Shooting with both eyes tip

Discussion in 'Training & Safety' started by 2ndAmendmentFreedom, May 6, 2012.

  1. 2ndAmendmentFreedom

    2ndAmendmentFreedom New Member

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    Hey all,
    I learned how to shoot by closing my non dominant eye, I'm right eye dominant and right handed. Anyway I've been trying to shoot with both of my eyes open, and as you probably guessed I'm seeing two sights and two targets. Squinting my non dominant eye allows me to hide the double vision to some extent. My question to all the experienced two eyed shooters, are you just ignoring the double vision or do you actually only see one sight and one target? I get the same "symptoms" with my 1911 and 870.
    Also depending on the lighting condition, do you find yourself closing your non dominant eye if it gets dark?
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2012
  2. glock22gen3

    glock22gen3 New Member

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    Both eyes open no issues.
     

  3. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    You can try turning your head a bit so that your dominant eye is directly in line with the sights and the bridge of your nose block the view from your non-dominant eye. This should relieve the double vision effect. With practice you will automatically pull the gun up to this alignment with either eye.
     
  4. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Both eyes open here. It is best to learn to shoot with 100% of your vision working for you. A bad guy might just be sneaking up on your left.

    My biggest issue is that I am right handed and left eye dominant. When shooting a rifle, I still shoot right handed but use my non-dominant eye. When shooting a pistol I lean a tad and use my left eye.

    I am going to the eye doc next week, and I intend to have him/her make me a set of glasses that focus my right eye perfectly at 36" and my left at infinity. If they don't make me go insane, they should help my acuity. It sure would be nice to see the sights and the target at the same time. :)
     
  5. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    The real question is, "What style shooting do you practice?"

    If it's competition shooting I don't think it matters as long as you're hitting paper.

    If it's fight shooting you need the second eye working for peripheral vision providing threat assessment.

    You may find this interesting:

    DOUG KOENIG: NON-DOMINANT EYE CLOSED?

    The bad advice that I hear most often is to shoot with one eye, the non-dominant one, closed. Most military schools and expert instructors teach that both eyes should be open, even in long range shooting. However, I still see a lot of instructors telling shooters to close the non-dominant eye. This is the absolute wrong way to teach shooting. Although many shooters may believe that the monocular versus binocular shooting is simply a difference in approach, the "one eye closed" method is not correct. --Doug Koenig, Professional Shooter, Hornady Ammunition
     
  6. 2ndAmendmentFreedom

    2ndAmendmentFreedom New Member

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    Well I shoot paper right now but we all know what guns can be used for, and usually it'll be a moving target in a moving environment so I totally get the use of having 2 eyes open. It's just something that I'm not used to yet and I was basically asking what's the goal, force my brain to suppress the double vision or learn how to ignore it. That's why I was asking how you guys see through your sights.
     
  7. JWagner

    JWagner New Member

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    Chainfire is definitely onto some good stuff. A couple years back, I had a prescription made for glasses that focussed at arms length. The reason was that I was doing a lot of benchwork and computer work that did not suit my bifocals all that well. At the range, my shooting improved a lot using those glasses. They really work.
     
  8. 2ndAmendmentFreedom

    2ndAmendmentFreedom New Member

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    I don't wear glasses though and I'd rather not have to accessorize myself in order to see & shoot accurately. In the case of ChainFire, I understand the need being dominant eye/hand "inverted".
     
  9. The_Kid

    The_Kid New Member

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    I'm left eyed and right handed. I shoot right handed while using the 'double vision;' when shooting shotgun, and a pistol and rifle when shooting quick off hand shots.

    Look at this video of me shooting a gallon jug from 2 to 7 yards while walking with a Daisy bb gun, (least expensive.)
    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDtcb4xxN1A"]Walking Shooting Day[/ame]
    I'd probably not get 4 shots off if I was trying to use the sights. This system works well at night.


    If I shoot long range or am being as precise as possible with a rifle, I'll shoot left handed using my left eye with the sights.

    When I want to be precise with a pistol I shoot right handed but simply align the sights with the dominant eye naturally.


    I can shoot either way with a rifle just as well, it is just that when I started shooting, no one told me about the dominant eye; so I learned everything right handed, instead of left eyed.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2012
  10. 2ndAmendmentFreedom

    2ndAmendmentFreedom New Member

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    This is a pretty cool exercise. I'm lucky I guess for not being cross-dominant (or whatever the word is), I should be consistent across all guns.
     
  11. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Glasses are a part of life for me. Then, again, I went to school with Moses. (though he was two grades ahead of me)
     
  12. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    I was taught "both eyes open" from the beginning. It's a big advantage hunting white tail in the timber of Eastern Washington.

    With my dominant eye behind the scope and both eyes open, I get a full field of view and my crosshairs are superimposed on my target. I occasionally get the double vision thing but quickly closing and opening my non dominant eye usually stops it.

    Tack
     
  13. 2ndAmendmentFreedom

    2ndAmendmentFreedom New Member

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    That almost sounds like a video game lol! So basically you have a clear picture with both eyes open and you don't see two targets?
     
  14. Chandler51

    Chandler51 New Member

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    Both eyes open. At first, I just ignored the "other" set of sights. After awhile I just didn't see them anymore. I've done the same with my AR, which has a 4x optic on it. It's really pretty amazing, you can train your brain to recognize only the magnified reticle. With practice, you can change between eyes. Lots of practice.
     
  15. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    I wear glasses (and I hope others wear some eye protection, too).

    Try a cloudy tape on the non-dominant eye lens when on the range. The clear image will be from the dominant eye.

    With practice, the tape will not be needed on the non-dominant eye lens of your eye protection when you are in the field.
     
  16. 2ndAmendmentFreedom

    2ndAmendmentFreedom New Member

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    Yesterday I was watching a new TV series (24 season 8) and I was aiming and shooting (snap caps) with both eyes for like 3 hours, trying to aim at the character's eyes lol. I'm really trying to force my brain to ignore the wrong image and your information was very valuable! Now I know that theoretically it's possible to ignore and even suppress the wrong image.

    danf_fl, I read about that method and I'll try it if I have a hard time.
     
  17. Chandler51

    Chandler51 New Member

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    Glad to help. There is an actual name for the technique, but it escapes me.

    Dry firing snap caps is the way I finally got it down.
     
  18. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    Exactly...I will occasionally see the side of my scope but a quick blink clears it up. I've know people who swear they can't do this. I think the level of how much 1 eye dominates the other is different in everyone so it comes easier to some than to others. I also know that it was very difficult for me at first but my dad trained it into me by having me snap shoot milk cartons offhand with both eyes open. Initially ranges were 10 to 20 yards but before long I was drilled them out to 100 yard and it's been pretty easy ever since.

    Good Luck

    Tack
     
  19. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    Exactly...I will occasionally see the side of my scope but a quick blink clears it up. I've know people who swear they can't do this. I think the level of how much 1 eye dominates the other is different in everyone so it comes easier to some than to others. I also know that it was very difficult for me at first but my dad trained it into me by having me snap shoot milk cartons offhand with both eyes open. Initially ranges were 10 to 20 yards but before long I was drilled them out to 100 yard and it's been pretty easy ever since.

    Good Luck

    Tack
     
  20. 2ndAmendmentFreedom

    2ndAmendmentFreedom New Member

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    That's weird how your two posts are the same but 12 minutes apart :)

    Anyway after 6 hours (2 x 3 hours straight) of snap capping, I'm finally able to consistently see my sights clearly with both eyes open, my target is also clear but doubles (the right image is always the right one, no put intended :) )
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2012