shotgun ammo

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by 95sniper, Oct 31, 2013.

  1. 95sniper

    95sniper New Member

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    So I want to get a shotgun for Christmas. I have never owned one and I would like to know the uses for each type of shot. Like buckshot, what is it good for? When I shoot skeet what type of shot and why? Ect.
     
  2. sigman84

    sigman84 New Member

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    Birdshot like 7 1/2 is good for clays. 00 buckshot is for HD and well hunting. Slugs are for hunting or PD as well depending on the slug type.
     

  3. 95sniper

    95sniper New Member

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    So what would be good for duck hunting?
     
  4. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Most hunters have a water fowl gun and an up land bird gun. The larger Magnum shotguns for ducks and geese. A lighter maybe .20 or .12 gauge for quail, grouse or pheasant etc. These guns are also nice for target shooting. Go to a gun store and learn about chokes and shot sizes etc. If possible visit a Trap or Skeet range and shoot some "Clays". :)
     
  5. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    This site is very informative for both new hunters and experienced hunters.
    http://www.winchester.com/choose-your-ammo/Pages/Choose-Your-Ammo.aspx

    Field and stream has a great collection of articles for hunters. NRA has the north american hunter series of articles. Ammoland has great articles on all aspects of hunting and shooting.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2013
  6. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Hunting waterfowl requires the use of non-toxic (non lead) shot. This could be steel shot, bismuth, or heavi-shot (tungsten alloy).

    You will need additional licences (duck stamp) when hunting migratory waterfowl.

    In a very general way, the smaller the critter, the smaller the shot. Birdshot for birds, buckshot for bucks, etc.
     
  7. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Projectile choices are many. Slugs (rifled for smoothbore barrels or sabot for rifled barrels). OOO, OO, O, #1, #3, #4 buckshot for defensive use depending on the application they have purpose. OOO is the largest pellet, but uses fewer in the shell (generally). The large pellets penetrate better, but there are fewer and they tend to pattern worse (resulting fliers). OO is the standard load for 12 ga. Good balance of penetration, pattern and individual pellet energy. The smaller buckshots are useful for situations where you may want reduced penetration of secondary barriers (walls).

    BB, 2,4,5,6,7,7 1/2, 8,9,12 shot are progressively smaller. Each tend to give more dense patterns and hit potential at progressively closer ranges at progressively smaller (and easier to kill) game. BB and 2 used to be standard for geese until non-toxic shot was required. 4,5,6 were standard for ducks/teal until the non-toxic era.6-7 1/2 are commonly used on rabbits and squirrels. 7 1/2,8 and 9 are commonly used for small birds like dove and quail. I use progressively larger shot as the season progresses. Birds get more cautious and shots get longer. The larger shot has more energy at longer ranges common with late season hunting. 12 is almost a thing of the past. It is most often used now in handgun (rat shot) shells.

    Skeet trap and sporting clays generally use the shot type typical for wing shooting. 7 1/2 - 9 are used for a variety of reasons. Trap tends to give longer shots so larger pellets are normally used (7 1/2) than skeet (8 or 9)

    There is my "nut shell" summary of lead projectiles. Steel and other non-toxic alternatives use different numbers/letters to denote shot size, but that is another lesson entirely.
     
  8. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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    Game; Lead/Tungsten Steel
    Pheasant; 4 to 6, / 2 to 3
    Turkey; 4 to 6, / 2 to 3
    Quail, dove,; 7½ to 8
    Rabbit; 6 to 7½
    Squirrel; 6
    Geese; BB to 2, / TT to 1
    Ducks, low; 4 to 6, / 2 to 4
    Ducks, high; 2 to 4, / BB to 2
    Buck Shot, well Bucks ie Deer
    Slugs; Deer size game and bigger
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2013
  9. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    My old 97 Winchester is loaded with Double "O" and 1 Oz. home poured soft slugs. It lives in the jeep to discourage "Teddy Bears".:)
     

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    Last edited: Nov 1, 2013
  10. Virginian

    Virginian Active Member

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    You would be best served by spending some time at Wikipedia reading. They have a ton of info on shotguns.
     
  11. Artbrownsr

    Artbrownsr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Robo, I'd like to add that IF you hunt other game in a waterfowl area it could subject you to use non toxic for them also.
     
  12. Artbrownsr

    Artbrownsr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The two most often bought, compared to, and used throughout the world are the (by alphabetic order) Mossberg 500 and Remington 870. Both are in the $300 range ( the local Wal-Mart in Anchorage Alaska has them available for about $335 for either one), Both have been around a long time, are pump action, chambers range fro 2 1/2" to 3 1/2 ". Barrels and chokes are readily available for your choice of hunting.
    Regarding loads you should look at what Robocop has to say and then consider IF I am hunting rabbits in a wetland that has a protective sign that says "ONLY NON TOXIC AMMUNITION ALLOWED" I will use #4 Steel for my shot choice instead of #6 or #7 1/2 lead.
    For bear protection when the family is out fishing (usually salmon), or other activities, we keep Brenneke Rottweiler (2 1/2" slugs) , or Black Magic (3" slugs), the ballistics have shown and ( personal testimony by friends and acquaintances ) they are effective to bring down a charging bear (Brown and or Grizzley). All this is supposing you use 12 gauge as the bore of said shotgun these models are also available in smaller bore, check each Man. website for more info on this.

    I'M READY FOR THE CRITIQUE TO BEGIN:
     
  13. 95sniper

    95sniper New Member

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    Thank you guys for the responses, I have learned...
     
  14. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    One law you have to remember is when you are hunting waterfowl even if you are miles from a wetland you have to use non toxic shot. We shoot ducks and geese in my pasture. Waterfowl fly over my pasture every afternoon. Around Thanksgiving these birds are prime. What we do is called pass shooting. We are shooting these birds when they leave feeding areas headed for areas where they roost. Every year we bag wood ducks for turducken and geese that are served in a variety of ways. Many kids get to bag their first waterfowl in my fields.
     
  15. 95sniper

    95sniper New Member

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    Sounds like great fun...
     
  16. phildenton

    phildenton New Member

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    Lot of great info above, if you want one all purpose shotgun, the mossberg 500 combo with two barrels (an 18 1/2" open cylinder, no choke, and 28" modified choke) is an excellent choice. You can swap the barrels in under 2 minutes. The 18.5" is good for buckshot and slugs, hunting big game at around 50 yards and home defense, the 28" barrel with #6 lead is good for squirrel, rabbit, grouse. 3" steel #4 is good for ducks, 3" steel BB is good for geese, 3" steel #2 is all around waterfowl (ducks and geese) from the 28" barrel. you can get additional barrels too, 30" full choke, 24" rifled, etc. now if you have more money, then your options open up to dedicated purpose guns, but the others here with more knowledge are able to cover that.
     
  17. Artbrownsr

    Artbrownsr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    As I Stated before, this one above (Moss.500) and the Rem. 870 Express are reliable, versatile, and inexpensive, check the chamber size but the new editions are chambered 2 3/4-3 1/2 inch 12 gauge. Use the barrel that feels right to you for the purpose it is meant for load it up and have some FUN, DINNER, MAKE SOME NOISE!
     
  18. 95sniper

    95sniper New Member

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    That it's actually the same gun I was looking at.