Stevens 12 ga restoration

Discussion in 'DIY Projects' started by DIY_guy, Apr 7, 2014.

  1. DIY_guy

    DIY_guy New Member

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    All the restorations I have posted lately have begun with a bit of background or history about the gun about to be restored. Unfortunately that wont be the case with this 100 year old single shot 12 ga because I don’t know what it is beyond the fact that it’s a Stevens and it was made between 1900 and 1916. Based on the low number I suggest its on the earlier end of that range. I asked for help identifying this gun on a variety of boards and so far I have only been able to rule out guns that it is not.

    Its not a Stevens 125, 115 or 105 or 107 or a 94 and a long list of others that it is not. This is proving to be a problem since locating a replacement stock for a 100 year old gun you don’t know the model number of is tough. I picked up the shotgun at an estate sale because it looked like a challenge. (I love those) and the price was right.

    Like other restorations it’s a mess but I like to take what are essentially $10 guns and put 30 or 40 hours and $100 into them and turn them into $15 guns. (it’s a sickness, I know) It doesn’t have to make sense it only has to be enjoyable.

    So here it is in all its broken glory.

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    Thats a brass screw above the firing pin even though the years have given it a black petina.

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    The thing about identifying this make is the joint were the stock meets the receiver. Most of the advertising (that can be found) shows a crescent shape in the stock/receiver joint like this. As well as a screw head for a removable screw at the front of the receiver where the barrel pivots.

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    But this make has a straight joint and no removable pin for the barrel pivot.

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    It also has a checkered stock and only certain Stevens of this vintage had that. But as you can see, both the butt and fore arm stock need replacing. For this gun I would rather buy a replacement than make one since spring his here and I have lots of outdoor tasks to take on.

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    If you are a Steven authority and can shed some light on this gun, please do so. I don’t know if it helps but there are no internal coil springs in the receiver. All the springs are flat stock.

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    And this is how the fore stock mounts.

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    The barrel lug

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    Normally I start with the wood due to dry times of the finish but for this one I have no wood so it may remain an incomplete restoration until I learn more about which make this gun is so as to locate a stock.

    At any rate, Ziploc bags of naval jelly have their work cut out for them.

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    To be continued…..
     
  2. seancslaughter

    seancslaughter New Member

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    Looking forward to the rest of this thread I love reading your restorations and am in the process of finding my own gem in the rough to try my hand at restoring. One idea did you think it might be a prototype model? I mean it looks so similar to some of the other models you mentioned that unless you really look you can't tell at a glance. Maybe the estate you bought it from one of the family members might of had some connection to the company to receive a prototype or one off model.


    Sent from my iPhone using Firearms Talk
     

  3. DIY_guy

    DIY_guy New Member

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    I picked the brain of a living relative of the late owner. The guns were his late fathers and grandfathers. The late owner had 7 sisters who know nothing of the guns.I was speaking to a brother in law of the late owner. I may be able to buy a stock for another make and modify it to work on this gun. THat is an option but would prefer the correct stock of course.
     
  4. seancslaughter

    seancslaughter New Member

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    Man this is a tough one I have not much to do today so I have been googling like crazy trying to help and every single break action single shot 12 gauge from them has that half moon style stock joint except the hammerless models. Its frustrating I can't even imagine how frustrating it is for you. I have a feeling your gonna have to end up making one for this restoration. I still think that this one was a one off shotgun perhaps as an experimental model because the only ones I see that have that straight edge are either hammerless or the double barrels they produced.
     
  5. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Last edited: Apr 7, 2014
  6. DIY_guy

    DIY_guy New Member

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    Thanks but its neither. Both are far more current than the one I am restoring. I combed all the gun auction sites and found those and others. hte one you listed have different features and one even has a secrial number and well as different info stamped on the gun denoting a different era. The receiver stamping on mine indicates it was made between 1900 and 1916 (at which point receivers were stamped with diff info.
     
  7. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Have you considered the research value of séances?

    :D

    Good luck!
     
  8. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Savage has a model Finder. You simply type the serial number into a text box and you will at least get the years that sequence of serial numbers was used. Before Savage bought the Stevens brand Stevens merged with other manufacturers and was sold more than once.

    I have a Savage/Fox Model B that isn't quite as old as yours. I don't know the year it was made but the gun design was patented in 1931. The B model is incredibly durable. The chances are if you see a SxS on a skeet range it is a version of the fox shotgun. There are other SxS double barrels that have withstood the test of time but none of them got prettier with care like a fox.
     
  9. DIY_guy

    DIY_guy New Member

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    Thanks but sadly there are no serial numbers or modle numbers on this gun. The clover and the 55 are the only markings. I do know it was made between 1900 and 1916 and while the date is interesting the make is what I am searching for.
     
  10. DIY_guy

    DIY_guy New Member

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    I have already tried the magic 8 ball and a Ouija board and have been breaking open fortune cookies looking for an answer so yes I am open to all options at this point.
     
  11. DIY_guy

    DIY_guy New Member

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    All the parts were de-rustified (Is that a word?) and then cleaned up and given a brushed finish. Im messing around with Herters (now Arts) Belgian as an alternative to cold bluing. I tried the trigger guard first. Its more effort than wipe on cold blue since it involved boiling the parts and repeatedly applying the blue, carding, boiling but it gives the part a darker black (and more matte) appearance than cold bluing. It’s the cross between rust bluing and cold bluing.

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    The remaining part were cold blued with Nu-Blu

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    There is a coloration difference but I have not ruled out dissimilar metals as being the cause.

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    At any rate, I maintain the option of stripping down all the parts and using Belgian blue on all the parts.

    Here is it back together again.

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    The next step is stripping and rebluing the barrel. Its not in terrible shape as far as rust goes but it does have a few dings and some rust pitting in the metal that will remain.

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    I will remove the barrel lug and mount the barrel in my wood lathe and give it a 220, 320, 400, 600 grit job and then steel wool. I plan to use the Belgian blue on the barrel which means I need to fashion a tank to boil it in.

    Since I was going to be using the Belgian blue any way and wanted to rule out dissimilar metal I took a couple of old bolts and cut the heads off and cleaned them up to 400 grit and applied Nu-Blu to one and Belgian blue to the other then I placed them both in a bag of Strike hold for 24 hours. Here are the results after a wipe down.

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    While the pictures do a poor job of showcasing the difference, its clear that the Belgian blue is deeper, blacker and more matte than the cold blue.

    Since the weather is nicer and because the barrel is larger than a trigger guard and because of the Mercuric Chorlide in the Belgian blue I want to do this bluing outside. My boiling tank will be heated by my 5 burner gas BBQ grill with a tank of suitable size that still need to be made.

    To be continued…….
     
  12. Steel_Talon

    Steel_Talon New Member

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    In for the progress...:)
     
  13. orangello

    orangello New Member

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  14. DIY_guy

    DIY_guy New Member

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    Yes somebody sent me that and that is an exact match to this gun only 50 numbers away (mine is stamped 55) saddly they do not list a make or model number either. I was stoked when I saw it hoping for a model number. It is a perfect match to this gun in every way.
     
  15. deg

    deg Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    "Ziploc bags of naval jelly have their work cut out for them."

    DIY_Guy would you mind explaining how the naval jelly works or maybe what the stuff is?
     
  16. DIY_guy

    DIY_guy New Member

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  17. DIY_guy

    DIY_guy New Member

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    Here a few pics from the Belgian bluing process.

    Everything at the ready.

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    Rust scum floating on top.

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    After the fifth dip and application.

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    The hot barrel evaporates the water and blue quickly showing the rusting

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    Then the plugs are removed and sure enough no water crept into the barrel since the plugs are dry.

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    A new and longer plug is put in one end of the barrel has a handle so I can apply copious amounts of Strike hold, water displacing oil/rust inhibitor to the barrel.

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    The oiled barrel.

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    Here is an outside video of the newly blued and oiled barrel.

    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rm4mIyyoKhY[/ame]

    All that’s left to do is give it 24 hours in the strike hold, make a new stainless steel front bead and put the gun back together with the old stock (since that’s all I have at this point)

    To be continued…….
     
  18. DIY_guy

    DIY_guy New Member

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    Ive gone as far as I can go with this gun until a stock is sourced (or made). Thanks for all the input in tracking down the make of the shotgun. It appears this is a Stevens Number 100 based on the hammer and finding an exact match on Numrich’s web site. Here’s where it stands right now.

    I made a stainless front bead to replace the missing bead.

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    Here are some pictures of the resurrected gun with the old (broken) stock back on the gun for the time being.

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  19. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    It's odd to see one with such beautiful metal finish & such antiqued wood; maybe it could have some "rat rod" appeal?
     
  20. Que

    Que Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    with how the metal turned out it sure deserves new stock. thats some fine work you've done to it sir