single action

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by kafriedel, Dec 18, 2011.

  1. kafriedel

    kafriedel New Member

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    Has anyone had problems with the single action not working on a s&w. Double action pistol. It will engage when the hammer is preset.
     
  2. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    As it an older well used revolver? What model and did this happen while shooting. You could easy off the side plate and give it a cleaning and a few drops of breakfree clp and see if that helps. Or some parts warn down from dirt and dry conditions. But no never.
     

  3. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Some LE departments removed the single action ability from their revolvers.

    It was an attempt to dissuade the rank and file from creating a "hair-trigger" situation and make the firearms DAO.
     
  4. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    It was also fairly common to change to DAO when having the the hammer bobbed.
     
  5. kafriedel

    kafriedel New Member

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    Its a newer smith. I had it appart to duracoat the hammer and trigger. The problem is the spring inside the trigger wont cooperate. The spring is hitting a part to prevent the trigger from fully reseting.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    Boy that is one bone dry looking trigger group. Sure no dura coat build up were it should not be and did not cause in issues with parts bottoming out or roughness. Not a smooth looking insides at all. I will with a new revolver use wet/dry 1000 grit paper with some break free for lube on it and make a few pass's on all sides and wear areas just to besure they are smooth. Then lube. Might help .
     
  7. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    I have to admit that is the cleanest Smith I've seen in years. Others I have seen had some grease at contact points.

    Have you made sure that the paint is not hindering spring travel?
     
  8. kafriedel

    kafriedel New Member

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    Gents
    The problem was solved by cutting a very small section of the spring tip to prvent it from catching. I don't know what happened when i took it appart to duracoat the parts but the spring must have grown.
    Thanks for the advice.
     
  9. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    I would think that a "grown up":) spring would apply more force to resetting the trigger.

    I've started doing a bit of revolver smithing myself, on my own 65-2 and a local sheriff's deputy's 36. I would think that trigger return block (don't know if that's the correct name, the device that holds the trigger return spring) would have been what was holding it.

    In the future, I don't think it would be a good idea to do any coating on any internals.
     
  10. kafriedel

    kafriedel New Member

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    I agree coating the internals of a gun causes problems. I've done a few now and some have no problems others im still working on.
     
  11. AIKIJUTSU

    AIKIJUTSU New Member

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    I've had 2 double action revolvers (out of about 50 that I've owned) that had trouble in firing single action. One was a S&W model 57, a double action .41 magnum. I bought it used, and apparently the previous owner had done a DIY "action job" on it. If i cocked it I'd better keep it pointing at the target, or at least downrange, because if I breathed near the trigger or otherwise made any king of a motion, the hammer/sear engagement would slip and the hammer would fall. Just touching the trigger would set it off. I didn't keep that gun very long. The other trouble revolver was one of several Charter Arms Bulldog Pugs I had. They all were perfectly OK except for one. On it, occasionally the hammer would get stuck in the middle of its stroke when I tried to cock it. I had it worked over by a local gunsmith, and it was just fine after that. The 'smith said he removed a burr. If the action is too stiff you can get it lightened, but I don't know if a "hair trigger" situation can be remedied without buying new parts and getting them installed properly.
     
  12. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    No, the last I checked metal can only be removed, unless one uses a welder, in which case they would have to get the profile and shape perfect, and then there's a chance of breakage.

    I'm pretty sure that even the most professional gunsmiths replace internals instead if welding metal to them.....
    :)
     
  13. CubDriver451

    CubDriver451 New Member

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    Actually it depends on why the sear is not engaging the hammer correctly. As a previous poster described, some DIY "trigger jobs" are less than perfect. Sometimes this can be remedied by recutting the hammer hooks with a triangle stone. This is not something that an untrained person should attempt, as the geometry is critical to proper function.

    I cannot count how many times I have corrected this type of problem for customers that wanted to save money by doing their own trigger work. This tedious procedure is time consuming and expensive but generally cheaper than parts replacement on "pre-MIM" Smiths. I used to refer to this type of repair and associated cost as a "stupid tax". Unless you are very familiar with the internal workings and geometry of a particular gun, you are better off to pay a professional for proper modification of action components.

    JW