Teach me about sharpening

Discussion in 'Other Weapons' started by Yunus, Sep 22, 2013.

  1. Yunus

    Yunus New Member

    5,250
    0
    0
    So I just broke down and bought my first quality chef's knife and HOLY COW is it better than anything I have used before. I used to not grasp or understand what the tv chefs were talking about when they would speak about cutting vegetables and say things like "keep your knife sharp so it doesn't slip", I was so in the dark that I had no clue what not slipping meant... now I do and I don't want to ever go back.

    All that said, my awesome knife won't stay this sharp forever. So what do I need to keep it in tip top shape? Should I buy a whet stone kit? If so which one? Is the Steel enough as long as I take it to be professionally sharpened annually?

    I kind of want to sharpen it myself because I'd rather DIY than pay someone eve n if that is cheaper but at the same time if I can't DIY for less than $75 than I'd rather pay a pro.
     
  2. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

    7,236
    0
    0

  3. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

    6,489
    0
    0
  4. magnumman

    magnumman New Member

    544
    0
    0
    I use the same smith tri-hone stones that I use for all of my knives. I only have one "professional" kitchen knife, the rest are nice but fairly inexpensive blades. I can get them all razor sharp with not a whole lot of work. The most important thing about sharpening is technique. There are a few guys on YouTube who have great videos on using different sharpening systems.
     
  5. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    2,000
    0
    0
    Yunus, when dealing with quality cooking blades, what most of us think of as "dull" is really the edge of the blade rolling over or "curling" with regular use. The steel that comes with most quality knife sets is used often to roll the sharp edge back into straight alignment with the rest of the blade. Stones, diamond sharpeners and wheels grind steel off of the blade and make the knife wear out much sooner than it should. Unless the knife gets dented or chipped, the steel should be used often to keep the sharp edge straight and extend the life of your quality blade. :)

    [ame]http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=peOy_9TFyC0[/ame]
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2013
  6. KG7IL

    KG7IL Well-Known Member

    3,155
    37
    48
    +10 on the Lansky sharpener.

    I have used this one on several knives and like the way that you can really watch and control the edge.

    The unit can be set up to match any angle by locating the clamp properly.

    The unit also includes coarse, medium, fine, etc for the right amount of material removal.

    the system has quite a few accessory stones.
     
  7. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

    1,638
    0
    0
  8. Yunus

    Yunus New Member

    5,250
    0
    0
    Awesome, thanks everyone for the info. I have some reading and practice to do.

    I know I won't need the sharpening kit for at least 6 months, the steel will work until then. Also the local kinfe shop will sharpen it for $4 so that's pretty hard to beat if I only need to worry about 1 knife.
     
  9. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

    5,421
    720
    113
    I found a great book on sharpening. Sharpening made Easy. The author discusses the science of making a fine edge without the use of gimmic sharpeners.
     
  10. KG7IL

    KG7IL Well-Known Member

    3,155
    37
    48
    I would be careful using a Work-Sharp electric sharpener on a quality knife. A little to much, a little to fast.

    Work Sharp does make great tools tho. I have their 3000 and it's great for plane blades and chisels.

    [​IMG]

    I notice it has more attachments than the last time I looked.

    http://www.worksharptools.com/woodworking/woodworking-sharpener.html
     
  11. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    2,000
    0
    0
    Many people get tools like this trying to make sharpening fast and easy, but sharpening is one of the things in life that should be done slow and steady! Too much speed creates heat, and heat can destroy the temper of the steal, ruining hardness of the blade. Grinders are fine for cheap knives or those you no longer care about, but for expensive, finely-worked knives they are death.

    Congrats on your decision, Yunus! It's exactly what I do - use a steel almost daily when cooking and then give it to a professional when the steel doesn't work anymore.
     
  12. AgentTikki

    AgentTikki New Member

    3,496
    0
    0
    Use a steel and use it often. Steels are magnetic and do not actually remove material from your blade. What they do is realign the micro serrations on the edge. After a little practice, you can feel the correct angle on your edge when using a steel. I am and ex chef and can tell you a steel is your best friend, and I'll use it every day.

    If you want the proper edge geometry, take it to a professional. You cannot duplicate they edge they can grind with the equipment they have at home. They will take off material to make the edge so you don't want to do this often. Even when working in a kitchen, I only had my knives sharpened once every couple of years. At home once every 4-5 years depending on need.

    Also all pros aren't the same...you really need to find a good one. I've seen some real hack jobs. So ask around for referrals.
     
  13. Bob124

    Bob124 New Member

    9
    0
    0
    i use this for my knives [​IMG]

    very easy to use and cheap, 18$ shipped on amazon
     
  14. Artbrownsr

    Artbrownsr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    3,028
    96
    48
    First I have not read the whole thread, I was just starting to and saw this post from Anna and she has the same system I have.
    I've got a neghbor that they both (Husb&Wife) are chefs at two different resteraunts, I corrected mistakes from "Pros" and since have been their personal sharpeners. All this using the Lansky stones and I also have used and still occasionally use a 50 year old bench stone.
    The main points on a quality sharpening is staying at the preferred angle (depends on use) stones are cleaned before and after use, ( no particles to make nicks or scratches), even strokes and same number of strokes on each side, FOLLOW THE CONTOUR ( if the blade is curved keep the curve, don't try to straiten it ), use appropriate lubricant ( plain water, mineral oil, cooking oil,) ( depends on the stones used the end use of the blade etc.
     
  15. Rentacop

    Rentacop Well-Known Member

    1,112
    48
    48
    The vid neglected to make clear that you should always finish up a sharpening job with a fine stone or other mild treatment .

    Results sharpening with stones and free hands vary with the skill of the person doing it .

    I've used a Chef's Choice power sharpener as well as the built-in power sharpener on an electric can opener . These devices are harsh and I would never use them on a fine knife .

    Some fine knives from Germany ( Wustuf ) and Japan come from the factory with a steeper angle of grind for more sharpness . I favor looking at the edge as it meets the stone to get the angle just right .
     
  16. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

    6,624
    2
    0
    I use a chefs steel or a large ceramic rod to keep my knives sharp. If I spend over $30 on a knife I expect it to be hollow ground. One shouldn't need to correct the edge, just keep it sharp.
     
  17. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    Be careful about paying someone else to sharpen your blades. Many times they use a leather wheel on a bench grinder. You should never, EVER, see sparks fly when sharpening a knife. This is acceptable on some large tools, but for me, still not desired. Grinders are for shaping metal; and in my opinion, taking the nicks out of chisels and a few other tools are where their duty ends.

    It should always be done by hand, slow and steady, with care and patience.
     
  18. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

    6,489
    0
    0
  19. Artbrownsr

    Artbrownsr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    3,028
    96
    48
    Well said trip.

    Sparks indicate heat, heat destroys temper, temper is the amount of hardness at the business edge of the knife. therefore SPARKS DESTROY THE HARDNESS OF THE EDGE!
     
  20. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    grinding is one of the worst ways to ever sharpen a blade. it creates way too much heat and will destroy a blade.

    i wouldn't even use a grinder to sharpen an axe or hatchet blade. i will use a file instead to remove any nicks or burrs, following up with a stone.

    i use a Smith diamond sharpener for my pocket knives and a steel and or a ceramic stone for my kitchen knives. it has a coarse and fine sides on it and only takes a few strokes to bring the edges back.

    one of these days, maybe i will locate my Lansky sharpener!