Target practice with a .357 snub nose and .380 semi-automatic

Discussion in 'Training & Safety' started by Handygirl103, Oct 26, 2012.

  1. Handygirl103

    Handygirl103 New Member

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    I typically just shoot for fun with rifles for target practice and shotguns for clay pigeons. It's been about 14 years since I've even shot a handgun. But since I recently inherited a .357 snub nose, and would like to get my concealed carry permit, I've been doing some target practice in my yard. The first time I went out I shot the .357 at 20 yards. I was using an 8" target and only hit it twice out of five rounds. I was very disappointed and realized it was gonna take me a while to get used to handguns again. The next day I borrowed a .380 semi-automatic from my mom, and using the same 8" targets at 20 yards I hit the target with all 14 rounds, but only within a 6" group. When I told my mom about my results, she said I should not be shooting from 20 yards. My question is this: How far should I be starting from (since I'm basically starting from scratch with handguns) now, and how far should I realistically be hoping to get to with practice?
     
  2. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    Welcome to FTF. The general accepted distance is 21'. Most circumstances where a handgun is required are within that distance (generally much closer). With practice you should be able to reach out to 25 yards with most handguns.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2012

  3. Handygirl103

    Handygirl103 New Member

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    Thanks! I guess I'll start at 7 yards tomorrow and take it from there.
     
  4. Gh0zt36

    Gh0zt36 Active Member

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    Yea , I was going to suggest 10 yards . That's pretty good . Also while .357 isn't the most powerful gun on the planet it is no slouch either. So if you're not shooting sub MOA at 20 yards don't let it discourage you . Especially if you havn't shot in a while.

    Also welcome to the forum. And we love pics around here so if ya feel like showing off your newly aquired .357 we'd love to see it !!!
     
  5. jimogden1984

    jimogden1984 New Member

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    Go get some 38 specials and shoot those to get you started. They'll be easier to handle than the 357
     
  6. Old_Crow

    Old_Crow New Member

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    When you have to qualify for your concealed permit you don't have to use a pocket pistol. You are free to use a duty sized pistol. Then as others have posted you only have to shoot 7 yards, a few courses in this area have you qualify at 10 yards. I used a Dan Wesson 357mag with 10" barrel to qualify.
     
  7. vincent

    vincent New Member

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    Welcome to the forum!!! :D

    Good advice here so far, SD distance (21' and in) is where to start, then as you get more comfortable, move out a bit...Plus, if you have a SD confrontation from more than 21', you gots some 'splainin to do...:eek: (see Tueller rule...)

    The snubby just isn't the best range gun, more for up close and personal encounters so don't get discouraged with your results, the .38 idea is a great one and will help you with trigger control and muscle memory...

    I would start off at a simple 3 yards, move back as your groups improve...
     
  8. 7point62

    7point62 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    X2 on all of the above.
     
  9. Handygirl103

    Handygirl103 New Member

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    Thanks for the advice!

    I knew the .357 wouldn't be good for target practice, but since it was a free gun, I'm gonna shoot it ;) It certainly won't be the gun I carry when I get my permit, but I do want to be comfortable with it in case I ever need to count on it. Which brings me to my next question... Suggestions for what to carry? My good friend is offering me his old duty gun, which is a .45, but I'm thinking that's a bit overkill for me. I was leaning towards a 9mm. Thoughts?
     
  10. vincent

    vincent New Member

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    Without knowing exactly how much experience with handguns you have, the best thing I could tell you is to see if you can find a range that rents guns, and try out as many as possible to see what you shoot best, what is in your price range and what fits your carry needs the best...

    If it's not comfortable for you to carry then you'll likely end up just not carrying it. Of course you ladies have the advantage of a handbag so there goes my 'comfort' angle...;)

    Long story short, find which model you shoot most consistently, then go from there...
     
  11. marc29th

    marc29th New Member

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    9mm is a find round with modern self-defense ammo and it probably gives you the greatest number of handguns to choose from. Look at all the well know arms makers S&W, Ruger, SIG Sauer, Colt, Springfield, Glock etc, etc and find the one that fits your hand the best. Only you'll know which one is best for you.
     
  12. SatoriNoir

    SatoriNoir New Member

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    I also recommend starting with 38 Specials as well, it makes the snubnose easier to train with when recoil is less of a factor. As you become more confident with your revolver, you can choose to transition to 38 Special +P's before tackling the magnum rounds.
     
  13. jimogden1984

    jimogden1984 New Member

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    And 38s are WAY cheaper
     
  14. Old_Crow

    Old_Crow New Member

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    It really depends on how you look at it. Yes, you can buy a 38 revolver for a lot less than a dependable 9mm semi-auto. But if you shoot a lot 9mm ammo can be had a lot cheaper. So in the end the 9mm ends up being cheaper, unless you want to spend half your range time reloading.
     
  15. SatoriNoir

    SatoriNoir New Member

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    Or be the odd one in the bunch and get a 9mm revolver ;)

    Charter Arms offers the Pitbull revolver chambered for the rimless 9mm cartridge, priced at $380 retail. It also does not require the use of moon clips, unlike the Taurus 905.

    Never shot one, but would love to see a range report of it if you actually decide on getting it.
     
  16. Gh0zt36

    Gh0zt36 Active Member

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    i have the .40 pitbull and its for sale ;)
     
  17. jimogden1984

    jimogden1984 New Member

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    I meant shoot 38s out of the 357 revolver she already has
     
  18. AIKIJUTSU

    AIKIJUTSU New Member

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    In South Carolina, to qualify for a concealed weapons permit the max distance in the shooting part is 45 feet, with other distances being 30, 21, 15, and 9 feet. But you only have to put 35 of 50 shots into a target the size of a man's chest. So really tight groups are not critical. I don't know about other states, but I would expect that the SC test is pretty typical.
     
  19. kycol

    kycol New Member

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    I not sure about here in Ky. Because it has changed since I got mine the first year it was available. I'm thinking when I did it 18 rounds, 6 rounds loaded at a time at 9 yards. Now I see on posters for the class to bring like 150 rounds. Also says autos must lock open at last round.
     
  20. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have to disagree with part of this. You can buy a Ruger SR9c for about $400 which is in the same price range as a decent revolver and a lot less than the fancy ones. I do agree with the 9mm being one of the cheapest to shoot for practice. All good self defense rounds will cost no matter what the caliber.
    A carry gun is a very personal decision. Dont get more gun than you can shoot well and quickly. Shot placement is more important than size. A hit with a 380 is better than a miss with a 357. Dont get a gun that is too big/heavy that you wont carry it. Too small a gun will be hard to shoot and unpleasant to practice with.
    A loaded SR9c with a 10 round mag will weigh about 28 oz. A loaded Ruger LCR revolver will weigh about 16 oz and has one of the best out of the box triggers for a revolver.