Single Action Army / US Artillery Colt 45

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by cortm9, Jul 15, 2011.

  1. cortm9

    cortm9 New Member

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    Years back my brother came home with a Single Action Army / US Artillery Colt 45 that he bought when on a trip out west. He bought it inoperable from a national park store where The Battle of Little Big Horn was fought. It came with (1) a filed down firing pin on the hammer and (2) a cemented plug where the barrel meets the cylinder.

    Is there anyway to make the gun operable without losing too many of the original parts. I would like to keep the same barrel and hammer if possible.

    Could I remove the the barrel and drill the cement out?

    Whatever insights you guys have is greatly appreciated.

    Here is a link to the same model gun:
    Antique Guns and Firearms including Antique Hand Guns - Antique Guns for Sale
     
  2. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I'm not certain, but it may be illegal to make it into a working firearm. We do not condone any form of illegal activity here.

    Someone with more knowledge will probably be along shortly to answer your question.
     

  3. Firearms4ever

    Firearms4ever New Member

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    It's illegal to do, and also very unsafe to do.
     
  4. cortm9

    cortm9 New Member

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    I should add, we both have valid firearms licenses. I'll have to look into the laws of altering firearms... Thanks for the response.
     
  5. Firearms4ever

    Firearms4ever New Member

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    From what my understanding is you can legally do it if you have a manufacturer's liscense or something like that, but even if you did it's unsafe because a lot of replicas use metals that can't withstand the preassures of a fired cartridge.
     
  6. cortm9

    cortm9 New Member

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    Sorry for the confusion, it is not a replica, but an actual gun recovered from the battle field, then sold with the alterations making it unable to fire. So barrel should be good to go if the plug was removed without damage.

    I'll look into people with a manufacturing license too, thanks.
     
  7. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    No legal reason you can't make it a gun again for yourself. Using the same hammer is possible by building it up with weld. The plug is metal? welded? best way might be to remove the barrel for better access to the plug. Drilling from the muzzle could cause damage to barrel. Where are your close-up detailed pictures. we all want to see it.
     
  8. cortm9

    cortm9 New Member

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    That's what I like to hear hiwall. Unfortunately I dont have the gun in my possession right now, and with the bar exam coming up in under 2 weeks, then heart surgery Aug 1, I don't see a picture coming anytime with in the next few weeks. I was hoping this could be a recovery activity while I'm inactive a few days after the surgery.

    Pictures will be coming, hopefully soon, but to answer your question in the meantime regarding the plug, I think it is welded now that you mention it. I never took the barrel off to get a clean look at it.

    Anyway, glad you all gave me somewhere to start, and I'll get back here when I have more.
     
  9. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    No offense, but why not buy an inexpensive replica to shoot & put this one on the wall to be admired?
     
  10. cortm9

    cortm9 New Member

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    why not do both? I know some people wont fire antiques, and I wouldnt fire it much either. I'd just like to return it to its original condition and be able to fire it safely if I wanted to.
     
  11. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    In my family we shoot all our antique guns. Those guns were made to shoot. Brother just bought a marlin model 1881 (made in 1882) 40-60 caliber. We will shoot it sat or sunday
     
  12. cortm9

    cortm9 New Member

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    [​IMG]

    Well, unfortunately for me I think Firearms4ever is right, it's replica. I had never studied its authenticity and presumed it was real based on the story I was told. But seeing this picture, without a patent date nor US stamp.. must be fake, right?

    Anyone know what the AKA 98 (or BKA 98?) means?

    Bummer
     
  13. Firearms4ever

    Firearms4ever New Member

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    Do you know how much was paid for it? I know that Colt Single Action Army's that are pre 1900's can tend to run from $2,000 up to the $10,000's. Does the firearm have a serial number on it?
     
  14. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    BKA 98 is the manufacturer. Where it was made I have no clue.
     
  15. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    Like Hawg said, it's the manufacturer. I have a replica 1851 colt navy with that same logo on it. The only way you can tell that mine is a replica is that the barrel has a small portion of it's rear end that is solid. (can only see by shining a light down the barrel) other than that, it works, looks, and acts exactly like the real thing. I've seen some for sale for as little as $20-$30 on gun auction sites (not roughed up to look like it had been dug up like yours) and are probably worth $100 to $150 new.

    Does your brother's have a rifled barrel or a smooth bored barrel?

    I'm not a hundred percent sure where they are made but a google search said they "may" be made in Czechoslovakia or Germany
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2011