Some knives I recently made and sold

Discussion in 'Other Weapons' started by wahooknifemaker, Jan 15, 2014.

  1. wahooknifemaker

    wahooknifemaker New Member

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    Hi,
    As of today, I only have one order for a custom handmade knife pending and the customer is still considering which blade blank to select.
    That means I can now start making knives as an inventory for sale. Not sure what I'll make first.
    Guess I'll look at my blades, look at my finished antler and exotic material handles and let the spirit move me. I was pretty busy right before Christmas and surprised how many people contacted me from my website, porters knives.com. It's recently been updated, but I still have quite a few blades, finished handles and sheaths that aren't pictured on the web pages.
    The attached photos show knives I made before the first of the year. Critiques are welcome because I strive for continuous improvement. If you see any knives with handles or blades you like and want one for yourself or a gift, it would be an honor to make one for you guys.
    By the way, I have a good inventory of my antler handles that have been carved with subjects such as eagles, bears, Whitetail bucks and other images. I have one wonderful 3D carved eagle handle, so I guess I'll also attach a picture of that for your review. My antler handle carver is Rob Roberts of Nampa, Idaho, who operates R2rockz art studio.
    Take care,
    Randy
    402-443-4947
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Dan308

    Dan308 New Member

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    wow that is one cool looking blue eagle. Do you make the blades? What steel are they made from?
     

  3. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    You do some beautiful work , wow..! :)
     
  4. wahooknifemaker

    wahooknifemaker New Member

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    Hi,
    Thank you for the kind words.
    No, I don't fabricate steel. I can buy 440C high carbon stainless steel blade blanks of various sizes and styles cheaper, more conveniently and with better quality than I can make.
    I buy direct from a supplier who designs the blades, has them manufactured to high specifications and sells wholesale to most of the retail knife supplies retailers. He won't promote the 420C "mystery steel" from Pakistan. The supplier will provide the cheap junk steel blades if someone wants them, but he makes it clear they are strictly "practice" knife-making blades.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2014
  5. wahooknifemaker

    wahooknifemaker New Member

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    Hi,
    I appreciate the compliment.
    My skills, techniques and materials as much better than five years ago, and even better than last year. I seek advice from professional knife makers who are willing to share it, although I make it clear I'm not after any proprietary information about their products or processes.
     
  6. yazul42

    yazul42 Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Some very nice work there wahoo,, some of the bolstered knives remind me of some early Ruana knives,, very nice indeed.
     
  7. BillDeShivs

    BillDeShivs Member

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    While you do good work, I don't consider anyone who doesn't make their own blades a knifemaker. Knife customizer, hobbyist, etc., but not knifemaker. Most professionals feel the same way.
     
  8. KimberFan

    KimberFan New Member

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    The best advice?....enjoy it.....period.

    I think every "knifemaker" gets his teeth sharpened somehow and some good blade makers I know started on pre made blanks. I forge my own stuff because when I started it, nobody sold blanks...(back when the rocks were still warm) but I feel there's got to be a starting point and, working on blanks first is not an issue with me. I think after awhile, you'll find yourself interested in making your own blades....with that, I'd suggest buying a Grizzly Knife belt grinder and play around with it and see if you want to step up to a Bador or something similar. The Grizzly has an issue with the motor being in the way to some degree for me but, I know a few who put out nice work on them. I always practice with a couple good ol' paint sticks before I grind a damascus blade just to get "The feel" of nestling in to do my plunge on the real McCoy so as not to waste the metal on a goof. Another thing I encourage folks looking into knifemaking is to attend some hammer-in's functions sponsored by local blacksmiths. They are so informative and you'll get involved with other "like minds". Knifemaking is hobby for some, an income for others, decide what it will be for you and practice. Make it your best if you're going to put your touchmark on it. Again.... Enjoy!! ;)
     
  9. wahooknifemaker

    wahooknifemaker New Member

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    You're right,
    I don't claim to be a knife maker.
    I am a hobbyist. I state that clearly on my website.
    If I inadvertently implied otherwise, I apologize. I guess writing, "knives I recently made" kinda does that. Perhaps you can suggest a way for me to edit that such as "handles I recently hafted to blade blanks," or something like that.
    Thanks, man
     
  10. wahooknifemaker

    wahooknifemaker New Member

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    How true,
    I buy blade blanks because I don't have the resources such as money, equipment, space, time and knowledge to forge my own blades.
    Even if I did, until I master the learning curve, they wouldn't be as good as the blemish- and defect-free 440C high carbon stainless steel blanks I buy. One thing I do that some other knife hobbyists don't, however, is limit myself to buying hidden tang blanks.
    The styles and sizes available, and quality, is limited. I primarily buy full tang blade blanks then cut and grind them into stick/rat tail tangs. While the long vertical cuts aren't that difficult, consider the horizontal cuts near the bolster or guard. I leave about an 1/8 or 1/16 of the tang attached to the hilt, then use my Dremel tool with a cutting wheel to make it and even and the rest of the spot where the bolster and tang are joined. While it's not forging blades, it's more challenging that poking a pre-fab tang in a hole in an antler filled with epoxy and calling it a knife. I specialize in the handles and hafting them to the blade blanks. Some people do it all, including making the leather sheaths. I order mine custom made from a leathersmith. I don't think a hobbyist has to be a master of every aspect of a craft to enjoy it.
     
  11. BillDeShivs

    BillDeShivs Member

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    And I agree with you. Thank you for understanding my post and not being offended. :)
     
  12. yazul42

    yazul42 Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I too am a hobbyist and for a while felt incomplete so to speak, because I did not have access to a forge or a mentor to show me the ropes of forging, tempering and heat treating. While attending a Hammer-In several years ago, my feelings were laid to rest. A gentleman who is widely known, but shall remain nameless for his privacy, told me that a maker did not have to be a blade smith,, he concurred that many feel you do, but in his opinion there was a difference. To me, I would certainly enjoy learning to forge and create the blades I would use to make knives, at this time it is not possible, but I still enjoy working with blade blanks, crafting handles, scales , and using some rather unorthodox materials for guards, etc., for the joy and appreciation of the art that it brings to me. I have sold many knives basically to reimburse for the material costs, I don't feel that I am good enough to have someone pay for my time and those who have the ability and gift to make knives from billets, chunks of iron, carbon, chromium, and other elements, I definitely salute you,, I need to get back to a Hammer-In again, they are a lot of fun and I really enjoy seeing the masters ply their trade, good luck in your work.
     
  13. BillDeShivs

    BillDeShivs Member

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    Hafting is a noble craft, and as long as a customer is advised the blade is pre-made there is absolutely nothing wrong with it. I still enjoy doing it.
    And, using pre-made blades is much preferrable to using old saw blades and scrap steel by someone who knows nothing about blade beveling or heat treatment-which is all too common.
     
  14. Learning2MakeDo

    Learning2MakeDo New Member

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    Hello Neighbor

    Hi Randy-
    Just found you on Firearms Talk. I have seen some of your knives on FB. It looks like you are turning out some nice work. I'll bet they look even better in person.
    I don't live far from you- by Leshara. I have worked with metal much of my life, among other things. I ventured into knifemaking about three years ago. I guess I have only made two 'serious' knives so far, both for gifts to family. I'm now working on a third, for another Christmas gift.
    Just wanted to tell you Hi- maybe we could meet up some time and compare notes (shoot the breeze) over a coffee or pop.

    I'm still exploring Firearms Talk and am anxious to check out the community here. It looks like good people.
    Merry Christmas to you and all the Firearms Talkers!

    Bill
     
  15. WebleyFosbery38

    WebleyFosbery38 New Member

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    I think your knives are beautiful, very nice. Interests beget hobbies which beget craftiness which begets professionalism if you stick with it long enough. Lots of people arent in a place where they can do everything that comes with a skilled art, forging your own blades is cool but not practical always. All it means is the final product is the outcome of more than one persons skills and thats awesome also.

    An old Indian Friend of mine was a world renowned knife, sword maker for decades. He took our scout troop on really cool expeditions digging up wampum and other Iroquois Nation treasures around the hills and dales of our rural homefronts when I was a kid. Howard Lemery made pieces for museums and collections that were as fine or better than most famous makers could create. Me and my buddies would often go up to his little shop and watch him forge and grind beautiful pieces. Many of his blades were made from vehicle spring steel, he said it was the best if you knew how to handle and harden it. Understand, this was long before the internet and many of the very special metals now common and easy to get and he was not a wealthy man. His shop was little more than a one stall garage with some basic grinding and forging tools, most welders have way better equipment but he was a master with just a very few tools, few were motorized.

    I have one he made for me for my 16th birthday. A Survival Knife, nothing flashy or show worthy, just a workhorse that holds an edge like gorilla glue. Inside the handle is matches, a small piece of treated Cloth for fire starter, a razor blade, fishing gear and a couple other small trinkets he thought would come in handy in a pinch without any real weight added. To get to the stuff, you have to smash the solder sealed maple handle. He promised to replace it for nothing if I actually had to use it, luckily, I never did but still to this day wonder whats inside.

    Howard has been gone for almost 30 years now so Im pretty sure the warranty is up on the handle but the blade he made out of a really thick fine tooth saw blade still hold an edge like the day he handed it to me. His stuff never was blingey, just made to do what it was sold to do, his hallmark is almost gone from the blade but anyone around her that knows Howards work recognizes the specialness of my little survival knife. RIP Howard, God bless you Sir!
     

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  16. wahooknifemaker

    wahooknifemaker New Member

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    Hi neighbor,
    Yes, it would be great to meet you.
    Feel free to contact me. My cell phone number is 402-443-2308.
    I look forward to hearing from you and wish you a joyous holiday season.
    Randy Porter