Slugs from a unrifled barrel

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by 1911beast, Sep 16, 2012.

  1. 1911beast

    1911beast New Member

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    I have a single shot Rossi 20 gauge and I was wondering if I could shoot slugs or buckshot without harming the barrel. Someone told me it ruins the barrel but I want to know what you guys think.
     
  2. USEBOTHHANDS

    USEBOTHHANDS New Member

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    no, it does not. shoot till your hearts content. if steel shot, of all things doesn't hurt your steel barrel, then lead or copper MOST CERTAINLY will not, and DOES NOT.

    unless, that is, you have a damascus steel barrel. then, do not shoot steel. i do not know about slugs and buckshot in them.

    but i highly doubt your rossi is damascus steel.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2012

  3. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    What he said up there ^. For a smoothbore, use rifled slugs. Unless you have an Extra Full choke (usually found only on guns made for turkey hunters) you can shoot slugs or buck. Be sure to use shells no longer than the ones marked on your barrel, If it says 3 inch you can use 3 or 2 3/4, but if it says 2 3/4, do NOT try a 3 inch.
     
  4. tonydewar

    tonydewar New Member

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    a rossie should be good to go with slugs. if it has tubes use the most open one you have unless you have a rifled one. and a damascus barrel on a rossie? you got to be kidding me
     
  5. USEBOTHHANDS

    USEBOTHHANDS New Member

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    AND THAT'S WHY i wrote the last line...........:p
     
  6. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    Rifled shotgun barrels are a fairly "new" thing for shotguns. Slugs and buckshot are as old as shotguns themselves. So yes shoot what ever you want in your shotgun.
     
  7. Eturnsdale

    Eturnsdale New Member

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    I don't pretend to be the most knowledgeable about shotguns. I mean I have a few, and use them for bird hunting and on occasion deer. So please forgive the ignorant question that follows.

    Why would steel shot harm any type of shotgun barrel? I mean its encased in a plastic wad. Which is why, I assume, that you can fire tungsten shot with a steel barrel.
     
  8. kytowboater

    kytowboater Active Member

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    Shot can be harder than the barrel, not compress like lead, and may cause over pressure if I'm not mistaken. Correct me if I'm wrong please.
     
  9. WebleyFosbery38

    WebleyFosbery38 New Member

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    Yup, only negatives are distance and accuracy, not as good in a bird barrel.
     
  10. Eturnsdale

    Eturnsdale New Member

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    Ok. Im not saying that you're wrong. But that doesnt make sense to me.
     
  11. USEBOTHHANDS

    USEBOTHHANDS New Member

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    it's prolly a, "just in case" thing. bein as damascus steel barrels were made by combinin two bars of steel, heated and hammered, heated and hammered together then wrapped around a center rod to make the "barrel," there is/was a warning put out with steel shot when it first came out.

    even tho damascus barreled shotguns are still made today, the older guns were most likely (MAYBE) made with a lower grade steel than today's damascus shotties. even so, the barrels aren't a solid, and monolithic steel component.......the barrel is two, heated and hammered together. :)
     
  12. kytowboater

    kytowboater Active Member

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    If a barrel IS NOT designed for steel shot, it can and will wear them out with constant use. The steel shot is harder than the barrel, and must use higher velocities to have it preform the way it should, as it is lighter than steel shot gets wet and rusts in the hull, it can possible shoot like a slug, ring your barrel, or over pressure it when it doesn't compress and yea may go BOOM lol.

    That's about all I got lol.
     
  13. Eturnsdale

    Eturnsdale New Member

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    Higher velocites I get if using the same weight. But hardness of the barrel in direct relation to the shot itself? I am having a hard time wrapping my mind round it as there is essentially a cushion between the barrel and the shot.

    I guess it really doesnt matter. I don't own any guns with a damascus barrel. And likely wont. Its just more of a curiosity thing.
     
  14. USEBOTHHANDS

    USEBOTHHANDS New Member

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    dependin on your choke size, shot is compressed into a tighter lil "packet" before it exits the barrel. that is,.....with lead shot (or any malleable shot) it can deform and each individual pellet can "compress" against the next pellet. so, in all theory, lead shot can compress and distort as it forms to a barrel's diameter.

    steel shot, on the other hand, WILL NOT compress or deform. it is what it is. and you are right about the cup wadding......it is supposed to protect the barrel from such things. but when steel first came out, manufacturers warned about shootin them in damascus barrels. due in part to the hardness of the steel shot, but also due to the barrel bein what it was...........damascus. two steel rods hammered and folded, and forged and twisted together around a center "gauge" pole.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2012
  15. Virginian

    Virginian Active Member

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    If your choke is too tight and not made out of the right stuff, large steel or tungsten alloy shot can damage it. Saw a lot of that when steel first came along with older fixed choke shotgun barrels. Plastic shot cups have gotten better, but I wouldn't risk it.
     
  16. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Newer shotgun barrels that are "steel shot rated" are significantly harder than their lead shot predecessors. The protective cup (wad) cannot completely cushion and isolate the steel shot. The plastic wad is SIGNIFICANTLY softer than the shoot.

    If you are still doubtful, go ahead and do whatever makes sense to you. Just don't come crying to us when your shotgun (or your face) gets ruined by the excessinve pressures of steel shot loads.

    Back to the OP's question, Rifled slugs and buckshot will absolutely not harm a barrel unless you have a very tight choke (full, extra full or "turkey).
     
  17. The_Kid

    The_Kid New Member

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    Not necessarily.

    Brenneke USA Slugs FAQ
    Using the proper slugs, yes.
     
  18. Eturnsdale

    Eturnsdale New Member

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    Im not doubtful, just confused. Like I said Im not supper shotty girl here. Ive got three, one has never been fired and never will. A DU model 870 daddy won back in the seventies, a newer 870 and my lil 870 20 gauge youth model that Ive had since I was a kid.
     
  19. Old_Crow

    Old_Crow New Member

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    There is no need to fire shells loaded with steel shot other than for waterfowl hunting near wetlands. It is perfectly legal to use lead shot when pass shooting waterfowl on high ground. You still need a duck stamp no matter how you choose to bag your duck for the obligatory holiday turducken.
     
  20. Eturnsdale

    Eturnsdale New Member

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    That depends entirely on where you live. I would advise you against giving advise like that.

    In one state in which I lived even if you were hunting duck or goose from a field you were required to use steel shot. Any waterfowl required steel shot.