Sighting in a scope

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by buckshop, Oct 18, 2011.

  1. buckshop

    buckshop New Member

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    Hat is the recommended yardage for sighting in a deer rifle?
     
  2. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    type of rifle, caliber, bullet type, type of scope, the terrain you would be hunting in, all of this can determine what yardage to sight your rifle in at. need more detail to be able to give a better answer.
     

  3. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    Make sure your on paper at 25 yards. If your more than 4" off the bull at 25 use you can loosen your scope rings and "mechanically" adjust and tighten everything back down to get closer. Once your happy at 25 back up to 100 for zeroing.

    Pay attention to the MOA, "minute of angle" on your scope. A 1/8 MOA scope will require 8 clicks to move your point of impact 1" at 100.

    Most scopes are 1/4 MOA...as in 4 clicks to move your POA 1" at 100.

    Good luck

    TACK
     
  4. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    100 yards. Here is a ballistics calculator that will help you adjust to any distance. You just reverse the clicks backwards to 100 when you are done.
    JBM - Calculations - Trajectory
     
  5. buckshop

    buckshop New Member

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    The rifle I'm going to sight in is a Marlin 444. I'll be shooting 250 grain Ammo. I'll mostly be hunting heavy wooded areas with 3 food plots (15 acre) each
     
  6. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Bore sight it then zero at 50 yds-
    Thats about the range you want to shoot that beast accurately :D
     
  7. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Ballistics are very similar to my 9.3x57. 100 yards should still be fairly easy especially w/ a scope. If he zeroes at 100 yards, he will be about +.5" at 50 yards and -3" at 150 yards.
     
  8. ninjatoth

    ninjatoth New Member

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    I used to have a 444,if you get it dead on at 25 yards you're still pretty much on at 100 yards-but I believe the standard for a 444 is 100 yards,you can do 150 but then you'de be high at 100,50 etc.
     
  9. tomingreeneco

    tomingreeneco New Member

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    I never liked a lever with scope on it. Just does not "look" right. I would forget the scope and sight it for 25 yards with being able to adjust to 50. Hunting deer in the woods of PA I have never taken a shot over 50 yards and have never needed a scope. Just by 2 cents worth, but you'll have more fun without the scope on that gun.
     
  10. lonewolf101

    lonewolf101 New Member

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    DITCH the scope and get peep sight or a ghost ring it make a lever gun look alot better!.
     
  11. jismail

    jismail Member

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    In terrain such as you describe, I would be concerned that the time on target with a scope will be to long and the game will duck into cover before the scope can be brought to bear, also, in heavy wooded areas, is the typical shot range going to warrant using a scope? Maybe open sights would be a better choice.
     
  12. dteed4094

    dteed4094 New Member

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    My go to deer rifle is a Remy 760. Where I hunt, a 100 yd shot is almost unheard of. It is scoped but on see thru mounts. I normally like to mount a scope as close to the barrel as possible as on all my other rifles but I find the scope very handy at times and much easier to take a quick look at something than binoculars. Points on a rack can disappear at a relatively short range. If you hunt in snow or rain, sometimes irons are your only option. Although in the event of a longer shot, a scope will reduce the chances of having to track a wounded animal or shooting a non legal deer. Hitting a deer at 100 yds with irons isn't a problem but sometimes knowing if it is a legal deer is.
     
  13. sniper762

    sniper762 New Member

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    from a decent shooter, time on target with a scope is no longer than irons