softest acceptable wood

Discussion in 'DIY Projects' started by mattybock, Feb 25, 2014.

  1. mattybock

    mattybock New Member

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    Here's the straight and narrow of it; there is no hardwood anywhere near me. Lots of pine, lots of cedar, and that's it. I am not driving 150 miles to Arkansas on a gamble just to see worm eaten hardwood letovers.

    So, what would happen if I used pine or cedar? Would it split down to the comb and cost me an eye? Would it tear the fabric of reality and invert the universe? Or would it just ding up real easy and not look very nice at all?
     
  2. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    What are you building?

    better judged by twelve than carried by six.
     

  3. mattybock

    mattybock New Member

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    This the stock to a kentucky long rifle. Is it potentially dangerous or just cheap looking?
     
  4. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    Cheap looking. Pine or cedar should easily handle the recoil. You may have warping issues and run into knots while working on it. Should be fine though.

    better judged by twelve than carried by six.
     
  5. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    You will likely have trouble with the inletting also.
    Soft wood is a poor choice. Go to the lumber yard and see if they have any hardwood.
     
  6. mattybock

    mattybock New Member

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    well that's the trick of it. There aren't any. Lots of saw mills who do god knows what with what they cut, which is probably all pine. I'm going to do two things;
    - experiment with the recoil absobing abilities and durability of a softwood stock
    - see what it's going to cost to order wood from up north
     
  7. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    this-will-not-end-well-15.jpg

    This will not end well........

    Pine/cedar will be too soft for screws and pins. If you are willing to whittle, you can order a stock blank of properly cured walnut, oak, maple, etc. takes a while for that stuff to properly cure so that it does not check, split, crack.

    There are good reasons that smiths did not use pine- and it was not for the looks.
     
  8. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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  9. DIY_guy

    DIY_guy New Member

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    I would not use pine even if you soaked the wood in minwax wood hardener. Order wood online or cut apart a hardwood table for the wood. You can find garage sale tables to reclaim the wood or wait till the neighbor heads off to work and take one that he isnt using at the moment. :)
     
  10. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    I'd be more worried about uncured, unseasoned wood, than the particular

    species. Even if you found an Oak, or Walnut, the fresh wood will let

    you down.
     
  11. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I made a stock out of pine. It was an experiment. It really dings up easily. I can look at it from across the room and a ding will appear. But it did work. It is a 7mm TCU round that is fires. It is not a heavy recoil round. But it is not a 22 either.
     
  12. dteed4094

    dteed4094 New Member

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    Most pallets are hard wood, In my area most are made from Oak. I made a really nice butt stock for a friend from red oak, turned out it had beautiful grain but was quite heavy.
     
  13. awahlster

    awahlster New Member

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    Boyds Gun stocks also sell blanks
     
  14. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    There are Pecan trees in Texas. Any tree that bears a large fruit, or nuts is usually a hard wood. Proper curing would be required.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2014
  15. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    i have never seen a gun stock made from pecan, but have seen furniture that was. it has some very nice grain patterns and looks great.
     
  16. Mouser

    Mouser Member

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    Pecan is in the hickory family and if you ever try to split hickory, you will see that is doesn't split well...though it is hard and difficult to work.

    Ash is a really good material to work as is Walnut...similar density and shrinkage/warpage properties.

    Maple in the south is predominantly "soft maple" and maple in the north and north east is "hard maple"....just different species groups making them up, but like their namesake, they are different densities and I would not use soft maple for a gun stock.

    If you can find it, beech or sycamore is nice too....you may find some hardwood lumber at a small building supply distributor, even in TX

    I would not use Pine but Cypress is considered a whittler's wood but is rare as hen's teeth....but maybe since you are close to AR and Louisiana, there may be some available.
     
  17. JRAndres99

    JRAndres99 New Member

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    Your location says Dallas. I find it extremely hard to believe that you can't find a chunk of hardwood in Dallas.


    Sent from my iPhone using Firearms Talk
     
  18. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Most pallets are made of poplar which isn't known for it's hardness. Poplar makes good veneer, not gun stocks.
     
  19. deg

    deg Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Lowes don’t have a hardwood selection? That’s just weird. Surely, there is a “wood working” supply store in Dallas that has hardwoods. Use pine if you must, I am confident you will quickly regret using cedar.
     
  20. dteed4094

    dteed4094 New Member

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    When poplar is dry it is very hard. Considered one of the best for truck beds. Beech, and maple are heavy but I've seen both used for stocks. There are a lot of pallets made of oak in my neck of the woods. I googled hardwood, Dallas and found several sources in Dallas.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2014