Stupid question from a newb reloader

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by fmj, Oct 10, 2011.

  1. fmj

    fmj New Member

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    OK, when i started reloading i started with .357...i screwed up a bunch of bullets. either seating too deep or having my crimp die set wrong and causing the case to "accordian". I didnt like the results i got when i finally did manage to make some good rounds.

    Well i had set aside the my earlier failings. Today i went down and pulled the bullets and reclaimed the powder. Being a frugal kinda guy, my question for the more knowledgable reloaders here is, is there a way for me to reclaim the primers from the casings? Or will my decapping die set off the primer or make it inert?
     
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Decapping will pop the primer in most cases. Sorry, but think they are gone.
     

  3. fmj

    fmj New Member

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    yeah i figured as much...but thought i would ask....more of that silly "beer bottle half full" mentality.

    Thanks anywho.
     
  4. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    you definately dont want to decap a live primer. blow just one (almost a certainty to happen) and you prolly just ruined a pricy sizing die... not cost effective.

    that is of course taking into account you dont spend some time and money in the ER
     
  5. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    i agree with Jon on this, don't try to decap a live primer. if the case is already ruined, just throw the whole thing away after salvaging the bullet and powder. i did the same thing to some of my first 44 specials i reloaded. i forgot to bevel the case inside with the case mouth tool!
     
  6. noylj

    noylj Member

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    Time in an ER for a PRIMER? The decapping pin is pushing it out and any bang will go down to the spent primer area and have no effect on the sizing die. Seems like a lot of overly cautious folks here that have never had a primer go off.
    I have NEVER in 45 years of reloading had a primer go off while decapping. IF you slammed the die down as fast and hard as you can, I still doubt it will go off.
    Also, so what if one goes off? It makes a bang sound, but you are wearing eye protection and hearing protections just is case, right?
    If it goes off, it would propel itself into your spent primer tube or whatever.
    I have "recycled" many primers from my errors or from rounds I that my shooting indicated may be too near max or beyond. Never had any problem reusing them.
    Hope you now know how to set-up the expander, seating, and crimp dies.
    The "dangerout" primer bang is where the primer falls out of the primer slider on a progressive and gets slammed between the primer slide and the primer seating stem. There is a faint possibility of the anvil flying loose and going who knows where. Even if it does hit you (you are still wearing safety glasses, righrt?), it MIGHT scratch your skin and draw a little blood. This is NOT a stick of dynamite. The two times I have had a primer go off, the anvil stayed in and the primer was still cruched between the two parts.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2011
  7. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    noylj, having never had one go off is just being lucky, and at one point you might not be so lucky. some primers have enough force to cause serious bodily damage, enough to maybe put an eye out. and just because you have been lucky, doesn't mean it's safe. many books on reloading tell you not to decap a live primer. now why would they mention this, unless there is a safety concern. giving wrong advise is dangerous, especially to someone new to reloading!
     
  8. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Just remember good ole uncle murphy is a damn fine shot. Just cuz it can be done doesnt mean its a safe thing or a good practice. I can work on the engine of my car while its running but is it a good idea??

    Do you realllllly want to give a new loader this sort of advice then come back and read a post by his loved one telling us what happened and why that person wont be back.

    Most accidents involving injury arent just one thing going wrong but a series of bad decisions and bad practices going wrong at once. The simplest way to minimize or eliminate risk when doing things is to not do something that is self evident to be a bad idea.

    Take one link out and the chain breaks.
     
  9. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    well said JonM. like my father use to say, " if all else fails, read the directions " . seems like good advise when reloading components with the capability to do bodily harm!
     
  10. rjd3282

    rjd3282 New Member

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    Have any of you ever loaded with the old lee loader? You know the thing where you use a mallet to seat primers? They go off frequently and it doesn't hurt at all. Scares the hell out of you but causes no damage. I'm not telling anyone to deprime live primers it's their decision but I have to agree that it isn't much of a big deal I've done it thousands of times and never had one go off.

    I use progressive press and I make sure the primer tube is empty and the powder measure is removed just in case but like I said after all this time and thousands of primers it has never set one off.
     
  11. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    When your decapping your compressing the primer from the inside. The decapping pin gives the force of the primer energy something to work with.

    Judt remember a primed empty case has enough force to shatter the bones in the human skull. If you could raise the dead you could ask bruce lee's son how much damage they can do. It was just a primed case that killed him wasnt even a gun powder blank...
     
  12. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    While I won't advise decapping a live primer,I also have done it many,many times over the years.
    I have never had a primer go off from pushing it back out of the case with a decapping pin.
     
  13. Shade

    Shade New Member

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    First, there is no such thing as a dumb question when it comes to reloading.
    Little things matter and big things can go wrong fast as a result.

    I will agree with Tex I will not advise anyone to decap a live primer.

    If the case will chamber you can always fire the case in your gun and then
    decap it. Remember to handle the gun as if it is loaded with regular ammo
    primers can, if rarely, kill. If the case will will not chamber the case is ruined
    anyway, I would just dispose of it.

    Now I have a universal decapping die, I use that for decapping live primers.

    I do not reuse decapped live primers because I have found 10-20% of them
    will fail when reused. I just have a little fun with a my hammer and anvil
    outside my shop with live deprimed primers. This is not advisable, but then
    neither is decapping live primers.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2011
  14. rockhouse

    rockhouse New Member

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    I'm looking into reloading. Still researching. But I seem to remember somewhere reading that pistol ammo shouldn't be crimped. Not sure of the validity of that statement though.
     
  15. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    there is two types of crimp roll and taper. handgun ammunition for revolvers should be cimped pretty good as revolvers dont have recoil springs and the mass of a moving slide to absorb recoil, this can lead to bullets being pulled a bit out of he case then jamming the revolver solid.

    ammo used in semi autos should be taper crimped. only enough crimp to remove the case mouth flare should be used.
     
  16. Shade

    Shade New Member

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    I will disagree with the "blanket" statement that pistol ammo
    should not be crimped.

    To add to Jon's comments, heavy crimps do not hold much more than
    lighter (but complete) crimps, the case is brass it is only going to get
    you so far. Over crimping can deform the bullet and you can loose
    accuracy.

    Now, I reload .45 ACP and .357 Mag. both are straight walled cases
    and a slight crimp works well on both. I use Lee's Factory Crimp die
    with excellent results.

    When reloading for high accuracy in my bolt guns I do not crimp and get
    slightly tighter groups; often the difference of all the holes touching at
    100 yds or not. But I am also only neck sizing those rounds as they are
    fire formed to my chamber.

    But all my hunting rounds are not only crimped but I seal them around
    the bullet and primer. I have gotten very wet on occasions hunting and
    never want a shot ruined by wet ammo.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2011
  17. fmj

    fmj New Member

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    I crimp my 357 and 44mag loads. I try to get a good "bite" on the bullet with the case. I DO NOT want that bullet moving in or out during recoil. (this is how i got the case "accordianed" on my earliest failings that brought up this topic. too much crimp.)

    I have also been known to seal rounds with clear nail polish ...but have also found they tend to shoot completely different than non sealed.
     
  18. Shade

    Shade New Member

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    Interesting observation, is this on pistol rounds?

    I have not seen a difference on the rifle rounds I seal.
     
  19. fmj

    fmj New Member

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    Yep, pistol rounds. .357..4"barrel..only explanation i can think of is the added pressures created by sealing the bullet to the case. How MUCH different, i dont know. Its something i have been planning on investigating further. (I found out the hard way, in the field :eek:) Havent tried sealing the .44 mags for the rifle as of yet as we havent hunted with it yet.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2011
  20. ahole

    ahole New Member

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    Ok realy do you want to take the chance of a primer going off. in most cases you will have powder near by or other primers. If you like me and have kids then its probably in you best interest just to go buy a new case of primers fro 30 bucks, and not worry with the big OOPS if something dose go wrong. As for the guy that states hes been doing it for 45 years i would say that is very irresponsible to advise a new re-loader to preform a task that has some dangers in that are very unforgiving.