SHTF basics, questions and advice needed

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by roosterjuicer, Mar 4, 2009.

  1. roosterjuicer

    roosterjuicer New Member

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    When I first joined this site and blundered my way onto this particular part of the forum, to be quite candid, i thought ya'll were a little crazy. However, upon further review you do have a point.

    I think in a disaster situation (hurricane Katrina for example), where the normal keepers of society cant or wont do their jobs, utilities are non existant, resources are scarce, and the crack runs out and people get irritable, you have to be prepared. So i just wanted to say, I am on board. So now its time to get prepared.

    I am pretty well prepared defense-wise. I have a lot of shotguns, and a lot of bullets for the shotguns, although mostly hunting ammunition. I have a great hunting dog, so i think if i can get out of town, I can live off pheasants :). I also have a few pistols and plenty of ammo. I also have an AR-15 and about 500 rounds for it. I have a red dot sight on there, but i have iron sights too. I also have a german shepherd for home defense.

    My questions come up with non-defense needs. and when I cant get out of town. here's what Ive thought of already.

    Water- (how many gallons is a good number?)
    Water purification-(what are some good companies to look at?)
    Food-MRE, canned goods (any other ideas?)
    Sleeping bags, blankets, clothes, socks
    tent
    small propane stove-(how many bottles, any brands?)
    an axe or hatchet
    an assortment of other tools-(reccomendations for must haves)

    what else should I have?

    what about keeping the dogs alive? or does the cost of the dogs outweigh the benefit of the dogs?
     
  2. Shotgun Shooter

    Shotgun Shooter New Member

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    I'm no expert on survival and the such. But I just had to touch on the dog thing.

    A dog devotes their life to be with you. I wouldn't go anywhere without my dog in a SHTF situation. Hes been with me since I was 4. I am now 18. So, I personally would sacrifice a few things in order to get dog food.

    How big of water drums can you get ahold of?
    If you're not limited to space, you can use those hawaiian punch 1 gallon bottles. I've got 3 in my room and each of them cost 1.97.

    S.S.
     

  3. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

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    You can run a small DC electric pump through a charcoal house filtration system off of either solar, wind, vehicle or human power into five gallon poly containers. Treatment for micro-bugs can come later. Dry clothing (food savers work great for this), shelter, sleep sacks for your bags, good knives and axes, a couple of solar panels or an automotive alternator that can be used to build a water or wind electrical system and a couple of batteries are a must. Have MRE's on hand in the event you have to bug out on foot, canned food if you can get out by vehicle. Weapons that you have plentiful ammunition for or your favorite .22 if you're on foot. By all means take the dog, if worse comes to worse; well have you ever seen the movie 'Little Big Man'?
     
  4. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Solar Powered Battery Charger VW/Audi & Other Makes - eBay (item 220371966526 end time Mar-08-09 12:53:34 PDT)

    I've been toying with the idea of picking up a couple of these for alternative electricity, but they don't put out much juice. They are darn cheap though designed to keep a 12v charged; when the fuel runs out, there should be plenty of car batteries around to run radios, lights, or water pumps. I have wondered, for peeps in really rural areas, if the plastic barrels from car washes could be cleaned for water storage.

    Having heard the Katrina stories from all of my relatives in MS, it seems worth a bit of preparedness. They all have generators now.
     
  5. sgtdeath66

    sgtdeath66 New Member

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    well to start, water how much is enough- depends how many people
    purification- dont know about that
    you got the food thing figured but i would say go with mre's therefore you wont need a can opener
    sleeping bags- depends on your climate if it gets cold then a nice -30 bag is wise to keep on hand, clothes arent that important to bring cuz you can wash your clothes when you bath in a creek or pond. but socks are a must, you need to keep your feet clean and dry to avoid "jungle rot" which could kill you in one form or another
    dont know about propane cookers, my thought is keep matches and a magnesium striker. fires will keep your moral up higher than a mini stove will and provide heat.
    i would go with a hatchet, maybe one with a saw in the handle. i think gerber make one. and always always bring a pocket knife and a fixed blade atleast 6 inches long.
    as for the dog dont bring alot of food for him, just enough to feed him for a day, what ever you kill he can have as well. also a few high calorie bars wouldnt hurt either:cool:
     
  6. bkt

    bkt New Member

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    Between 1 and 3 gallons per day per person, depending on where you live and what level of activity.

    Berkey is good. Water purification tablets are a must. Boiling water will do in a pinch.

    Split peas, lentils, beans and rice store easily and keep for a very long time. Flour, sugar, oil/lard.

    If you want ideas on surviving outside the home, do a search for "survival kit" on this forum.

    As many as you like/can carry.

    An axe AND a hatchet AND a folding camp saw. Firewood comes in handy when your propane bottles run out.

    Rope, knives, compass, maps...the list goes on. Do that search for "survival kit" and you'll see plenty of ideas contributed by many folks here.

    Dogs are outstanding alarm systems and deterrents. Keep your dog around. They can eat all sorts of things, including those parts of animals you hunt that you'd maybe rather not eat.
     
  7. roosterjuicer

    roosterjuicer New Member

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    great post bkt very helpful, thanks a lot
     
  8. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Don't forget a basic First Aid kit. Keep regular plain ol' bleach on hand for water purification as well. Rotate it out though, because it has a finite shelf life. Make sure you have any meds that you may need for you & yours and your dog too.

    Make sure you have personal hygiene items as well. Toothbrush, toothpaste, soap and razors at minimum. You'll feel better if you keep up your hygiene.

    I'd suggest you do some internet surfing. You'll find more lists and information than you'll be able to stand. Once you have the information you can better decide what you need and what is important to you.

    I will withhold comment about abandoning your dog.
     
  9. roosterjuicer

    roosterjuicer New Member

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    let me make it clear that I dont want to abandon my dogs...i like them more than my fiance sometimes:D

    however, if things get really bad, when every pound you are lugging along and every ounce of food and calorie consumed is extremely important, its an important issue to determine.
     
  10. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    That's a horse of a different color. ;)
     
  11. chopkick

    chopkick New Member

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    Don't you under any circumstances voluntarily abandon or sacrifice those dogs. They are loyal companions and will not fail you.
     
  12. Cnynrat

    Cnynrat New Member

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    On another forum I frequent (non-firearm related) I found a link to a source of some SHTF advice based on the experiences of someone who has lived, and survived, through a SHTF situation. I recommend anyone interested in advice on SHTF preparation based on a real world scenario take a look at this link: Real Life SHTF Advice (excerpt below). It's the story of a guy who lived through some hard times in Argentina during a time when their society was in collapse. Very interesting reading.

     
  13. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    ^^^^^
    That was a great read! It reminded me of the Katrina stories & a panicy telephone call i got asking how much fuel i could get to my family in south MS (luckily we found a better way). My parents still keep a number of those 5 gallon jugs of water & have a 55 gallon drum for gas. IIRC, they dug out my old snubby .38 during that period. If that seems silly, a brother shot his sister over gasoline about 30 minutes away from the 'rents town.

    All of the talk about dogs' value reminds me that though my cats won't help me a bit, they are very self sufficient little hunters.
     
  14. Recon 173

    Recon 173 New Member

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    One thing I suggest is that a new prepper take some classes from FEMA or the American Red Cross. Just about every government agency urges its own staff to prepare for disasters and emergencies in various ways. So, as a result of this knowledge, I started taking disaster survival classes from FEMA and the Red Cross.

    Most groups urge you to have about a 30 day amount of food and medicines on hand and always ready. The idea is that most groups that urge preparation feel that eventually, within a couple of weeks, disaster response services will arrive with food and items for the area struck by the disaster. In other words, most agencies see disasters as a short-term issue rather than one that goes on for a really period of time like 6 months or more. To date, most of them have been correct BUT I always plan ahead for a longer disaster/problem just to be safe. It doesn't hurt to be ready, just in case.

    FEMA: Plan Ahead

    Preparing and Getting Trained

    As for water, I keep a small amount of bottled water around the home but I also plan to boil water or filter it over a long term amount of time. I don't think that one can realistically store enough water for all their needs so I plan on tapping into local reservoirs, streams and/or ponds as I need for longer events involving survival. So bleach, fire and purification tablets are all in my inventory for cleaning water.
     
  15. Angrypoonani

    Angrypoonani New Member

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    Most people know about canned goods and water... that all seems pretty obvious to everyone - I hope. Then if S#!T really hits the fan and you're left clinging to your guns, I'd suggest stock up on some cleaning supplies for your better half (AKA your gun) so that if there is some major shtuff going down you can always keep your baby clean and running smoothly.

    One thing is for sure, I wouldn't want to be traveling through a dangerous area with faulty prone equipment. Yes of course you want to have reliable equipment at your disposal in the first place but I'm talking long term. Given a long enough span of time reliability of equipment decreases exponentially if unkept.

    For me I'd rather have the most reliable equipment possible when having to huff it on my own without electricity, running water, supermarkets, etc. But what keeps something reliable? Upkeep! Think about this aspect of SHTF scenarios as well.