Snow chains ....?

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by dango, Dec 3, 2019.

  1. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I really don't know much about them . I won't be able to shovel any more , just can't take the chance with all the doctors the wife and I now see , I've got to be able get to the road and go .

    It's the over night storms that concern me a bit , wake up and see more snow than my tires can handle . Need some thing to get from my
    House to the pavement , about 200 ft. and then , I'm ok .

    So , what is a good brand , how much and how easy are they to install? Cable vs chain ? What advice you all got ?
     
  2. Mister Dave

    Mister Dave Well-Known Member

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  3. Oldoutlaw

    Oldoutlaw Well-Known Member Supporter

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    For deeper snows and any ice, stick with tire chains IF LEGAL in your State.

    Call Tractor Supply, Walmart, Home Depot, and Lowes. They can give you the price for your Tire size in your local area. Just tell them your tire size and what vehicle when you call them. I use tire chains when absolutely needed. Which nowadays is rare with our 4wd.
    Never had any decent results from those cable types. A pain in the butt if you get a good snowfall.
     
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  4. rockratt

    rockratt Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Back in the day we lived in a place that went down hill from the house to a hair pin turn then turned up hill. 4 wheel drive was almost unheard of in those days.We had to use chains to get up the hill if there was more than a couple inches of snow and I hated it. They were a pain to get on and a pain to keep on. And at some point they will either break or come loose and knock the paint off of a fender. There are other options these days but I have not tried them. I would think there has to be something that is easier to put and keep on.
    Doesn't snow much here anymore and everything has a transfer case.
     
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  5. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Dango,
    Yes be sure they are legal in your state? And some States have a certain period of time they can be used. Also be absolutely sure they are installed correctly. Otherwise they can work lose and tear a fender up or other parts on the truck or car.

    03
     
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  6. Oldoutlaw

    Oldoutlaw Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes, for surer. I always found that 3 of those thick black rubber bungie cords across the wheel to help hold chains tight worked wonders.
     
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  7. boatme98

    boatme98 Well-Known Member

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    Are studded tires legal there? The last time I needed snow tires I bought a set of studded ones, they worked as good as chains and are a whole easier. They are noisy though!
    It's easier if you buy an extra set of rims and mount them, then you can just jack jhe truck up and change the wheels when need to.
    If legal, the state will have definite times when they can be on and off. As, no studs after March 15 or something.
     
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  8. boatme98

    boatme98 Well-Known Member

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    Studs are legal in PA. from Nov 1 thru April 15.

    Check out:

    www.tirebuyer.com

    for info on studded tires.
     
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  9. Oldoutlaw

    Oldoutlaw Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The last time I needed snow tires I bought a set of studded ones, they worked as good as chains and are a whole easier. They are noisy though!
    It's easier if you buy an extra set of rims and mount them, then you can just jack jhe truck up and change the wheels when need to.
    If legal, the state will have definite times when they can be on and off. As, no studs after March 15 or something.[/QUOTE]
    Looks like legal in PA. But, they are only legal for the Winter months. But, a set of new tires once again and cost of studs and installation by a dealer is not cheap. Far, far more than a set of chains.
     
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  10. freefall

    freefall Well-Known Member

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    Studs don't so much in deep snow. Ask me how I know.
    Chains will chew through a lot of crap, but are a PITA to put on and off.
    How much does a snowblower cost in your neighborhood. You just got a fair load of cash dumped on you, buy a blower and don't worry about it no more.
     
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  11. boatme98

    boatme98 Well-Known Member

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    Yes but you don't have to lay in the snow & slush Everytime you need them.
    And there is no way to install chains without laying down. If you need chains on your mountain road, you get to town and the roads are plowed, you've got to take them off, then stop and and reinstall them on the side of the road when you get back to your rural road.
     
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  12. freefall

    freefall Well-Known Member

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    Believe me when I tell you that studs don't do much in deep snow. They work pretty good on ice.
    I have lived in AK for 40 years, and know a little bit about such stuff.
    Yes, chains are a pain in the fundament, but if you need them, they are all that will work.
     
  13. Oldoutlaw

    Oldoutlaw Well-Known Member Supporter

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    He posted that he only needed them for a mere 200 feet to get to the road. 200 feet from house to road. Then he said he would be OK.

    freefall has by far the best idea yet.
     
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  14. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    (c) Ice grips and tire studs.--Tires in which ice grips or tire studs of wear resisting material have been installed which provide resiliency upon contact with the road and which have projections not exceeding two thirty-seconds of an inch beyond the tread of the traction surface of the tire shall be permitted between November 1 of each year and April 15 of the following year.  The Governor may by executive order extend the time tires with ice grips or tire studs may be used when highway conditions are such that such tires would be a safety factor in traveling Commonwealth highways.  The use of tires with ice grips or tire studs contrary to the provisions of this subsection shall be unlawful.

    (d) Tire chains.--Tire chains may be temporarily used on vehicles during periods of snow and ice emergency if they are in conformance with regulations promulgated by the department.

    https://codes.findlaw.com/pa/title-75-pacsa-vehicles/pa-csa-sect-75-4525.html

    In short, yes, in specific cases, chains are legal on public roads here in PA. A snow emergency, as named above, but that's it.

    However, PUBLIC roads are not the issue, as posted by Dango, his 200 feet of driveway, and the snow ridge at the end of it, IS. So, they could be put on in his garage, not having to lay in the snow to do so, and a tarp and a moving blanket, would help with having to lay in the snow, once at the road. Perfectly legal, as he is on Private (his own) property.

    Something I know a bit about, having had 2WD trucks for years, in a state that doesn't allow chains at all. I had them, and only used them for moving things like my trailers in deep show, in the yard where they were parked, or if out in a shut down, and needing to get to my destination, or a safe place to stop for the night, while there. I figured any fine of ticket is cheaper than being stuck in a dangerous place, miles from help or safety. And I still have them, two sets, for the current trucks, even though they are both 4WD.

    Hell, the half ton of sand by the tailgate in my K2500 is enough that I can plow anything less than about 12 inches, in 2WD, with the right tires on the truck. Can, but usually don't, as it is easier, and places less strain on the drive line in 4 Hi or 4 Lo.

    As to where to get them, well, I've had my sets for over 20 years in one case, and about 7 in the other, and that set was bought at the Walmart in Anderson CA, right before I drove an RV back form there, in 2012.

    My first set came from the Sears Auto Care Center at the McKinnley Mall in orchard park NY, back in 1993, along with a set of 4 new tires for my '68 F 250 i had at the time.

    I googled it, using a 2005 Chevy C1500, and here are the results.

    https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1...&ved=0ahUKEwiGrLfw0pvmAhVOhq0KHb53C5gQ4dUDCAs

    Walmart seems like a good middle cost option, and between them and amazon, there are several to choose from.

    As to what i recommend, I have only used chains, standard cross (Straight) variety, and rubber tarp bungees to help secure them. The few times I have used them, they worked fine, just cut off the excess, or strap it down, to make sure it doesn't contact the fenders, or worse, brake lines.
     
  15. RJF22553

    RJF22553 Well-Known Member

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    Chains are a PITA to install. The only chains I have are for one of our tractors - usefull for getting out and clearing our 800-yard driveway. Uphill travel didn't work - even with 4WD on our tractor. Chains made the difference. But they seldom are worth the effort to put them on, IMHO. And installing chins on a tractor has GOT to be easier than on a truck...
     
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  16. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    A snow blower is out of the question for two reasons . My drive-way is not paved . It's dirt and gravel with an occasional short stump that would surely tear a snow blower up . Even in warm weather , I must be careful of those stumps . They don't stick up more than an in or two but it would break the shear pin for sure .

    Second reason . Priority is two keep warm and wisely invest that gift in to fuel , pellets and kerosene . Much more important to keep warm than looking at a snow blower .

    I'm looking at those snow socks . Found a pair under a $100 , just can't find much on durability ? If I have enough time to shovel , I will but it's that over-night storm with an 8:00AM doctor pending that needs thought !

    I'm delighted to have my truck running . After a new battery , starter , replaced two rear snow tires to pass inspection and my power steering unit , I have wheels ..........Weeee Haaaaaa.......!

    I have heat .......Weeeee Haaaaaa......! One day at a time and some of the biggest hearted people out there and prayers being answered , how can I fail ?

    Next year , I'll be older but healthier . Had some issues this year but that's over !

    One special thanks to the persons for the gift of heat , can't thank those people enough !
     
  17. donthav1

    donthav1 Well-Known Member

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    There are various types of "zip tie" snow chains that are easy to install, reusable, & above all else: cheap. Might be worth looking into those.
     
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  18. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Be sure your truck can handle chains. On quite a few of the Trucks you don’t have room to fit chains with out tearing up the wiring for the abs, and/or the brake lines.

    I run open lugged, studded tires on the work truck because it can’t be fitted with chains.

    On loose snow, open lugged truck tires work almost as well as chains, and once things get packed down, and icey, the studs work fine. The only time I miss chains is in the spring, when the roads have started to thaw, then the last cold snap hits. Which freezes the thaw into slick ice, and then it drops a couple of inches of fresh snow on top of the ice sheet.

    But, sometimes Not even chains help much in those situations.
     
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