Spring Fatigue

Discussion in 'AK & SKS Discussion' started by MajorMoeDown47, Jul 23, 2013.

  1. MajorMoeDown47

    MajorMoeDown47 New Member

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    whats causes spring fatigue for ak mags in all calibers!??
     
  2. rhyno13

    rhyno13 New Member

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    Years of loading and unloading.
     

  3. austin92

    austin92 New Member

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    ^^^^this. Most people think it's leaving them loaded, not true
     
  4. MisterMcCool

    MisterMcCool Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I thought that too.
     
  5. MajorMoeDown47

    MajorMoeDown47 New Member

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    what about pump shotguns if i leave one shell or a full tube does that cause fatigue?
     
  6. 7.62 Man

    7.62 Man New Member

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    No springs are used to being compressed & relaxed.
    The springs on your car don't sag out by having a full tank of gas, they get weak from shock like hitting a pot hole or over compression like turning a sharp corner with a heavy load.
    If you tried to jam an extra round into your full shotgun may damage the springs.
     
  7. bildee

    bildee New Member

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    normally, it's just from a low grade of steel, bad heat treat, in other words, poor manufacture. quality gun springs do what they are designed to do, for decades. If you exceed the design parameters in some way, you can expect higher rates of failure, with any part of any device.
     
  8. austin92

    austin92 New Member

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    If a spring is LEFT compressed OR relaxed it doesn't affect it's life. It's the loading and unloading that causes wear
     
  9. kbd512

    kbd512 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    While it is true that you can damage or unduly fatigue a spring by forcing it in a direction that inhibits its ability to "spring back" into shape (pulling it apart or over-compression), any properly designed and manufactured magazine spring will experience fatigue in normal use through compression and decompression cycles. Problems with set and creep are mostly poor design or manufacturing quality control and, yes, selection of unsuitable materials based on cost. All materials have a fatigue limit and spring steels are no exception.

    Springs are typically made from cheap high carbon or stainless steels, and the properties of those base materials are not particularly well suited for use in springs that will encounter a large number of cycles or high loadings. Chrome silicon steel stock is a more suitable material for springs that will experience a large number of cycles or high loading.

    Flat wire springs tend to work a little better than round wire springs because they are able to sustain greater compression and the shape of the material is more suitable for applications with uni-directional loading similar to what a buffer spring would experience.

    That's my layman's understanding of how such things work based on an explanation from someone who knows. If you want to know more, contact a mechanical engineer, metallurgist, and people who make springs. There are plenty of excellent explanations, although most are quite technical, about the failure modes for springs and spring materials.