smith and wesson ctg

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by gatorgrads, May 26, 2008.

  1. gatorgrads

    gatorgrads New Member

    10
    0
    0
    i have a smith and wesson .38 CTG Serial # 1K98644 on the butt. My grandfather was law enforcment and left it. not sure wear he got it. Any idea of the worth? Wood handle blue steel. Three inch barell Seven round cylinder.
     
  2. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    Seven round cylinder? You might want to check again that should be a six round cylinder. Smith did not start producing 7 shot centerfire revolvers until the 90's (?).
    Judging by the serial number you have a K-frame revolver. Open the cylinder and look at the frame under the barrel. There should be a model number stamped there. Maybe a model 10? If there is no model number, how many side plate screws? Look under the barrel and above/ in front of the trigger guard. Smith's are normally grouped by the number of screws they have. Modern guns have 3 screws all in the side plate. Prior to that they had 4 screws, the three in the side plate and one in the front of the trigger guard. even earlier they had a 4th side plate screw on top near the hammer nose.

    Hence the designations of 3, 4 or 5 screw models.

    5 screw models are pre-WWII. 4 screws are up to about '61/'62.
     

  3. gatorgrads

    gatorgrads New Member

    10
    0
    0
    I will check on the cylinder and the rest and post the latest info when i get home tonight. Trying to get a basic value, i am going to keep it but want to get my guns insured
     
  4. gatorgrads

    gatorgrads New Member

    10
    0
    0
    Well I looked at it and it has only six rounds but it has only three screws but we serioulsy doubt it is pre WW2.

    Inside it had "MDL 16-3" on it?

    Does this help?


    Still trying to figure out what it is.
     
  5. gatorgrads

    gatorgrads New Member

    10
    0
    0
    ato read but actually i think uit says MDL 15-3!!!!
     
  6. ScottG

    ScottG New Member

    1,614
    0
    0
  7. gatorgrads

    gatorgrads New Member

    10
    0
    0
    Thanks, it is a 15-3. Good condition. I guess it really can only shoot 38 special not +p due to the age.

    Looking at others for sale they ae going for 200-250 or so does this sound about right.

    My grandfather worked for Florida Dept of Transportation. Maybe they issued it?
     
  8. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    15-3 should have been made between 1967 and 1977. Adjustable sights, huh? Personally I would shoot std pressure ammo but carry +P's. Steel frame will not suddely blow up if fired with a cylinder full of +P's. A steady diet will cause acellerated wear.
     
  9. Ruger Redhawk

    Ruger Redhawk New Member

    114
    0
    0
    Model 15 was called the Combat Masterpiece.I have a Model 67 which was the same model gun only made in Stainless Steel.Mine was made in 1972 and has S/S sights on it.Fine gun but like already mentioned I wouldn't get carried away shooting +P's in it.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2008
  10. onenut58

    onenut58 New Member

    238
    0
    0
    Model 15

    The model 15 is a strong gun and can shoot plus P all day long day in and day out. The plus p we have today is not as powerful as the regular loads when the model 15 was made.
    The plus p is a thing to cover the ammo manufacturers if some one buys some and stuffs it in a cheap gun. But any quality gun will handle plus P ammo.
     
  11. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    Of course one should follow the manufacturers recomendations on ammo. Metalurgy and heat treatment on this series of revolvers is better than the previous generation and not a good as the next generation. The knowledge of the maker evolves with time.

    To make a blanket statement tht you can shoot +P in your revolver, sight unseen is (IMHO) somewhat irresponsible.

    The main problem you will experience from a steady diet of +P ammo is a condition called "End Shake, Cylinder". This is caused by the peening and shortening of the crane (the part the cylinder spins on and that swings open to expose the cylinder for loading/unloading). Pre '77 cranes were prone to this. It is a condition that is fairly easily corrected and is much more slow to reappear after fixed with shims.
     
  12. WDB

    WDB New Member

    3,977
    3
    0
    Robo,
    When you have the time could you maybe start a new thread and explain End Shake, Cylinder in more detail. Something I have interest in and expect it could help several others. I'd ask here but don't want to hijack this thread.

    Thanks
     
  13. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
  14. onenut58

    onenut58 New Member

    238
    0
    0
  15. onenut58

    onenut58 New Member

    238
    0
    0
    end shake

    Here is a vidoe in you tube to show you how to fix endshake.It would probably take you about 30 years of shooting plusp ammo to need to do this but here is a video that shows how easy it is to fix it.

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmYzAVgDBkY]YouTube - Gunsmith - Fix excessive cylinder endshake in S&W revolver[/ame]
     
  16. WDB

    WDB New Member

    3,977
    3
    0
    Thanks, it would be much appreciated:)
     
  17. WDB

    WDB New Member

    3,977
    3
    0
    I have a 1955 45 made before it was given a model number and expect it has never had +P ammo shot though it. I know for the 15+ years I've owned the pistol it hasn't. All the same it has end shake and considering it's 54 years old I'm not surprised, overall it's a great pistol and truly want to correct this issue. The vid was pretty good but lacked the detail about the gap, it showed how to measure but didn't explain the measurement in relation to size of spacer required.
     
  18. onenut58

    onenut58 New Member

    238
    0
    0
    endshake

    Just use a automotive feeler gauge the flat style and it should be 5 to 6 thousanths of a inch between the forcing cone and the cylinder face and buy the apropriate shim(washer) to make up the difference.
    Its not a exspensive job and a good gun smith wouldnt charge a lot to do it if you dont feel comforatable doing it your self.
    You have a valuable smith and wesson. The 1955 target was a pre model 25. that used the two piece moon clips for the 45 acp. The newer one piece will work also or the autorims with out the clips.It came out the same year as the pre 29 44 magnum and is built on the same big N frame. It was a improvement of the old model 1950 that target shooters complained of being to light. The barrel was made heavier with a rib and it is a very acurate old five screw gun.I dont know if they came out with coke bottle grips like the pre 29 or not. But a set of cokes goes for about 300 bucks alone.
    Any pre model smith is a collectors item and yours wasnt made long before the model designations in 1957.Have you got a Roy Jinks letter on it yet? If your going to pass the gun down I would.
     
  19. WDB

    WDB New Member

    3,977
    3
    0
    I'm fine with doing the work myself. The pistol has value and it is truly fun to shoot, I use the full moon clips and they work great. I did get the history from S&W/Roy Jinks, it was only $30 and assisted in obtaining a fair value for insurance. My insurance company had valued it as a model 25.
     
  20. Andy1911

    Andy1911 New Member

    1
    0
    0
    Smith & Wesson Mod. 15-3

    I work in Public Safety and just bought a S&W ctg mod 15-3 from my Captain who is not into firearms. I got in in fair cond. with a 1000 rounds of 38sp in the box for 150.00!!!! Gawd I was just reading about how much it's worth and it's value as a gun. I took her shooting today and LOVE IT!!!!! She sits right next to my Glock 23 in the safe on TOP shelf!!

    What a great weapon!

    - Andy in Atlanta