Striker fired vs double actiom

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by Hectocotylus, Jan 27, 2012.

  1. Hectocotylus

    Hectocotylus New Member

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    I am familiar with the difference in revolvers between SA and DA but what are the strengths/weaknesses of striker fired vs DA in a semi auto? Also how do they work? Thanks for your responses
     
  2. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    SA and DA are based upon a hammer providing the force to strike the primer. Striker fired are based upon a spring loaded firing pin, no hammer required. Don't know if I would describe either have a strength or weakness over the other. They're just different.
     

  3. Paladin201

    Paladin201 New Member

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    The definition of SA and DA applies to striker fired guns, just as it does to hammer fired.

    Some striker fired guns are full DA. On these guns, racking the slide does not cock the striker. The striker is pulled back and released by pulling the trigger, like any other DA gun. The advantage to this type of gun is that if you get a misfire, you can restrike by simply pulling the trigger again.

    Other striker fired guns are SA, in that pulling the trigger does not pull the striker back at all. It must be fully cocked first, like other SA guns. When you rack the slide the striker stays cocked. The trigger only releases it.

    Then there are the guns that are sort of in between the two. Guns like my Kahr. The striker must be cocked first in order to fire. Pulling the trigger alone will not fire the gun if it is uncocked. But when it is cocked, the striker is only drawn part way back. Pulling the trigger draws the striker back the rest of the way and then releases it. Since these guns don't have to pull the striker back as far to fire, trigger pull is lighter. But you lose the ability to restrike on a misfire.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2012
  4. Paladin201

    Paladin201 New Member

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    Ignore...double posted
     
  5. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    The drawback i have with a lot of striker fired pistols is the lack of a real safety. Most rely on a trigger safety which does nothing if a foriegn object gets in the trigger guard.

    However i carry a xdm. because its got a grip safety i feel comfy with it. True da guns like sigp220 and revolvers that have no safety i feel comfy because its got that long hard trigger pull for the first shot. Its very unlikely an object will exert enough force to make it go off.

    A true sa gun like a 1911 tend to have manual safeties.

    Other than all the incidents ive seen of glock fail (im not a koolaid drinker) glocks dont have a real safety and people shoot themselves a lot with em for whatever reason. I just personal dont think they are safe enough for me to carry. The sw mp falls into that same category for me also.

    I know lots of people like em im not one of them

    For me a gun has to have some sort of positive safety sa gun or be a true long pull da gun.
     
  6. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    That's one of the things that I found appealing on the Ruger SR9C. I should probably look into how it actually works. :confused:
     
  7. Paladin201

    Paladin201 New Member

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    I certainly see your point, but a lot of people see a manual safety as something that you will forget in the heat of the moment and end up trying to pull the trigger with the safety still on. I know there are validated cases of this. I saw a security camera video of a convenience store robbery. The clerk saw the bad guy drawing a gun as he approached the counter. The clerk drew his own gun, pointed it at the bad guy, and you could clearly see him pulling the trigger on the video. The bad guy shot the clerk. When police arrived, they found the clerk dead, still holding his gun, with the safety still engaged. Not arguing the point, just saying a lot of people feel that way.
     
  8. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    There is a lot to say about becoming proficient with your SD firearm. Muscle memory is also developed. Most of the 1911 people do not even notice when they put the safety in the "fire" position.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2012
  9. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    It all comes down to training. There are folks that carry empy chamber. I find myself unconciously trying to swipe the safety on my xdm and sig220 from time to time. 20 years of 1911 shooting just has ingrained it in me.

    I ruled out a 1911 for my wife because she simply is not going to put in the level of training needed to turn the swipe the safety motion into an automatic reflex.
     
  10. unclebear

    unclebear New Member

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    me personally I prefer something like the 1911 over say a glock 17 because it's full metal and has an external hammer making easier to uncock, along with several external safeties. Most striker fired pistols have polymer lowers, and trigger safety, as said they're ok but if a foreign object gets in the trigger guard they aren't worth a damn. Also like the Taurus PT709 slim it has a firing pin block along with a trigger safety along with a low profile external safety, but still has a polymer lower and is striker fired. They all fire bullets but really it's all personal preference, they're really no technical winner, they've both been proven and work.
     
  11. Chandler51

    Chandler51 New Member

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    I'm not disputing your argument against Glock/M&P on the basis of their lack of an external safety. That's your opinion, and it is valid. However...NOBODY, while following the the rules of firearm safety, has ever accidentally shot themselves. Regardless of the make of the gun or whether it had an external safety.
     
  12. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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    I carried my G31 for many years...i chased dirtbags on foot,fought on the ground numerous times,ran through briars and branches, stood on a firing line to requalify several times,and drew down on people and reholstered probably a thousand times and i NEVER once had a negligent discharge. A negligent discharge is exactly what it is, negligence.. A properly trained and RESPONSIBLE person will go a lifetime without any problems, no matter what the weapon of choice is. Not arguing with anyone,but thats how it is
     
  13. SmokyMtnHiker

    SmokyMtnHiker New Member

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    It looks like this thread turned into kind of a safety debate.
     
  14. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    there are cases of glock leg happening due to holster failure. some models will wear in wrong and a small flap will fold in hile holstering causing the trigger to depress.

    im not saying its going to happen a lot it doesnt. its just a negative buying point i consider.

    after all its just as safe carrying a 1911 cocked round in with safety off as carrying a xdm. you CAN carry a revolver with the hammer cocked long as you keep the finger off the trigger its safe. i dont disagree that gun safety is the usermost of the time, but there are cases of discharges that werent negligent but due to gear failure. that falls under accidental.

    i know everyone has a different look on things ive carried m9 and 1911 as a duty weapon and my unit didnt have a nd until we switched to berretas...

    when a nco cranks off 4 rounds of m60 ammo "clearing" the weapon its an eye opener. he just broke the links off thinking that unloaded the gun flopped it onto the halfdoor at the arms room and yanked the trigger.

    most of the time it takes a whole lot of stupid to get a gun to go off the wrong way.

    ive carried ccw/oc 1911, xdm, ppk, bersa, sig, desert eagle, hk, cz and maybe a few others that i cant remember atm. ive developed my opinion on whats a good carry gun for myself over a long time. i know what i like isnt what everyone else would be comfy with.
     
  15. utf59

    utf59 New Member

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    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7fpeK17grpI"]This video[/ame] isn't the greatest, but it illustrates the basic idea.
     

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  16. Sonic82

    Sonic82 New Member

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    The OP asked "How do they work?"..Not sure if he means... how do they function? Which many have answerd here...or, how do they operate? I'll answer the second question. The advantage of an DA/SA (IMO) is after firing the first shot (long pull), you have subsequent light trigger pull, quick firing shots. The disadvantage is getting proficient at firing it under any conditions. The advantage of a striker-fired weapon is, generally...the have no levers or safeties, simply pull the trigger. The pull is the same with each and every shot, just a longer pull than a single action pull.
     
  17. Hectocotylus

    Hectocotylus New Member

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    Thank you for your responses that clears things up quite well
     
  18. Chandler51

    Chandler51 New Member

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    Like I said, not discounting your opinion. A man likes what he likes, and the reasons you state are valid. You have more exp than me also, so I would hardly have a leg to stand on with anything other than to call it MY opinion.

    What I was addressing was the "Glock" leg phenomenon. As you stated, it is typically due to equipment failure that has nothing to do with the pistol itself. The design is inherently safe, as the trigger MUST be pulled in order for them to discharge.

    I think we do the OP a disservice by making general comments about an entire class of handgun, without pointing to the actual problem, which has nothing to do with the design.

    JMHO