"Survival Hammer?"

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by Lindenwood, Aug 4, 2009.

  1. Lindenwood

    Lindenwood New Member

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    I have been doing some research, trying to determine the most useful types of tools for various survival situations. A Rip Hammer is (obviously) capable of hammering quite well, the claw can be used to dig reasonably well (better than a stick or a knife, especially with the handle and the ease with which one could sink the claw into the ground). The claw could be mildly sharpened so that it could be used to split wood or even hack off larger limbs (going at it from more or less one end or the other, as opposed to directly perpendicular) if a hatchet or axe is unavailable. The Hammer can obviously be used reasonably well as a non-lethal (with less forceful blows) or a lethal last-ditch defensive weapon. Finally, it can pry (that's pretty much what it's designed to do).

    The first four of those properties could be more useful in wilderness survival, though a small shovel might be better for the things actually needed. A small shovel could obviously dig better, but it could still be used for the mild hammering one wold need for the outdoors (breaking nuts, tapping stakes, etc), and could still be used as a defensive weapon. And, if one edge is sharpened, would likely be better at chopping and splitting than a hammer with a sharpened claw.

    However, for urban survival, a hammer could be much more useful at smashing through obstacles (duh) to evade threats or reach resources. Padlocks could be hammered open, glass could be shattered (with relative ease, at least), or even wooden doors or boarded windows could be busted. And the prying side could be used to help open doors without destroying them (or if its too tough to smash through, like a nice wooden or steel door), or pry back a convertible car's window to unlock the door.

    Finally, if the tool is kept at one's side all the time, and especially if a small container of nails is kept in the pack or close by, one could easily put a few nails into a door or window (or into some boards over said openings) for reinforcement. That last detail could also be useful in wilderness survival for easily putting together more durable shelters or whatever.

    These are the reasons I chose to replace my 20" steel baton with a hammer, because while the baton can do some of these things with mild effectiveness (hammer, for example), it is still primarily a weapon. Conversely, the hammer is a relatively versatile tool. I will probably get something like a pill container to fill with nails.

    Oh, this is the hammer I have:
    [​IMG]
    The head is 22oz and overall it weighs 2.5lbs.


    What do you guys think?
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2009
  2. cameronguyton

    cameronguyton New Member

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    Stanley FuBar I think this might be a little better for what you want.
     

  3. Lindenwood

    Lindenwood New Member

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    I actually have one of those, but I feel it's a little awkward to use efficiently. It's more along the lines of a fire and rescue tool than a general survival tool. My stepdad actually bought it for himself, and he's a pretty burly guy and even he didn't find it very comfortable to use. Plus, using it with one hand as a weapon would be quite difficult without a good bit of practice taming the momentum.
     
  4. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    How about a Vaughan Rigging Ax (also known as Rigging builders hatchet)

    I have one of these in my camping stuff. Used to use it in my short carpenter career many, many years ago for skip sheeting for wood shingle roofs before they went to comp and tile roofs.
     
  5. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    You know Lindenwood, that is a pretty good idea actually. The only thing I have a problem with, and I am in the power industry, is the metal head and tang. It sure could be useful for a lot of things, but a fiberglass tang/shaft sure would prove worth it's less considerable weight in a Live Front or Ground Fault situation....

    I remember someone, I believe it was Blackhawk, made an Urban Sledgehammer that had a claw on one side, a big mallet on the other, and the whole thing was protected against electric shock for like 50,000 Volts. I remember it was a couple of hundred dollars though...

    I like the idea of the hammer, especially in an urban SHTF situation.

    Good thinking outside the box....

    JD
     
  6. Lindenwood

    Lindenwood New Member

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    Thanks! I very seriously looked into fiberglass-handled ones. I tried researching, but I couldn't find any definitive testing showing that the FG handles were as tough as the steel ones (as well as the joint between the head and the handle). I did, however, find lots of anecdotal evidence basically going along with the general believe that an all-steel hammer will be more durable.

    I've never seen any hammer's (or axe's) handles break or even come loose. My stepdad has an OOOOLD Mini Sledge with a slightly wobbly head on the wooden handle, but its still holding up to all the pounding it goes through. But, then again, I've never fought zombies or smashed through doors with a hammer, and I figured the few bucks and few ounces I saved would probably not be worth it when I break the head off trying to get to safety behind a door as undead hands grib my neck :p .
     
  7. matt g

    matt g New Member Supporter

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    A Halligan and 2.5# beater would be a much better option. Halligans are available through most fire supply houses and serve a large number of purposes.
     
  8. bkt

    bkt New Member

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    That's exactly what I've got. There are a few different sizes and probably the smallest would be fine for a BoB.
     
  9. matt g

    matt g New Member Supporter

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    For those that don't know, this is a Halligan:

    [​IMG]

    It's about the same length as a standard axe. I believe that Blackhawk! makes a half length Halligan though.
     
  10. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I like the Vaughan Rigging Ax. I used one years ago framing. I've got one stashed with my BOB stuff.
    [​IMG]
     
  11. ktmboyz

    ktmboyz New Member

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    I like a good drywall hammer. I use it for everything except drywall. It spends most of its life nxt to my wood stove in the garage to split kindling
    [​IMG]
     
  12. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Here you Go Matt! It's good for 100,00 Volts as well. :D
     
  13. Lindenwood

    Lindenwood New Member

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    For wilderness survival I think the hatchet / hammer heads would be far more useful, as the need to chop and split is greatly increased, while the need to pry is really low. Conversely, for urban survival, the usefulness of a prying tool increases dramatically while the need to chop logs and split wood is comparitively reduced.

    So, since I live in an urban area and my emergency BO plans involve trekking part way through my mildly populated city before going through more rural areas to get to my BO Location, I plan for "urban" survival. However, I do have a small camp axe that will likely come along, but in the pack and not on my belt.

    As far as that Fubar goes, while the smaller 15" one has the same 2.5lb weight as my hammer, its reach as a last-ditch weapon is several inches shorter.


    And the Halligan is sweet, but as I said I want something that could easily be carried miles and miles, but especially something that could be used one-handed. The smaller ones could fit that bill, but they would be much more unweildy as a weapon, I think.
     
  14. 753X0

    753X0 New Member

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    Last edited: Aug 4, 2009
  15. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    I guess Hell's Angels were on the right track after all...
     
  16. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    Yep, thats it. That and a cats paw and your set to go for some carpentery. Good for de limbing and splitting small wood. With a little practice it works as a crude ad. As far as a weapon goes, well, I sure wouldnt want anyone swinging that thing at me. Actually witnissed a guy on the crew, not paying attention while driving a 16 greenie overhead with this same rigging ax, split his forehead wide open. Very nasty wound. Many stiches and fractured his skull in one fell swoop.
     
  17. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    How about a Titanium Prybar/Crowbar ???

    JD
     
  18. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    That crash ax looks pretty good too.
     
  19. Lindenwood

    Lindenwood New Member

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    Hmm I'll have to think about it. Off the top of my head it seems that the primary concerns are hammering and its use as weapon. Obviously, it would be difficult to hammer with a round bar. For mild hammering, like tapping stakes into the ground, it wouldn't be a huge deal. But, for "urban" hammering--putting nails into doors and such, I don't think it would do very well. Also, it's light weight would make it quite a bit less effective as a blunt-trauma lethal weapon (the whole thing weighs less than just the head of my hammer, which is still not a lot better than marginal).

    - Harbor Freight Tools - Quality Tools at the Lowest Prices

    Something like this steel model made of square bar would be better for both hammering and use as a defensive weapon. Still, it weighs the same and, IMO, is less effective at both of those things than a rip hammer (partially due to it's lack of a grip since it isn't primarily designed to strike), yet is not going to be significantly better at prying than the hammer.
     
  20. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    I got a 100% Titanium Field Knife. How's about you let me take a couple whacks at you with that and see if you still feel the same way about Titanium as a weapon. :cool::eek:

    JD