The ‘War on Work’.

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by Vincine, Oct 3, 2011.

  1. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    As deep as the well of America ingenuity is, it doesn’t make up for the lack of respect physical work gets in this country, at least by the popular media.

    One of the things that has always distressed me is the poor state of the vocational & skilled trade education & apprentice system is in our country. As if all kids should/could aspire to be software engineers, MBAs, lawyers, or whatever. As if anyone who works with their hands is somehow lesser. As if anyone who works with their hands doesn’t also use their minds. The Germans do the vocational thing right and, big surprise, they’re a country that, unlike us, actually makes and exports stuff.

    This video of a TED Talk by Mike Rowe express my view interestingly. He also talks a lot about balls. It’s 20 minutes, watch it when you have some time.

    Mike Rowe celebrates dirty jobs | Video on TED.com
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2011
  2. Ploofy

    Ploofy New Member

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    You get a thumbs up.
     

  3. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    PART of the problem- we have let our public education system be run by the "intelligentsia"- people that are incapable of changing a lightbulb. As a result, we have scads of unemployed youngsters that have recd training for nothing beyond watching TV, and nursing at the public teat- while you cannot FIND a skilled mechanic, plumber, electrician, heavy equipment operator.

    I have one customer that is a cross country pipeliner. These folks lay about 5 miles of transmission pipe a day. Welded steel. They were paying welders in Northern CA $45 an hour. It IS very physically demanding work. BTW, they were working six 10 hr shifts a week- so that 20 hrs of time-and-a-half a week- How many Art History majors do you know making $3150 a week?

    There was a program in Denver run by a lady that was a retired electrician- I was a volunteer instructor. The students are young welfare mothers that wanted to get off welfare- but had no job skills. Intensive 26 week program, easy to bust out- but on graduation, you are a trained, skilled construction laborer with a GED. We had about 45 students at a time. 2 years after graduation, average 95% still employed. Program was run with NO government money.
     
  4. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Glad you have a high opinion of cross country pipeliners! That's the job I got hurt on, went into a local construction company after recovering from the surgery. The most recent one I worked on was the Transcontinental Pipeline Project, my line went from east TX to AL.
     
  5. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    There are times I wonder if we have too much education.

    i.e. When a college grad needs a degree to work construction labor.
     
  6. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    Like my daddy used to call it...."educated idiots"

    built my first small block GM engine at 15...ASE certified in engines and transmissions at 19. now a journeyman tinner, metal fabricator...my kids dont know the difference between a ball peen and torx bit.:confused: or did i just fail at the only vocation i ever really took seriously....Dad:confused:
     
  7. freefall

    freefall New Member

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    I'm a plumber. Started college intending to be a lawyer. Then I watched what lawyers really do. Decided I couldn't lie for money, I'd rather be able to sleep at night.
    ps. must say, I'm amazed at how few people can do absolutely NOTHING.
     
  8. REDMIST89

    REDMIST89 New Member

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    i started college for graphic design but didnt finish as i found i hated that college but i want/wanted that cushy desk job making stuff on 3D rendering programs and auto-cad..i love that kinda work but ive also been taught by my dad alot about automotive,electrical,woodworking,..so im kinda both worlds,but i know that in today's "over educated" world the guy who fixes your car or repairs your pipes your house or does the stuff that makes the world the college techy people work in even possible get no love..its a shame really.
     
  9. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    I have deep respect and gratitude for the skilled workers who I hire to help me keep my house in shape. I have no such skills and I don't know where I'd be without these people. This is a place for everybody and we all do what we do best. No one job is more important than the other. Whether it's trash pickup, open heart surgery, plumbing, carpentry, architect, etc.
     
  10. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    Well spoken! Something i have always found true. i NEVER look down my nose at what another person does for an HONEST living. Even that guy flipping the burgers at Burger King is performing a needed task.
     
  11. BenLuby

    BenLuby New Member

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    Both of you have it exactly right. I have more respect for the Spatula Commando than I do the professional college student who spends life going to school.
    The blue collar is the backbone of the country. We just seem to have forgotten our spine.
    Anyone that puts in an honest days work for a days pay I have the utmost respect for. And that includes, especially in this economy, those that are actively seeking a job to get back at it.
     
  12. Gordo323

    Gordo323 New Member

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    Great post!
    The video was well worth watching!
     
  13. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    Anybody else actually watch it? Gordo's the only one to admit it.

    I’m just now reminded of a joke:
    An art director gets a bill from a plumber for fixing his sink.
    The art director says, “I can’t afford this and I'M an ART DIRECTOR!"
    The plumber responds, “Yeah, when I was an art director, I couldn’t afford it either.”
    :D

    (Disclosure, I was a commercial artist in a previous life.)

    Except for the production of wealth for wealth’s sake, I. e. wealth that has by passed the exchange of value, a community needs the productive contributions of everybody, whatever their talents and abilities may be.

    I liked the way Rowe made the point about those who actually do, vs. those who think they can. I thought you guys would too.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2011
  14. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    It is a great video, Vinne..
    Ive grown up on a ranch and dont consider most of what he mentioned as "work", its just what you do (we have larger livestock, and we dont use rubber bands, but I never seen them "bitten off":p)

    Its all about finding your "niche".. My favorite job ive had was being a sawsmith.. Pay wasnt great, but decent. But I loved the job and had a great boss. I wish I could work there again... I learned many great skills and that I love working with metal. Im always welding something around the ol' ranch, be it a broken horse corral or fabbing up a bracket for my scout....
     
  15. steve666

    steve666 New Member

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    I have nothing against hard work... I can sit and watch it all day!!!
     
  16. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    I've never done anything but physical labor, excepting the time I spent with the Military Police and then as a civilian security officer.

    Infantry is most definitely labor work, just of a different type.

    I've done Concrete and Construction (residential and commercial), Pipeline, Steel Mill (making Pipeline fittings and flanges) furniture assembly and delivery, portajohn pumping (my favorite), automotive (tires and oil, and helping the REAL mechanics), and chicken processing.

    I'm currently in school, majoring in Forestry, hoping to find work as a conservation officer/ game warden
     
  17. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    When I was in high school, I worked as a housekeeper at the local hospital. People would be incredibly rude to me. Many of those people were the 'educated' people working at the hospital. I remember emptying a garbage can in the lab and the tech nonchalantly dropped a tissue on the floor right next to the garbage can as I was still standing there. I stood there for a moment trying to figure out this rudeness. Funny thing is, from what I observed in the lab, it inspired me to go to college and become a Med Tech. I've always loved science. The thing that rude tech didn't know was not only did I empty her garbage cans but I knew how to mix the chemicals to disinfect the floors and the rooms that had contagious patients in. I had to clean so many rooms in the course of my 8 hour day. I also had to hurry and clean the rooms of a discharged patient so a new patient could be put into that room, which included wiping down the total bed frame, windowsills, etc. Part of my job was as I went into each patient's room, I was to check to be sure the patient's side rails were up so there would be no falls. I really wasn't just a stupid garbage pick up person. Even the guy flipping those burgers has to be aware of hygiene, temp of the food, etc. Jobs aren't always what they appear to the person who doesn't know that job.

    One of my current co-workers once said, "Why is the housekeeper so stressed. All she has to do is empty garbage cans." I assured her that was not the case.
     
  18. bkt

    bkt New Member

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    Wonderful video! Mike Rowe is extremely intelligent and always a pleasure to hear speak. Thanks for the link.
     
  19. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I am also a plumber. You are right, the law is a much dirtier profession. I can wash my hands and be good to go..................

    The problem with vocational/apprenticeship programs, is that they only seem to attract those who did not care enough about education to finish high school. These folks are shocked when one of he first things they have to study is math.

    I taught an plumbing apprenticeship program for one year, it was tougher than digging ditches.