Standard or compact 9mm?

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by cals400ex, Sep 22, 2011.

  1. cals400ex

    cals400ex New Member

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    I am new into the handgun scene. I am looking to get a 9mm for home defense, targets, plinking, etc. I will NOT carry this around (I live in Illinois). I am unsure which make/model I would like to go with because I have not shot many before. However, would you recommend a standard or compact for my needs?
     
  2. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    the only advantage to compact guns is concealed carry.

    get a full size. they are more pleasent to shoot, have less wear problems (the short springs on compacts have to be changed very frequently), higher capacity, and a longer sight radius making it far far easier to hit the target.

    i would also suggest renting a few at a range that does rentals to try before you buy.
     

  3. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

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    Full size or compact; get what fits you, your grip, your comfort level, pocket book, and application. It would also be nice to have a handgun you can control and therefore be accurate with. Try them, shoot them and then you will be confident in what you choose to buy.
     
  4. nccinstaller

    nccinstaller New Member

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    I would def suggest a full size if your not going to carry unless you have small hands and a fullsize is uncomfortable. I always enjoy shooting my full sizes much better than my compacts more accurate and less recoil. If your open to suggestions check out the beretta 92fs great 9's for the money and super reliable
     
  5. dks7895

    dks7895 New Member

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    The others make valid points. I do not conceal... but do open carry on the farm. I recently purchased a Ruger SR9c and couldn't be happier. Comes with 17rd and 10rd mags. The trigger is sweet and the price is right. I paid $429 for mine... and sold off the Taurus PT92AFS.
     
  6. Firearms4ever

    Firearms4ever New Member

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    I recommend you got to some gunshops and look at the various firearms they have and see what feels the best to you.
     
  7. sweeper22

    sweeper22 New Member

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    Because of the above points in red, I would advise you start with a steel/alloy full-framed 9mm. They've got higher capacity (vs compacts) and are just easier to become proficient with due to the increased weight and sight radius.

    I think CZ offers the best new steel 9mm pistol for the money, but I also really like the Browning Hi-Power and alloy Sigs like the P226. Beretta M9/92 is also a good option if you have larger hands.

    Only get a compact if it fits your hand better.
     
  8. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    +1 on sweeper22's recommendation for the Browning HP.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. sweeper22

    sweeper22 New Member

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    It's hard to go wrong with a classy, hi-cap steel 9mm.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Nra-Life-Member

    Nra-Life-Member New Member

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    The HP is an excellent weapon.
     
  11. cals400ex

    cals400ex New Member

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    how much will a sig 226 or a hi power (9mm) cost me? can they be bought for $800 (new)? i know the prices vary a lot depending on where you get the gun from. i live in illinois and i am not sure what shipping or other fees are usually charged.
     
  12. cals400ex

    cals400ex New Member

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    what do you mean when you say the steel framed guns have higher capacity? i am 5'9" and 165 pounds. my hands are not larger than normal either.
     
  13. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Last edited: Sep 23, 2011
  14. sweeper22

    sweeper22 New Member

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    Full-framed guns have greater capacity than compacts. Metal framed are heavier than polymer.

    Typical pricing for basic models...

    BHP- $900 new, $600+ used
    Sig P226- $800 new, $600+ used
    CZ 75b- $550 new, $400+ used

    I landed a really decent used BHP for $500, and I've seen solid used Sigs down close to $500 as well...but neither is common. I also landed a new 75b for $409.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2011
  15. sweeper22

    sweeper22 New Member

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    One more thing:

    If you're a new shooter on a budget, and you don't really even know what you like just yet...I think some of the HP clones from FEG, Arcus, and FM Argentine are really good beginner's guns for about $400 give or take. I've shot a couple, and they seemed to be really solid.

    My own opinion would be that a new CZ will offer max quality for your buck though.
     
  16. group17

    group17 New Member

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    If you have $800 to spend you can buy pretty much anything you want.Go check them all out and don't jump on the first day of looking. Shop around.

    I have all metal and plastic pistols. I don't prefer one over the other. I think you can buy fine weapons in both materials.
     
  17. Glockpotion23

    Glockpotion23 New Member

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    Yes, everything dunerunner said.
     
  18. Bagger

    Bagger New Member

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    To the original poster in Illinois ... I have quite a few HGs and nearly all are 9mm. Reasons are: ammo is plentiful, relatively cheap (compared with .45 cal), concealed carry is pretty good, stopping power is good, the recoil is moderate .. so, your wife can semi-enjoy shooting, too.

    I agree with some of the posters ... you need to buy what "feels" good in you hands. I have wide palms, but short fingers ... by comparison to golf, I wear a large/cadet (if that means anything to you).

    But, I disagree with several posters in their recommendations.

    My favorite CC is a Bersa/Firestorm 380. No, it;s not a 9 mm .. but, it conceals very well on my (now wrecked) mountain bike's down tube, and motorcycles and I shoot it well. My daily carry is a S&W M & P 9C (which is a 9 mm semi-auto with around 10-12 rnd capacity.

    If you only want to shoot targets and use the gun for home defense, I would recommend the S&W M&P 9mm. There are several palm swell pieces that allow for different sized hands, it has relatively low recoil, S&W has excellent customer service and product quality (also, made in the USA), high standard capacity of 16+1, modern gun function/safety, not all that heavy and accurate to shoot IMO. 3 factory mags give you nearly 50 rnds of protection.

    This is the gun I'd recommend for a home defense HG ... and, maybe get a defensive 20 gauge (not 12 gauge) pump shot gun, too ... but, that's a different discussion.

    Little guns with short barrels are not fun to shoot IMO, or experience. My SO hates them. You need to have something you "enjoy" shooting so you will practice often and get comfy with the gun. LCPs, 2" barrel wheel guns and 9 mm small compacts (there are several) are what I'm talking about. Some may differ with my experience and that is fine. Everyone's experience differs ... some guys ride across country on a HD Sporster instead of a Goldwing, eh.

    Please excuse my typing as it's just left handed.
     
  19. cals400ex

    cals400ex New Member

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    can the cz 75b compete with the sig 226? how do these compare in terms of reliability, ease of use, accuracy, durability, etc.? i have the money to spend on the sig, but i don't know what makes it worth a few hundred more than the cz.
     
  20. Mitch

    Mitch New Member

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    full size

    go full size. the only thing a compact is a a compromise on capacity, sight radius, recoil, accuracy, all in need of a smaller gun to conceal as an edc weapon. they are just overall harder to use effectively. While they can perform as well as the full size, it takes more practice and the learning curve is less with a full size pistol. good luck