Smith and Wesson Governor

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by mesinge2, Jan 22, 2011.

  1. mesinge2

    mesinge2 New Member

    1,530
    0
    0
    I can't believe Smith is making this. Aparently they called it the governor because the governor can tell the judge what to do.

    It can fire .45 ACP with moonclips, 45 Colt, and 2 1/2" 410 shells.

    View attachment 24061

    Click Image to Enlarge
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2011
  2. colmustard

    colmustard New Member

    1,237
    0
    0

  3. mesinge2

    mesinge2 New Member

    1,530
    0
    0
  4. colmustard

    colmustard New Member

    1,237
    0
    0
    Intresting, I would like to see how it works out for them. The price is not that bad for being a s&w. The function and reliability will most likely be much better then that of the taurus brand.
     
  5. mesinge2

    mesinge2 New Member

    1,530
    0
    0
    I am wondering how well would a 45 ACP work in such a long cylinder. I basically has to travel through 1.5" of an unrifled steel tube and then into 2.75" of rifiling.

    Would the rifiling have trouble after so much travel with no spin?
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2011
  6. utf59

    utf59 New Member

    676
    0
    0
    It also holds six rounds, compared to 5 in the Judge.
     
  7. dnthmn2004

    dnthmn2004 New Member

    3,287
    0
    0
    Thats cool and all, and I love S&W products, but I dislike how they play "catch up" with EVERYTHING.
     
  8. diggsbakes

    diggsbakes New Member

    1,680
    0
    0
    That is true as of lately, however in the big picture of handguns, Smith and Wesson has done MUCH MORE than their share of innovation throughout the last 150 years. Heck, most popular cartridges that we use in handguns were first developed by S&W. . .:)

    As for the gun in question. . . You'll probably never find one in my safe and it appears to be somewhat of a stab at Taurus for years and years of cheap knock offs.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2011
  9. HKSlinger

    HKSlinger Member

    730
    0
    16
    Imo,it looks better than the judge.
     
  10. HKSlinger

    HKSlinger Member

    730
    0
    16
    As for the gun in question. . . You'll probably never find one in my safe and it appears to be somewhat of a stab at Taurus for years and years of cheap knock offs.[/QUOTE]

    I guess Beretta's next?
     
  11. diggsbakes

    diggsbakes New Member

    1,680
    0
    0
    Maybe! :D

    I was kinda half joking, but I do imagine that the population in and`around the Smith and Wesson family, or any highly crafted production Co., doesn't forget much when it comes to another company competing against you with your own design. . . .

    Hmmmmm. . . . maybe I will get a "Governor" ;)
     
  12. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

    1,159
    0
    0
    I plan on getting one ASAP if I can find an FFL that will do a LE transfer.
     
  13. mesinge2

    mesinge2 New Member

    1,530
    0
    0
    Just for my understanding: The Judge/Governor is legal because it is a 45 cal revolver that is capable of firing a .410 shot shell.

    A 12 GA only with be a pistol grip Short barrel shotgun, right?



    Along those lines, if Smith & wesson invented a .72 or .73 caliber round for the 12 GA Governor could they market a new .72 or .73 cal revolver that just happens to be capable of firing 12 GA shells?


    ;)


    .
     
  14. dallascj

    dallascj New Member

    93
    0
    0
    How exactly does Taurus build knock-offs using tooling provided to them by the manufacturers in question? The S&W tooling came from them when they partnered with Taurus to begin manufacturing S&W's there, but later backed out of the deal. Same for Beretta.
    If I buy a GM plant and begin producing cars with the tooling I bought, are those cars knock-offs? They are built to the same standards as when GM built them.
     
  15. diggsbakes

    diggsbakes New Member

    1,680
    0
    0
    Yes, they are knock-offs. Same tooling doesn't = same product. Since there's about a thousand other factors that go into the manufacturing (material quality and skilled craftsman come to mind just a bit. :rolleyes:) of a specific product, there's no way they could ever be the same.

    I'm not saying that "knock-offs" are necessarily bad. Ruger pulled a historically mysterious move in the production of the .44 Magnum. Smith and Wesson (Elmer Keith) already had a prototype of the model 29 and had been developing cartridges of .44 magnum power/pressures for years (time-lines often conflict) before Bill Ruger had begun experimentation, yet Ruger managed to release the first .44 magnum pistol available to consumers.

    Was that a knock-off. Some say no, I say YES.

    You ever want some great reading check out "Sixguns" by Elmer Keith. Awesome history book. :)
     
  16. freefall

    freefall New Member

    2,325
    3
    0
    Obviously Ruger got some ammo from Remington to play with. Had to be to Remington's financial advantage to have more firearms to fire their new cartridge.