stock repair blending

Discussion in 'Engraving & Refinishing' started by crash11049, Feb 10, 2020 at 11:14 PM.

  1. crash11049

    crash11049 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have a problem, I see old beat up guns at a cheap price and I cant resist buying them.
    It's a affliction I have passed on to my sons and I am convinced it is a genetic flaw.
    I am not a gunsmith and this is strictly a hobby, it is something just about anyone can do.
    With very little investment, and a bit of time repairs can be hidden easily.
    After a lot of trial and error I figured out how to hide replaced wood while doing a stock repair.
    I have found that matching grain when repairing a part of a stock is impossible for me.
    The photos below all have had wood replaced, and the grain blended with the stock.
    Its a shame to see someone refinish a stock and have the repair visible, so I hope this helps.
    The photos below all have had wood replaced, and the grain blended with the stock.
    Its a shame to see someone refinish a stock and have the repair visible, so I hope this helps.
    023.JPG 0097.JPG 27.JPG 38.JPG stevens tip up 003.JPG tip up finished wood 002.JPG
    1887 lc smith 2 001.JPG lc 2 002.JPG

    Tools I use:
    Airbrush (a cheap Harbor Freight one is fine) for base coats.
    Paint brushes (a very fine one and a couple of small ones) for graining.
    Bulls Eye Shellac for the finish.
    Ever clear alcohol to thin shellac
    indian ink for graining (Black and brown)
    Testers model enamels for graining and base coat.
    A goose neck magnifier for seeing the small details.

    After the replacement wood is glued and shaped, I seal it with a coat of shellac.
    I then spray a base coat of enamel paint on the repaired area, that matches as closely as possible to the lightest color of the stock.
    Now the fun begins, under magnification I start to match the grain.
    I start from the original grain of the stock, working into the repair area with a brush.
    After that has dried I add a very thin coat of shellac using the French polishing method.
    I keep adding grain, and cover each layer with another coat of thin shellac.
    By doing it this way it gives it depth so the grain is natural looking.
    By doing the repair under magnification you can get more detail, and when you look at it when finished it looks good to the naked eye.
    Hope this helps others that want to do there own repairs.
    And don't worry If you don't like the end result, you can sand or dissolve it off with the grain alcohol.
    here is a link that shows a bit of the process:
    https://www.firearmstalk.com/threads/stock-repair.113148/#post-1687961
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2020 at 11:45 PM
    primer1 and hiwall like this.