands kill and hundreds of miles from the site would be inhabitable for decades and decade and decades.

    here is a short clip about that, PBS AMERCIAN EXPERIENCE did a great documentary about it, title COMMAND AND CONTROL, worth watching




     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2020
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  2. ellis36

    ellis36 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hey, Sherman!

    Here's an Opinion piece just for you. :)

    ellis

    https://www.americanthinker.com/blo..._william_t_sherman_on_his_200th_birthday.html

    FTA:"...
    Sherman's a character who deserves some intensive study, given his intriguing human dimensions and because he's so different from the kind of people we see today. But he's not. He's too complicated for an age of wokeness and identity politics. Yet the very truth of his intense existence exposes the left for all its jejeune ideas. America, though, is poorer for not remembering...."
     
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  3. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    Da what?

    Let’s talk when you’re sober :D
     
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  4. alsaqr

    alsaqr Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In the mid 1960s i was stationed at Fort MacArthur, CA. Our EOD unit provided emergency support to Nike Hercules sites in the Los Angeles area. Some missiles at those sites carried conventional high explosive warheads, other nuclear warheads.

    The Nike Hercules carried the W-31 nuclear warhead. Yields of the W-31 warheads were 2,10, 20 and 30 kilotons. The Nike Hercules could carry one of three different yields. Yep, a 20 kiloton blast over LA would have shaken things up.

    It was easy to extinguish nuclear armed missiles from conventional. The nuclear armed missiles had a two foot long baro probe.

    While stationed in Korea in 1963 my unit responded to the accidental firing of a conventional Nike Hercules missile. Lightning struck the missile igniting one of the four booster motors. The missile landed on a sandbar in the river, stuck there like a huge dart.

    The Titan missile carried the W-53 warhead, nine megatons.
     
  5. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Good Lord that had to be a sight to see. So scary and almost funny at the same time.
     
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  6. W.T. Sherman

    W.T. Sherman Well-Known Member

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    man, if I saw a missile go off the launcher by itself, my skives wouldn't be dry or clean...………...I bet everyone's else who saw that their under ware wouldn't be dry or clean either:D

    also in 1983, when I was in Germany they fielded the PERSING II , mobile launched ground to ground nuclear missiles. the Germans heavily protesting their deployment. staging protest outside the PERSHING unit barracks where the unit couldn't even leave on a field exercise, and were basically were confined to the post. as well as protesting in most of the cities. I walked up on one in the market square when I went to Nuremberg, made a quick rear-march and left :D

    they were some exciting times back then, protests, ABLE ARCHER, and a attack by terrorist firing a RPG at USAREUR Commander Gen.Kroesen :D.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2020
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  7. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    And then they didn’t mind when the wall came down. Now there’s more room to protest American barbarism.
     
  8. alsaqr

    alsaqr Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The predecessor to the Nike Hercules was the Nike Ajax, a slim conventional missile. Some former Nike Ajax launch sites were modified to accommodate the Nike Hercules. There was very little room to work in those pits.

    Early on folks discovered there were nuclear armed missiles in/near their cities. Some were concerned, others paralyzed with fear. In order to assure folks that the nuclear armed missiles were safe; the military built a Nike Hercules site in the desert and blew the thing up, filming all the while. Well, there was a significant nuclear contribution. As a result the US Army classified the movie.

    Periodically the US Army, civilian law enforcement and fire fighters participated in an emergency drill called a NAICP (Nuclear Accident/Incident Control Plan. The Fort Macarthur staff lead the exercise and our EOD unit participated. The LA fire chief was never comfortable with the concept of fighting fires involving nuclear armed missiles. At one exercise he flatly told the "beloved " major of our EOD headquarters detachment his fire fighters would not fight those fires.

    Yep, the Pershing II missiles in Germany scared the little red panties off the Russians. Ditto for the GLCMs.
     
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  9. bluez

    bluez Well-Known Member

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    The left now hates the russians because they are no longer Communists.
    They dared to free themselves from that "wonderful" system , making leftists everywhere look foolish for clinging to this failed ideology.

    And now they even dare to teach russian children family values! Girls are raised wanting to be women! And no LGBT propaganda allowed in schools either! How terrible!
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2020
  10. bluez

    bluez Well-Known Member

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    We had France help us out before against a tyranny.. If/when the left owns all houses of Gov't and commits the predictable atrocities we should take help from any quarter against the lethal threat the american left is..
    Even the FBI now parrots the lefts disingenuous talking points intended to divert Americans from the real threat (the left)
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2020
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  11. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    And no late term abortion.

    But no free elections either; a police state; propping up Cuba and Venezuela and Iran; and hacking our institutions second only to China. It’s complicated. What is clear by now is that not every enemy of Hillary is necessarily a friend. Unfortunately. It is probably true that the socialist left feel betrayed by the Russians.
     
  12. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    These Helicopter Scouts Saw Combat Up Close.

    07b_sep2017_loachhunterkillers_live.jpg origin.jpg

    Queer John was famous not just for crashing,

    The 'Loach' was one of the riskiest helicopter assignments in Vietnam

    While barely any American helicopters served in World War II and few flew in Korea, Vietnam was a proving ground for many airframes — everything from the venerable Huey to Chinooks sporting huge guns.

    One of the most dangerous helicopter assignments was a tiny scout helicopter known as the "Loach." Officially designated the OH-6 Cayuse, these things were made of thin plexiglass and metal but were expected to fly low over the jungles and grass, looking for enemy forces hiding in the foliage.


    In the hunter-killer teams, the Loach would fly low over the jungle, drawing fire and then calling for the Cobra to kill the teams on the ground.

    In air mobile teams, a pilot would fly low while an observer would scan the ground for signs of the enemy force. Some of them were able to tell how large a force was and how recently it had passed. They would then call in scouts on the ground or infantrymen to hunt for the enemy in the brush while attack helicopters protected everyone

    When the Loach debuted in 1966, it broke records for speed, endurance, and rate of climb, all important attributes for a scout helicopter. It was powered by a 285-hp engine but the helicopter weighed less than a Volkswagen.

    They were usually joined by Cobra gunships — either in hunter-killer teams where the Loach hunted and the Cobra killed or in air mobile cavalry units where both airframes supported cavalry and infantrymen on the ground.

    The Loach also had its own gunner in the rear and could carry everything from 7.62mm miniguns to 70mm rockets and anti-tank missiles. But even that armament combined with the Cobra escort couldn't keep them safe. They were famous for being shot down or crashing in combat. One, nicknamed "Queer John," hit the dirt at least seven times.

    Queer John was famous not just for crashing, but for keeping the crew safe while it did so. An Army article written after John's seventh crash credited it with surviving 61 hits from enemy fire and seven crashes without losing a single crew member.

    20200327_151914.jpg

    While Loachs were vulnerable to enemy fire, they were famous for surviving crashes like John did. A saying among Army aviators was, "If you have to crash, do it in a Loach."

    The OH-6 was largely removed from active U.S. Army service in favor of the Kiowa, but modified versions of the helicopter flew with the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment as the MH-6C Little Bird as late as 2008.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sou...AxAB&usg=AOvVaw0dPGhdnnWXrk8cRQwnBK5T&ampcf=1

    https://books.google.com/books?id=6...obUAhVITSYKHemOAlwQ6AEIPDAG#v=onepage&q=queer john helicopter&f=false

    https://www.airspacemag.com/military-aviation/snakes-loaches-180964341/
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2020
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  13. W.T. Sherman

    W.T. Sherman Well-Known Member

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    here's a somewhat funny story about OH-6. when I PCS'd to korea in 86 I was told by my unit that the north Koreans by "hook and crook" bought some MD500s (civilian version of the OH-6 cayuse) a year or so earlier, their plan for them, according to what I was told, was to fly into south Korea prior to a invasion at key strategic points, like the presidential palace and drop off NK SF and reek a bit of havoc and to use them to attack friendlies ,meaning us and the ROK army

    now, the ROK Army at the time had OH-6s, needless to say they stopped flying them and mothballed them, because we were told if the balloon every went up, that regardless what was painted on them we were to engage and destroy any OH-6s flying
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2020
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  14. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    The South Korean government, under the administration of Park Chung-hee, took an active role in the Vietnam War. From September 1964 to March 1973, South Korea sent more than 300,000 troops to South Vietnam.

    The South Korean Army, Marine Corps, Navy, and Air Force all participated as an ally of the United States. The number of troops from South Korea was much greater than those from Australia and New Zealand, and second only to the U.S. military force for foreign troops located in South Vietnam. The military commander was Lieutenant General Chae Myung-shin of the South Korean army.


    Operations involving South Korea
    Battle of Bong Son
    Battle of Trà Bình
    Battle of Đức Cơ
    Operation Hong Kil Dong

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Korea_in_the_Vietnam_War
     
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  15. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    The Kingdom of Thailand, under the administration of military dictator Field Marshal Thanom Kittikachorn, took an active role in the Vietnam War. Thailand was the third-largest provider of ground forces to South Vietnam, following the Americans and South Koreans.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thailand_in_the_Vietnam_War
     
  16. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    Good to know. Looking back maybe they didn’t do enough, should have been their war to begin with.
    I don’t think they can be trusted. Very self oriented. Protected by us and yet they have a whole government Ministry of Reconciliation. Reaching out to NK all the time against our objections. JMO.
     
  17. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Rmemeber this is the mid 1960's of the 20th century.
    Applying 2020 geo politics to the same nation in reguards to 1960's military actions is not the same thing.
     
  18. Nod

    Nod Well-Known Member

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    Speaking of the 'cold war' this was taken at Grafenwohr, Germany in around Sept or Oct 1961 just after the Berlin wall went up and they sent us out to the field. I wanted to post this when I last saw this thread but couldn't find the photo. This is me sitting on a Honest John rocket. We had a bunch of them hidden under these sheds. Never got to see one fired. Seems like a lifetime ago.

    [​IMG]
     
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  19. W.T. Sherman

    W.T. Sherman Well-Known Member

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    that is neat! good thing you didn't see one fire...…...because that would mean tha columns of Soviets tanks and the rest of the WARSAW PACT were streaming over the border through the FULDA GAP.

    that also brings back memories from the 70s when my unit, which was under DIVARTY, had to pull guard duty on a NATO "HARD" SITE near Furth Army Airfield, NATO SITE 23. that's where they kept nuclear artillery shells for the 8inch M110, that guard duty wasn't something you didn't wanted to screw around in, it was serious $hit, commanders SOGs and guards got relived and busted in a heart beat. we were "loaded for bear" full combat load, bandoleer of 180 rounds grenades, flak vest etc..

    I think by that time, 75, the HONEST JOHN was pulled from the active Army inventory and replaced with the LANCE, or maybe not
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2020
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  20. W.T. Sherman

    W.T. Sherman Well-Known Member

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    oh and speaking of nuclear missile/artillery, the most stupidest thing I've seen (in a museum) was a field tactical nuclear weapon called the DAVY CROCKETT. not only did it kill the enemy but with a range just a couple miles, the crew got a huge dose of radiation and would have died a horrible death a few days later. they actual fielded that to units in Germany in the late 50s
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2020
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