sight alignment and j-frame revolvers

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by KBlue, Jun 21, 2009.

  1. KBlue

    KBlue New Member

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    I went shooting with my buddy and his retired cop grandpa yesterday. when I shot with my smith model 60, my buddy's gramps said I was no where near having correct sight alignment. When I aim, the front sight is perfectly centered between the rear sight (vertically). but, the front sight is a little higher than the rear sight (horizontally). Shooting this way has always made sense to me since the rear sight on a j frame is practically nothing. I shot waaaaay worse when I had the front sight in both vertical and horizontal alignment. any advice? can anyone show me a picture of good sight alignment on a j frame? my confidence in my ability to shoot my smith has taken a serious hit over this.
     
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Basically the snubbies are intended for use with a 2 handed grip- one hand holds the revolver, other hand holds the shoulder of your target. :D

    Actual sight alignment STARTS with front blade centered in rear notch, and top of blade level with top of notch. However, for any significant distance, you will need to start raising the front as seen in sight picture- since these are not especially flat shooting guns (assuming 2 inch bbl)

    Frankly, these are not target type handguns that I would use at 50-60 yds. With a sight radius THAT short, sight alignment will be off greatly before it becomes apparent.

    Next question- what is your AIM point on the target? 6 oclock, center, 12 oclock, etc. A 6 oclock hold with a high front sight would put you about on target at a given distance. A CENTER hold with a high front sight will put you way high at close range.
     

  3. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    C3 is correct.

    I have a S&W model 37 and my wife has a model 60. They are what I call Doctors' guns. Eyes, ears, nose and throat. ;)
     
  4. TexasCHL

    TexasCHL New Member

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    I agree with C3Shooter in regards to how your sight window should be aligned. Also keep in mind that a snubby is going to be a "Get Off Of Me" type gun and isn't going to be nearly as accurate as a full size handgun. Here is a picture of what your sight window should look like:

    [​IMG]
     
  5. KBlue

    KBlue New Member

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    thanks for the feedback guys. I definitely don't plan on needing my smith for anything other than immediate, close quarters self defense as you mentioned. Since i'll never know what distance i'll need it at in case SHTF; ill double my nightly snap cap session until I get consistent alignment with smooth trigger pull. If i'm going to do something, i have to do it right.
     
  6. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    When my wife practices at the range, she only shoots double action. She figures that if she ever has to use it, that's how it will be. Too fast to cock it, just point and click.

    My wife is not much of a gun person, be she has a great deal of common sense. ;)
     
  7. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    My wife does the same thing and I wouldn't want to break into her house!
     
  8. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Sounds like our wimmins is pretty smart. ;)
     
  9. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    Mine is smarter then mo. She graduated top of her class with all kinds of distinctions. She not to shabby with her Ruger either, he'll hold a 3-4" group at 10 yards. Like I said, I wouldn't want to break into her house!
     
  10. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    Bear in mind they are fixed sights, and your ammunition will vary the point of impact as well.

    If your gun is sighted for the 110~125 gr. JHP loads, the 158 gr will print much higher. Also, your sight picture as I understand it, with the front sight high, will print higher as well.

    Light revolvers are more sensitive to change in bullet weights.

    Bob Wright