shotguns basics...help

Discussion in 'Hunting Forum' started by icallshotgun88, Jan 22, 2014.

  1. icallshotgun88

    icallshotgun88 New Member

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    hey ya'll...

    id consider myself a firearms enthusiast who does target shooting on the weekends, but I'm going to start duck hunting and need some help picking a good shotgun...

    problem is, all the guns i own are for target/precision shooting, so i dont know the first thing about picking a good duck gun...

    im hoping to get some questions answered...

    1. which action do you recommend? semi, pump or break? WHY?

    2. wood or synthetic? WHY?

    3. what barrel length do you recommend?

    4. which sort of choke do you recommend?

    5. I have about a $1000 for a hunting shotgun...what are 3 specific guns you recommend and why?

    thank ya'll SO much for any responses
     
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    BOY! You just opened the 55 gallon DRUM of worms!!!

    My thoughts- semi auto. Synthetic (as much as I love walnut, think about where ducks are found) I am partial to longer barrels, 28-30, YMMV. Chokes? modified/ full. Important part- rated for STEEL shot. Can't use lead with waterfowl.

    Second choice? Pump. CAN you use an O/U? Sure- but better for upland birds.

    Brand? HAH! Not going there!!! But you can get a decent duck gun for well under a grand.
     

  3. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    There are several good shotguns for Waterfowl in my opinion.

    From the bottom to top is the Mossberg Model 935 Mag. Waterfowl Realtree Nothing at all wrong with the Mossberg. I have a Model 930 Turkey Gun and I love the gun! Mounted an EOTech on it and it is the Berrys for Turkey hunting and a nice gun. You might take a look at one! Some people turn their noses up to that but probably have never owned one! It and the 935 well under $1000.
    Next the Bennelli Performance Shop SBE II Waterfowl
    Next the Remington Versa Waterfowl but it is slightly above your $1000.00 limit
    All the above are Semi Autos which I prefer Duck Hunting. But nothing wrong with the pump. Used an Remington 870 for years.
    The Remington Model 887 Waterfowl is a nice gun also but it is a pump!
    Most all of these have interchanable chokes. And normally you will need a 30" barrel and full choke or waterfowl choke for Ducks. As you probably assumed being a competition shooter. The stock realy doesn't matter to me. Although you can beat up a nice wood stock pretty well over a season and the synthetics are probably better due to the water and climate exposure. Personal opinion I am not one for over and unders for duck hunting. For Skeet,Trap, Quail and Pheasants I like the O/U Doubles.
    Hope this gives you a couple to take a look at! The Remington Versa Mag. Waterfowl is the only one about 2-$300 over your target but a nice gun.

    03
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2014
  4. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Given the gun is going to get beat up in cold weather I would get Mossberg 500 with a beech stock. The reason I selected beech is synthetic stocks do make an unnatural noise when they bump into something. You are going to be in a blind...You will bump the gun into the blind.

    Don't worry about scratches on a beech stock. Old English scratch remover will keep a beech stock on a Mossberg 500 looking like new. In fact, I recommend giving it a coat of Old English before you even shoot the gun.

    The Mossberg 500 has it's place in the most reliable gun ever debate. The most reliable gun ever debate is soon to start. By nature pump shotguns are very reliable. The Mossberg 500 is the only shotgun to pass a military trial.

    Nevermind the wiggle in the forearm. The forearm is riveted so it will not bind up. I have fired a Mossberg 500 with the receiver stuffed full of snow (not intentionally), it functioned perfectly. After 100 rounds you should not have have to pull back on the forearm, recoil should push the slide back.

    A Mossberg 500 with a 28" vent rib barrel will include a full set of chokes. The 500 is one of the few shotguns with two extractors.

    I can go on and on why a Mossberg 500 is the best shotgun ever made.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mossberg_500
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2014
  5. big_blue79

    big_blue79 New Member

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    My 500 was very smooth cycling, smoother than all the 870 Express's I cycled, but I liked my Winchester 1300 Field better, I don't know what it was, but that Shotgun just seemed built better and cycled better. Was a little quieter cycling as well, my 500 you knew when it was racked. It was a USA made 1300.
     
  6. icallshotgun88

    icallshotgun88 New Member

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    3" or 3&1/2"?

    Is it true that 3&1/2 is better because it offers more shot with a longer range?

    And is that ideal or needed for duck?
     
  7. SRK97

    SRK97 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They tend to have more shot or the same amount of shot at a higher velocity. It is an advantage bit for some people the recoil Is to much. The only reason I don't shoot 3.5 inch buckshot out of my 870 is because I can't justify paying 2x the price for just 3 more pellets of 00 buck.
     
  8. RaySendero

    RaySendero Member

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    Duck Hunting

    I've used a 3" Remington 11-87 with steel shot for over 25 yrs.

    Use #4s for teal over decoys.

    Use #2s for bigger ducks over decoys.

    Use #1s for past shooting.

    Prefer a IC choke over decoys and a M choke past shooting.
     
  9. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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  10. Missouribound

    Missouribound Active Member

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    The best answer by far was by c3shooter.
    If you are going to get heavily involved in this sport, I would think that you don't spend all your money on your first gun. The Mossberg 500 is more than adequate for a hunting gun. Let your experience grow and maybe you will move to an auto, and someday a dbl. (SXS or OU) I started with one shotgun...now I have three...I started with one revolver....now I have 3...I started with one auto...now I have 6..... You get the picture, right?
     
  11. icallshotgun88

    icallshotgun88 New Member

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    im not saying i wont buy more hunting shotguns down the road, but whats wrong with buying a REALLY nice shotgun as your first hunting shotgun?

    i DO plan on having it for yearsssssss...

    besides, i do have a shotgun already, just not a hunting shotgun. and i have multiple rifles and multiple handguns...why not buy a really nice hunting shotgun as my first hunting shotgun?

    i dont see anything wrong with it...
     
  12. big_blue79

    big_blue79 New Member

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    Would you feel more pissed of if you broke the forend of that $500 or $600 Wood Stocked Browning or Remington or the forend of the $200-$300 Wood Stocked Mossberg 500?

    Not trying to sway you but I'd be bummed.
     
  13. Missouribound

    Missouribound Active Member

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  14. od green

    od green New Member

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    What I haven't seen mentioned yet is fit. You sound like your experienced shooter but waterfowl is a whole diffrent game and with improper fit it dosen't matter from low budget to high end if it don't fit you won't hit. shoulder all you can get your hands on and you will know when it just feels right, also don't forget to take at least the top half of your hunting gear with you. Something might feel sweet to shoulder with a tee shirt but will be way too long when you wear waders and coat.
     
  15. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    It depends on the type of hunting you do. I mostly pass shoot ducks and geese. I just take the bushing out of the powder/shot bar so it will dump as much shot as possible. When I jump shoot ducks I just use 1 1/4 oz of shot. The recoil from a full house load in a canoe is too much. Most duck hunters like full house loads. Not many duck hunters are quick enough to jump shoot ducks. they should be called I don't practice anymore because I got a benelli.

    Navigable rivers and streams cannot be posted. They are free hunting for anyone unless the state restricts hunting on the given stream. The smaller the stream the better the hunting. Most people like to use a gas motor. If the stream is to small to launch a boat from a trailer maybe two people in the entire county hunt it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2014
  16. nchunt101

    nchunt101 New Member

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    I fail to see how having a Benelli slows you down when jump shooting. I seem to do better than most. And keep in mind it is trespassing once you get out of your canoe to go around blowdowns that often fall across those little creeks.
     
  17. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I totally agree that a Benelli does not slow a shooter down. But most duck hunters do not practice. I never find a duck hunting partner at a skeet range. I find my duck hunting partners in the summer fishing in the same streams I hunt.

    I regards to the blow downs I own a nice chainsaw. I only have to cut a few limbs off a blow down to pass under it. Only for a few years after Fran I was hampered from hunting small streams. During that time there were so many trees down it was hard to walk through the woods, much less paddle down a river. There is no law that says I can not limb any tree that prevents me from navigating a river. Only cypress trees are protected by state and federal law. Cypress trees are not an issue on small streams.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2014