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Discussion Starter #1
I was visiting a good friend today who asked me to take a look at a very fine looking .22 rifle he acquired years ago. He's never fired it and, in fact, knew nothing about it; and I mean nothing. I looked it over and told him it was a single shot rifle, which he didn't even realize. I know; how could anyone not know that about a firearm that one owns?

In any event, I looked it over closely and it is very beautiful, a lever action that I'm not familiar with but that looks like something out of the 1800s. It has a heavy barrel and, while the bluing is very good, the name of the manufacturer on the left side of the breach was so worn that I couldn't make out the name. The butt stock though was not worn and had the Stevens name plate on it. It was a gift to my friend many years ago

So does anyone know what this is and how much it might be worth? I'll probably end up with it and do not want to either pay too much for it nor under pay what it is worth to my good friend. He's moving out of the country. Below is a pic I took of it today.

Stevens 22.jpg
 

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I am not by any means very knowledgeable regarding the Stevens Falling Block single shot 22 rifles. However if it is what I think it is a Stevens Walnut Hill Target Model.
Walnut Hill rifles were the top of the line regarding the Stevens single shot Falling Block 22 rifles.
One like this rifle in mint condition can bring over $2000. However even though this is seemingly a nice rifle. The fact that obviously it has been refinished and in doing so prepping it for the refinish job removed most of the lettering from the metal ruining the collector value of the piece. If the bore is good and it functions well. IMO I would think $200-$350 Would be a fair price. I love the Walnut Hills Rifles! A guy I knew of in Anderson, Indiana who had been collecting the Walnut Hills especially and other Falling Block Rifles for years. Had his entire collection of prized, pristine Walnut Hills and others burn up in a house fire. I almost cried myself since I had seen them in the past and it was a fabulous collection! But a pristine Walnut Hill Rifle today is very, very valuable!
But if the bore on this one is in good condition they are very accurate little rifles. And would certainly be worth owning.

03
 

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It is a Stevens Favorite but I dont think the stock is factory and it probably was re-barreled. Nice custom rifle. The block swings down on a pivot screw when the lever is actuated. the Walnut Hill had a pistol grip stock and a similar but different fore end.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks gents. After reading your comments, and viewing 303tom's photo, I agree that it has indeed been modified. I found some pics on line and virtually all had shorter forearms, although they varied a bit in size.

I don't believe it has been re-barreled though from the condition of the bore and also the condition of the action. It appears not to have been fired very much.

I've seen quite a few old firearms over the years that came out of an uncle's or grandfather's closet, with rust on them, which the heir's would foolishly re-blue. The worst example was an original 1873 Colt in 44-40 that a friend showed me back in the late 60s. It had the original worn but relatively intact factory finish. The next time I saw it that beautiful arm had been re-blued. The owner, who knew nothing about firearms, said it would get a better price with new bluing on it.

Even with the modifications, which sadly ruined this very fine piece's collector value, it is still a very nice and very interesting firearm.
 

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According to Sharpe's "Rifle in America" the Stevens Favorites were made with octagonal or half octagonal barrels. A bull barrel on a 22 was not common at the time.
 

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Here is a picture of a rifle like yours. It is a Walnut Hill! I would love to have one but they are very expensive today in excellent condition.
WALNUT HILLS.jpg


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Discussion Starter #10
Now that I've had a chance to get a closer look under bright lights, it has not been reblued. The barrel is a deep blue, with some wear spots but the receiver is has a beautiful, almost bronze like patina with obvious wear. There are no markings at all on the barrel, which also suggests it is a replacement.

I just assume it is a .22 Long Rifle since there is no caliber indicated anywhere. So were they later made with the bull barrel is any that have one a conversion.

Ok, dumb question since I've never even seen one of these much less loaded and fired one. Do you just push a round into the chamber? When I lever it, an extractor comes up from the bottom.
 

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If the rifle is a "Walnut Hill" you're looking at a different gun than a "Favorite" and quite a bit more valuable. Around here, a Walnut Hill will go for well over $500, even drilled and tapped for a scope. Favorites were common boy's rifles and offered in a variety of calibers. Your photo is not of a boy's rifle but a darn nice target rifle in it's day. Buy it.
 

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I have the fourth edition of "Savage & Stevens Arms" by Jay Kimmel. This book is the most thorough compilation involved with all the Stevens so-called 'boys' rifles that I'm, aware of.
The Walnut Hill ( All .22 caliber ) was available in several configurations:

♣ Walnut Hill No. 417 Extremely accurate. 28" long heavy, round barrel. Case frame.
♣ Walnut Hill No.417½ Light weight version. Lighter in frame and barrel. 28" long tapered barrel. Also available in .22 W.R.F. and .25 Stevens.
♣ Walnut Hill No. 418 Take-down type rifle with 26" medium weight round barrel. Same action is on standard version.
♣ Walnut Hill No.418½ Sporting version of the No. 418. 26" tapered round barrel. Also available in .22 W.R.F and .25 Stevens.

All of the above models were grouped together in the "Stevens Favorite" section of this book, but none were specifically said to have been marked "Favorite".
 

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Here is a picture of a rifle like yours. It is a Walnut Hill! I would love to have one but they are very expensive today in excellent condition. View attachment 186418

03
Hello, from across the pond. I. Have a very, very nice Stevens 418 Junior in .25. It is in original condition, great bore, cosmetics and action. Surplus to requirements - but see photos. Any interest? Cheap to clear. Email me Martin
 

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Marseki- Welcome to the forum. However, we see that you have just joined us. Our practice has been that selling is limited to folks that have at least 25 posts here- give us a chance to get to know you. And if you have not been thru the process, the importing of a firearm into the US is...... challenging, to put in mildly. Same for exporting. Good friend donated an Australian Lee-Enfield to their national firearms museum to fill a hole in their collection- it cost him $300 US to jump thru the hoops.
 

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Marseki- Welcome to the forum. However, we see that you have just joined us. Our practice has been that selling is limited to folks that have at least 25 posts here- give us a chance to get to know you. And if you have not been thru the process, the importing of a firearm into the US is...... challenging, to put in mildly. Same for exporting. Good friend donated an Australian Lee-Enfield to their national firearms museum to fill a hole in their collection- it cost him $300 US to jump thru the hoops.
Hello there.
Thank you for your guidance. I must apologise for my newbie clumsiness, no breach of protocol was, or is, intended. Permit me to introduce myself. My g'father and father were life members of our NRA, and I first held a firearms license some 35 years ago, starting with full bore pistols - a far cry from the state of what is now "allowed" here today.

I first visited Bisley with my grandfather - a keen rifleman, when I was about 10 years old and the sense of comaraderie amongst individuals with common interest has remained with me.

When I came across the Stevens and found out through online research that it was a "Walnut Hill" model - after one of your famous rifle ranges, my interest was piqued.

So, enough for now, and I look forward to enjoying reading other members posts and perhaps contributing where I can. I do also have a keen interest in pre WW2 Webley & Scott air pistols and may be a resource in that area.

Kind regards,

Marseki55
Marseki- Welcome to the forum. However, we see that you have just joined us. Our practice has been that selling is limited to folks that have at least 25 posts here- give us a chance to get to know you. And if you have not been thru the process, the importing of a firearm into the US is...... challenging, to put in mildly. Same for exporting. Good friend donated an Australian Lee-Enfield to their national firearms museum to fill a hole in their collection- it cost him $300 US to jump thru the hoops.
Hello.
I must apologise for my newbie error - I did not intend any breach of forum protocol.

Please permit me to introduce myself.
I am a 3rd generation rifle and pistol man, my grandfather and father being Life members of our NRA since the mid 1950's. I well remember my first visit to Bisley Camp at age 9 or so, and the sense of cameraderie of like minded individuals was impressive. I acquired my first licensed firearm some 35 years ago!
As an aside, I have a keen interest in pre WW2 Webley and Scott air pistols - I attach an image a couple of prewar "Senior" models. I offer my resource in this area to any interested members of the Forum.

I look forward to reading future posts from members.

Marseki55
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The owner, who knew nothing about firearms, said it would get a better price with new bluing on it.
Yuppers. Rebluing just the barrel of a friend's near-mint 1894 Winchester - a VERY early steel barrel version with just a TWO digit serial number - after having the crown 'tidied up' - turned a $5000 rifle into $1500 clunker right there.
 
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