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Thanks!

Here is one I finished last month for Halloween, a Zombie hunter 10/22. I started with a factory beech wood stock, carved in the biohazard sign and Zombie Hunter text, then filled the recesses with glow in the dark paint, covered with clear epoxy. Then I stained the stock neon green and added some accessories included a red dot sight and a bayonet









and one with the lights on, then turned off



Blog posts

https://tincanbandit.blogspot.com/2020/04/1022-zombie-hunter-part-1.html

https://tincanbandit.blogspot.com/2020/10/1022-zombie-hunter-part-2.html

https://tincanbandit.blogspot.com/2020/04/1022-zombie-hunter-part-2.html
 

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Doc Neely, that is beautiful.

Mosin Nagant, just didn't like the red color. for the hardcore purists- I'm sorry. Picture sucks, but it's colonial walnut stained. I don't even know what kind of wood it is, I know there were several types used.
One of my Mustangs

I got this little guy plain jane with a few handling marks and sent it to Jim Downing who engraved the slide and reblued it after. I then added the sambar grips. One of my favorites to carry.

Here's before and after pics.





I did the same thing with my nickled Mustang II but it got MOP grips.

That is gorgeous.
 

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There is a lot of very nice, professional work in this thread, producing some very attractive firearms.

I don't refinish guns. If it was too ugly to begin with, I leave it in the store. A refinish, on a nice gun, generally lowers the value and the pieces are as much investment to me as hobby. I may replace sights on working guns, or replace grip panels, but those are the kinds of things that can be undone.

Yesterday, my son and I were shooting and he brought out his Smith and Wesson model 1917. The gun had a really nice bright blue refinish and all I could think was, "what a shame."
 

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There is a lot of very nice, professional work in this thread, producing some very attractive firearms.

I don't refinish guns. If it was too ugly to begin with, I leave it in the store. A refinish, on a nice gun, generally lowers the value and the pieces are as much investment to me as hobby. I may replace sights on working guns, or replace grip panels, but those are the kinds of things that can be undone.

Yesterday, my son and I were shooting and he brought out his Smith and Wesson model 1917. The gun had a really nice bright blue refinish and all I could think was, "what a shame."

I hear that a lot and people forget that rusty beat up guns do not command high prices, so refinishing them is not diminishing any value. You even admit that if a gun is "ugly" you leave it in the store....as do most collectors, therefor there value is not what people think it is.
I agree that a military surplus rifle that is original should be left with its patina, same for an old gun that has a famous or family history to it . But a blanket statement that refinishing guns ruins their value is incorrect. A gun that has been refinished correctly is worth more than what it was when it was rusty.
 

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I hear that a lot and people forget that rusty beat up guns do not command high prices, so refinishing them is not diminishing any value. You even admit that if a gun is "ugly" you leave it in the store....as do most collectors, therefor there value is not what people think it is.
I agree that a military surplus rifle that is original should be left with its patina, same for an old gun that has a famous or family history to it . But a blanket statement that refinishing guns ruins their value is incorrect. A gun that has been refinished correctly is worth more than what it was when it was rusty.
That is a matter of personal perspective. There is no right or wrong answer.

If a firearm is collectible, it detracts from the value to refinish it; many times by 50% or more.

If a firearm is not collectible, unless it has a personal attachment, many times it is best to just knock down the rust, oil it up and shoot it. Of course, if someone wants to plow money into a gun to refinish it, it is their option. Some people need pretty guns; I get that.

When I make a firearm transaction, I always have resale value in mind. I don't always get that right, and I have paid too much for some, but overall, I have done well.

Back when Mosins were selling for under a hundred bucks, I bought a bunch of them, and so did a lot of other folks. People who "Improved", refinished, chopped stocks, drilled and tapped still have guns that are a hundred bucks or so. Those of us that left the flaking finish had the values triple or in some cased quadruple.
 

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My latest project: I took a $50 Marlin model 60 and created the "Super Deluxe Edition"

Rifle: 1988 vintage Model 60 with 18 round magazine and 22" barrel
Magazine: Brass 18 round magazine from "Golden 50 model"
Stock: Walnut thumbhole stock from Boyd's, fitted with factory Marlin butt plate
Trigger/Trigger Guard: Aluminum anodized from DIP
Upgrades:
MCARBO trigger spring kit
New factory feed throat, recoil spring and buffer
newer Polished & jeweled bolt
newer stainless charging handle
Williams Fire Sights (fiber optic)
High polish blued barrel
Cerakoted receiver in graphite black

Now the pictures














and the blog posts with all the detail and pictures

TINCANBANDIT's Gunsmithing: The Marlin Model 60 Super Deluxe Project Part 1

TINCANBANDIT's Gunsmithing: The Marlin Model 60 Super Deluxe Project Part 2

TINCANBANDIT's Gunsmithing: The Marlin Model 60 Super Deluxe Project Part 3

TINCANBANDIT's Gunsmithing: The Marlin Model 60 Super Deluxe Project Part 4

TINCANBANDIT's Gunsmithing: The Marlin Model 60 Super Deluxe Project Part 5
 
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