Striker fired pistols - safe to leave loaded for extended periods?

Discussion in 'SIG Sauer Forum' started by dgang, Dec 25, 2019.

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  1. dgang

    dgang Member

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    Just received a striker fired 9mm pistol from my family for Christmas. Up to now I have carried a 3" .357 revolver and just placed it in a safe place when at home. Can I do the same with the striker fired pistol, meaning a round in the chamber and cocked for extended periods of time. Not knowing, it would seem that in would be like keeping a crossbow cocked for weeks or even a month so and be hard and weaken whatever springs and mechanisms involved. Thanks for the input and a merry Christmas to all of you. Dgang
     
  2. sheepdawg

    sheepdawg Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't think it would be a problem but them things are meant to be shot not ignored.:confused:
     
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  3. towboater

    towboater Well-Known Member

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    I should not be a problem.
     
  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Springs weaken from being flexed. Not from being left compressed.

    Think about it- sitting in the driveway is my 1985 F-150 pickup. Sitting on springs that have been under load since the day the frame was assembled. I don't go pick it up each night.



    Of course, if'n it was a Chevy, you might have to......


    Your striker fired pistol is fine. Lugers have more than a century of service, the Astra pistols close behind, and Bill Ruger's .22s over a half century.
     
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  5. PANDEMIC

    PANDEMIC Well-Known Member

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  6. OLD Ron

    OLD Ron Well-Known Member

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    I never leave a loaded gun sit around cocked .
    Just how I was brought up .


    The Ford F150 is a nice truck ...... If you plan to be a mechanic .
    :p
     
  7. Trunk Monkey

    Trunk Monkey Well-Known Member

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    Unnecessary administrative handling increases the chance of a negligent discharge. So you're better off to leave the gun loaded than to unload it every night.
     
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  8. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    He said cocked, that is different than loaded and unloaded. You can leave it loaded without being cocked.
     
  9. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Striker fired, with round in the chamber (if we are applying the conditions in the question by the original poster). will usually mean cocked, or at least partially cocked. There are a few DA/SA striker fired pistols with decockers, but they are more the exception than the rule.

    Want to add a Walther P99 AS to the collection one day.
     
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  10. Trunk Monkey

    Trunk Monkey Well-Known Member

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    You can't decock a striker fired pistol without unloading it.

    This is why no one listens to you because you don't even know that you don't know what you're talking about
     
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  11. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    So if you have eased springs ( pulled the trigger before loading a magazine ) making the gun loaded, is it still cocked or partially cocked. ?
     
  12. Trunk Monkey

    Trunk Monkey Well-Known Member

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    Loaded magazines =/= loaded gun.
     
  13. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think you will find its you that doisent know what they are talking about, have a rethink. You unload it and decock it, and then reload the magazine, it is then loaded and decocked its not difficult.
    Exactly loaded not ready, they are two different things. And you say i don't know what i am talking about LOL.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2019
  14. Trunk Monkey

    Trunk Monkey Well-Known Member

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    Loaded gun

    [​IMG]
     
  15. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You still don't get it, that is loaded and ready. Loaded is inserting the magazine, you then make ready by cocking the firearm. Or by loading the magazine first and releasing the slide.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2019
  16. Trunk Monkey

    Trunk Monkey Well-Known Member

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    Negative Ghost Rider
     
  17. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yeah. Instead of all the drawing practice when you are bored, you should learn the basics including the difference between when a firearm is loaded and ready. Especially before you say others do not know what they are talking about. ;)

     
  18. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    For Outstanding Reliability & Durability!:cool: I have owned and driven ALL of them, that is why I drive FORD's!:D C3 nailed it!!!:cool:
    As for the pistols that are striker fired, they will 'live' longer than most of us so I would not worry about it!!!:)
     
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  19. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    If you shoot your gun several times a year for practice that takes care of your concern.
     
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  20. SGWGunsmith

    SGWGunsmith Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Personally, I don't store ANY of my firearms, or those returned after repair, with the striker compressed or the hammers cocked. What's the point? During a home invasion, and by the time you get your safe opened up you'll most likely have at least two new holes in your shirt.
    This is another one of those "inter-web" argoomints that go nowhere, and it depends on the type of springs being dealt with. Many older shotguns have "V" springs and if those are stored compressed, that condition might kill them in short order. Some revolvers also use that very same style of spring.
    Coil type springs, different critter altogether. As always, they are your weapons and as such, you can treat them however you desire. :)
     
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