SKS Trigger Job

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by Popgun, Oct 4, 2013.

  1. Popgun

    Popgun New Member

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    I recently purchased a Norinco SKS in decent shape but with a bad creeping trigger pull. I've seen YouTube videos about how to shave down the sear in the trigger group assembly but the forward pin seems frozen in place. There's no visible rust and I've tapped it pretty hard with a brass mallet, still no movement. Any ideas about removing this pin without damaging the assembly?

    Thanks for any advice

    Also, what would be a fair price for a trigger job at a local GS if I decide not to do this myself?
     
  2. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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  3. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    bad_idea.jpg

    No, really, this is a REAL bad idea. While there are several gunsmithing jobs that are easily done by the non-pro, a trigger job is NOT one that would be high on my list for most guns.

    There are two likely outcomes- 1. You will get a gun that will not stay cocked, or is dangerous to handle, or 2. You get uncontrolled full auto fire.

    The SKS trigger is, by it's very nature, long and rather creepy. This is NOT a target rifle- it is a military carbine. Either learn to love it for what it is, or have a skilled riflesmith work on it.
     
  4. Popgun

    Popgun New Member

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    Thanks for the warning though I did end up shaving off a little of the sear. My original question was about a stubborn pin which I managed to remove with a little more effort and wasn't thinking I would get a warning back about safety. I guess what you are saying is that I could create a built-in "bump-fire" effect which I definitely wouldn't want. When I reassembled the sear into the trigger there still seems to still be a good amount of creep in the trigger though smoother since I polished the slide surface.

    I could just order a new sear from Murray's or do you think I could try it first in a non public area with two cartridges in the mag to see if there is a problem?

    Again, thanks for the warning.
     
  5. Popgun

    Popgun New Member

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    I dry-fire tested the safety, that works fine

    I dry-fire tested the receiver bolt with the trigger pulled to make sure it doesn't auto-fire, and it doesn't

    I dry-fire tested the firearm cocked by bumping the gun around in various ways to see if the trigger holds in the cocked position and it holds fine.

    The trigger has about 3/32" of creep measuring at the lowest point of the trigger and definitely has a clear audible "click" a ways back as the trigger is released.

    Is there any other dry-fire tests I can do?
     
  6. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

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    Trigger job to a SKS......??
     

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  7. Popgun

    Popgun New Member

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    OK, I guess I'm ordering a new sear. There's nothing that tops safety and I seeing a pattern in the feedback.

    Let me see if I get this right... NO Trigger Job on an SKS! Is that the message?

    All joking aside, thanks for the advice, I'm taking it.
     
  8. Josh1158

    Josh1158 New Member

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    No not bump fire like. It will dump the whole mag lol. Idk if you will be able to find a smith that will do a trigger job. I asked a few around me if I could do one or get a us made one and they looked at me like I was crazy. There a bunch of azzholes though.
     
  9. Popgun

    Popgun New Member

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    I'm ordering a new sear to be safe. All I'm going to do is make sure the new one's surfaces are smooth where the creep takes place and lube it well. From the remarks, I'm thinking that's the best I can do to have safety and a smooth trigger pull. I understand that it's not a target rifle, but I do like to have a smooth a trigger pull as is possible for all my guns.
     
  10. sigman84

    sigman84 New Member

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    I had s trigger job done on mine and we got it down to 4 1/4 lbs. Very smooth now too! Just because its a military carbine doesn't mean it shouldn't be made better. Don't know why people think it a waste of time with the SKS. I know mine will hold its own with just about any other carbine.
     
  11. dmbeck97

    dmbeck97 New Member

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    I had an SKS a few months back and had the same issue I just kept hitting the pin with a punch and eventually it came out. I did do a trigger job on mine and it was very easy and turned out great. As stated above if you have one slip up you could get a full auto gun that you can't control so be very careful. I just used a diamond infused sharpening stone that was the very smooth stone and on the other side was just the smooth stone I used the smooth stone to file out the grooves on the face of the sear that were left from machining and after that I used the very smooth side to polish the face of the sear. It turned out great, but be very careful if you do it yourself. Iraqveteran8888 has a video out on how to do it that I would suggest you watch.
     
  12. sgthooah04

    sgthooah04 New Member

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    If all you are going to do is polish the sear and I mean only polish. Then you should be ok. But if you reshape it, that's where you will run into trouble. Again if you aren't 110% sure about what your doing with a trigger job take it to a gunsmith. Also look into new springs from wolf. They sell kits for sks that are weaker for better trigger pull. I think the hammer springs are 39 lbs where in the kit they are 37 lbs. Dosnt sound like a lot but I hear a bunch of good stuff from people that have used them in their sks.
     
  13. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    DIY trigger jobs are usually a bad idea. If you round off a part just a little bit you create an unsafe gun. Gunsmiths use a variety of jigs and polishing tools to make certain each part they polish is shaped perfectly. Trigger jobs are usually less than $100 including parts.

    When you have a trigger job done don't expect to recover your money. If a DIY trigger job was done keep it to yourself. Most experienced gun buyers will not buy any gun with a trigger job unless the gun is cheap enough to replace the entire trigger assembly. Of course there are exceptions I am just stating rules of thumb.

    The pin holding the sear in place on a SKS is not meant to be beat out with a hammer. A press does the job much easier without risk of damaging the gun.

    Gunsmiths with a good reputation don't take jobs that are not in the customers best interest. I have seen gunsmiths do thousands of dollars of work to price point rifles. Today they are out of business. It's hard to create a good reputation by wasting your customers money.