Shotgun kickback... damn!

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by Wheelspin, May 17, 2010.

  1. Wheelspin

    Wheelspin New Member

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    I had the chance to fire off a few rounds in a friends Maverick 88 12g shotgun at the weekend and was surprised at just how much kickback a shotgun has. I was expecting to feel it but not for my shoulder to still be sore 2 days later. I guess my question is is that normal? I just a ***** :p or is there a difference between them all?

    Do more expensive shotguns have a recoil buffer system?

    I was planning on getting one the same myself as a home defense weapon but now I'm in two minds. I know my wife could never handle one, she's 5'2" and on the dainty side. Plus I'm sure if I took her to the range and fired it for herself she'd never touch the thing again after the first shot.

    It was the standard 18.5" barrel with synthetic stock, would a collapsible stock with their rubber but pads soften the kick much?

    I also tried firing a few holding it to at my side and found I was pretty accurate so would I be better off getting one with a pistol grip and firing it that way?

    We used a mix of Federal 2 3/4 shells in both buckshot and slug. Are some shells softer kicking than others, while still an effective defense round?

    Alot of questions I know but when it comes to shotguns I know very little so any help or advice would be appreciated.

    Thanks, Andy
     
  2. Missileman

    Missileman New Member

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    12 gauge pumps are definitely hard recoilers--especially with short barrels, synthetic stocks, etc. which make them lighter. There's not much you can do other than install a good recoil pad (there's probably already one on there) and perhaps port the barrel--but I've found porting to have a minimum impact, especially on short barreled shotguns. If you want to lower the recoil, you'll need to go to a gas-operated semi-auto, like a Remington 1100. A Remington 1100 in 20 gauge is a great woman's shotgun, but for defense they aren't quite as reliable because of the action--however, I've shot tens of thousands of round through my 1100s and when properly maintained they are rock solid reliable. As always, just have her practice with it--skeet is a great training aid for shotgun shooting and she may get hooked on it!
     

  3. .22hustler

    .22hustler New Member

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    Buckshot and slugs will have a greater kick than your low-brass shells. Get a little heavier gun. Also, length of pull will have an effect on recoil.The absolute worst gun to shoot, and I don't know why people buy them for their first gun, are the single shots. You want recoil??? Try one of those. Shoot a single shot with a 3" magnum load if you want to hurt for awhile. I had a 16 ga bolt action as my first gun, and WANTED more kick, so I went to a 12.
     
  4. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    I have found that if my body absorbs the recoil vs shoulder alone, I have not had too much of a problem. Being right handed, I have left knee bent a little, right leg back in line with shoulder and right heel off the ground. It worked for me when I was shooting NSSA skeet and ATA trap.
     
  5. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    .22Hustler has it right. If the gun fits you you wont notice the recoil nearly as much. A synthetic stock is going to kick more than wood. My daughter was routinely pulling both triggers on a SXS 12 gauge with no recoil pad when she was 13 but she wouldn't touch my 20 gauge.
     
  6. .22hustler

    .22hustler New Member

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    Now THERE'S a tough kid,lol...She sounds like a girl most of us wish we had..Best of luck to her...:D
     
  7. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    A common error with shotguns- being leery of kick, shooter holds gun lightly- and gets the crap stomped out of himself. Tighter the fit to shoulder, less impact (more push than WHACK). Sitting position is painful- standing, body moves.

    I dove hunt with SxSs and pump guns, go thru a box of shells a day, or 2-3 boxes on the trap range- and in the spirit of brotherhood, will withold comments about wussiness.

    But in your heart, you know!:p
     
  8. falseharmonix

    falseharmonix New Member

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    Wheelspin:

    I would suggest looking into the Blackhawk stocks with Knoxx recoil suppression. I have one on my Mossberg 590, and the recoil difference between the original solid stock and the Knoxx is night and day. Yes, its still going to kick with buckshot and slugs, but it is much more manageable.

    I use my 590 as my HD firearm.
     
  9. Wheelspin

    Wheelspin New Member

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    Thanks for the replies, I was wondering if the loads we were shooting and the design of the stock were the cause of the recoil being stronger than I was expecting. I'll have the chance to fire a few off in the same shotgun next weekend so I'll try a different stance and shoulder placement, maybe some different shells too.

    Thanks for the link to that Blackhawk stock too Falseharmonix, I was hoping there would be something like that plus being able to shorten the pull would be a big help for my wife. Who knows, maybe she may enjoy this one :)
     
  10. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Your wife might find the same shotgun in 20 guage to be more easy to handle. I must agree with the perceived sentiment above that the stock must be properly seated in the shoulder (preferably with some "give" in the legs/stance) to reduce kick to a manageable level.
     
  11. UnderFire

    UnderFire New Member

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    I love 12ga. shotguns...they are my favorite firearm. I believe the more you shoot them the more you'll get use to them. You'll start to figure out what stance and hold works best for you. Maybe start out with 2 3/4" #8 or #9 loads and work up from there. I remember when my youngest son started out shooting 12ga's...he had the same reaction. Now he shoots 100 clays about each weekend with me using #6 shot. Hang in there...you'll begin to like it and get the shotgun bug like all of us.
     
  12. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Correctly "mounting" a shotgun is essential to not only recoil management, but proper aim. A shotgun should be placed high in the shoulder. The heel of the butt should sit slightly above the shoulder and "drawn in" or pulled down into the shoulder. The cheek should be placed firmly into the stockwith the neck extended slightly (not pulled back).

    If the butt is placed too low in the shoulder you will get an improper sight picture and hit high. If the cheek is loose on the stock it will slap you hard enough to leave a bruise and cause the same "high hit" problem.

    The off foot (left foot on a right handed person) should be slightly forward of the strong foot. Knees should be unlocked (slightly bent). The waist should be bent forward so the shoulders are above the off foot. This will allow your body mass to rock back in recoil.

    Reduced recoil loads from Remington or the Federal Tactical Buckshot make for much more manageable shooting and pattern much more tightly than conventional "full power" loads.

    For practice there are very light loads with 1 oz payloads that are pu$$ycats by comparison.
     
  13. RMc

    RMc Member

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    Less recoil than a 20 gauge:

    12 Gauge Federal Law Enforcement Tactical Flitecontrol 8 pellet OO Buckshot.

    0ne ounce at 1140fps vs 1 1/16th ounce @ 1220fps for 20 gauge buckshot.

    AMMO TO GO has this ammo for sale online.
     
  14. M14sRock

    M14sRock New Member

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    Well, it's an old thread but I just saw it.

    A 12ga should not be painful if it fits right. The synthetic stock can be weighted with silicone caulking. I sometimes mix BB's into it for even more weight.

    Also, have the forcing cone removed from the barrel. It will pattern better and kick less.

    And good technique is a must.
     
  15. wb_carpenter

    wb_carpenter New Member

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    I shot about 100rds of 12 gauge shooting clays in one day this summer. I wish I would have taken a pic of my shoulder it was black and blue for awhile.
     
  16. tonydewar

    tonydewar New Member

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    kick

    i will not comant on anyones macho here but instead on gun mount and fit and loads get a stock that fits and learn how to correctly mount your gun loads how many slugs or buck shot rounds are you going to fire in a defence situation? you WILL NOT notice recoil then for clays or practice stick with light target loads i shoot about 1000 rds a month using 1 oz 1200 fps 71/2 or 8 shot and never bruse also the worst way to start out a new shooter is to give them somthing thay may not enjoy imofuo
     
  17. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    I hunt w/ 3 shotguns. By far my Dads old 12ga break action extra full choke w/ a 32" tube is the worst. It only takes 2 3/4" shells, but w/ high brass it is abusive. My Mossberg 500 is a ***** cat, so is my Charles Daly Field auto. Both of those are 3" chambers. I shoot #1 or BB 3" all day long during waterfowl season. Design is everything!!! Even though the Daly is a lightweight gun it is very mild.
     
  18. RMc

    RMc Member

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    Stock dimensions...

    ...make a major difference. For example, I find the NEF series single shot 12 bore to be abusive to shoot - untill I lower and slope the comb of the stock forward. After alterations recoil becomes far less of a concern.

    On the other hand, I don't have any problems with the stock dimensions of the Remington 870 series.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2011
  19. Smurfette

    Smurfette New Member

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    I think your wife can handle it

    I weight 89-92... my first firing was with the Remington 870 and a Benelli Super Sport last week.. I got a bruise on my right arm cuz I didn't hold it correctly the first time. but after learning to stand and hold the gun correctly, I didn't get any bruise anywhere else... my shoulder was perfectly fine lol and I am going this weekend too hehe I guess I'm hooked.. XD
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2011
  20. red ryder

    red ryder New Member

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    my mother handles my mossberg 590 12gauge just fine :p